It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 07:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

VP
VP
avatar
S
Joined: 09 Jun 2010
Posts: 1403

Kudos [?]: 159 [0], given: 916

Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2016, 09:23
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come
_________________

visit my facebook to help me.
on facebook, my name is: thang thang thang

Kudos [?]: 159 [0], given: 916

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3157

Kudos [?]: 3303 [1], given: 22

Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2016, 12:00
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
thangvietnam wrote:
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come


The two elements of comparison are:
1. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy.
2. Anyone (A) has ever come / (C) ever had done.

Past perfect is not the correct choice here. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy in the 1940's. Using past perfect for the second element of comparison implies a comparison with those who came before 1940's. However the sentence intends to compare with those who came until now. Hence present prefect tense is better.

Correct A. ...he came as close to being a carbon copy as anyone has ever come...

Kudos [?]: 3303 [1], given: 22

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 374

Kudos [?]: 90 [0], given: 349

Location: Russian Federation
Concentration: General Management, Economics
GMAT 1: 640 Q44 V33
WE: Sales (Telecommunications)
Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Mar 2016, 14:38
Correct idiom is "as X..as Y". We need present perfect (because we have word "ever"). Hence A is correct. Past perfect tense is wrong
_________________

"Are you gangsters?" - "No we are Russians!"

Kudos [?]: 90 [0], given: 349

BSchool Forum Moderator
avatar
G
Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 399

Kudos [?]: 184 [0], given: 198

Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V39
GPA: 3.65
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2017, 03:14
OE from Ron on Manhattan Forum :
i'm going to have to be the dissenting voice here; i personally like (a) better than the other choices.

(d) and (e) are plainly wrong; "as close..." must be followed up by "as".

(c) also doesn't make any sense, because there's no precedent for "done". specifically, the sentence doesn't use any other form of the verb "to do", so "done" isn't properly parallel to anything.

(a) makes sense: he came as close as anyone has ever come. that's totally parallel. also, the "ever" is inserted in the location that's traditionally considered correct for these sorts of things: between the helping verb and the participle (i.e., between "has" and "come"). i don't think it's unidiomatic to write "ever has come", but that would certainly be more awkward than "has ever come".

in (b), you could probably argue for "had been", in the sense that it means "had been ... as close". so that's ok.
as a tiebreaker, though, the placement of "ever" isn't optimal in this choice; "had ever been" would be better.

--

as another tiebreaker, note that (a) is in the present perfect and (b) is in the past perfect. both of these actually make sense, but they have different interpretations:
* present perfect (as in choice a) means that he came closer than anyone else all the way up to the present day
* past perfect (as in choice b) means that he came closer than anyone else up to his time. the use of the past perfect actually implies that someone has since come closer; in particular, the fact that the present perfect isn't used seems to imply this.

the reason this is a tiebreaker is that you're obliged to preserve the meaning of the original sentence, insofar as it actually makes sense. because the present perfect is a valid interpretation, the past perfect constitutes an unacceptable change of meaning.
_________________

Compilation of Blogs by Mike Mcgarry - Magoosh

Kudos [?]: 184 [0], given: 198

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 07 Sep 2014
Posts: 484

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 342

Concentration: Finance, Marketing
CAT Tests
Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2017, 22:30
(A) as anyone has ever come
(B) as anyone ever had been :- Placement of ever is wrong. HAD EVER BEEN will be better,
(C) as anyone ever had done

ROn excerpt:-
as another tiebreaker, note that (a) is in the present perfect and (b) is in the past perfect. both of these actually make sense, but they have different interpretations:
* present perfect (as in choice a) means that he came closer than anyone else all the way up to the present day
* past perfect (as in choice b) means that he came closer than anyone else up to his time. the use of the past perfect actually implies that someone has since come closer; in particular, the fact that the present perfect isn't used seems to imply this

the reason this is a tiebreaker is that you're obliged to preserve the meaning of the original sentence, insofar as it actually makes sense. because the present perfect is a valid interpretation, the past perfect constitutes an unacceptable change of meaning.

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 342

Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine   [#permalink] 27 Aug 2017, 22:30

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 25 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.