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By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 10:11
oishik2910 wrote:
AbdurRakib wrote:
By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, in 1797–1798 Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him to arrive at an astonishingly accurate figure for the weight of the earth.


A. By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, in 1797–1798 Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him
B. In 1797–1798, by devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him
C. Henry Cavendish devised an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employed uncommonly precise measurements, and in 1797–1798 was able
D. Having devised an instrument from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employment of uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish in 1797–1798 was able
E. By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish was able in 1797–1798

sir I am generally confused with usage of having and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: having devised and having employed would it have been correct

Dear oishik2910,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, if you want the attention of another member on GC, it's best to use the "mention this user" feature.

Also, you would make your questions much clearer and less of a challenge to interpret if you used quote marks (and preferably color) to set off your words from what you are quoting. For example,
You wrote: "sir I am generally confused with usage of having and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: having devised and having employed would it have been correct"
I suggest: "sir I am generally confused with usage of "having" and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: "having devised" and "having employed" would it have been correct."
The quote marks are necessary for clarity. The color adds additional clarity.

Here is the version you suggest:
Having devised an instrument from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and having employed uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish in 1797–1798 was able . . .
This is 100% grammatically correct, but it is still awful. Rhetorically, this sounds too stilted and hyper-formal--it doesn't sound natural at all. No native speaker would say this.

Remember that the GMAT SC is not simply a test of grammar. On the GMAT SC, grammar & logic & rhetoric all work together to bring forth meaning.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 10:16
mikemcgarry wrote:
oishik2910 wrote:
AbdurRakib wrote:
By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, in 1797–1798 Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him to arrive at an astonishingly accurate figure for the weight of the earth.


A. By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, in 1797–1798 Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him
B. In 1797–1798, by devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish’s apparatus enabled him
C. Henry Cavendish devised an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employed uncommonly precise measurements, and in 1797–1798 was able
D. Having devised an instrument from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employment of uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish in 1797–1798 was able
E. By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and employing uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish was able in 1797–1798

sir I am generally confused with usage of having and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: having devised and having employed would it have been correct

Dear oishik2910,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, if you want the attention of another member on GC, it's best to use the "mention this user" feature.

Also, you would make your questions much clearer and less of a challenge to interpret if you used quote marks (and preferably color) to set off your words from what you are quoting. For example,
You wrote: "sir I am generally confused with usage of having and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: having devised and having employed would it have been correct"
I suggest: "sir I am generally confused with usage of "having" and consider the same as wrong but in option D if both parallelism had a structure of: "having devised" and "having employed" would it have been correct."
The quote marks are necessary for clarity. The color adds additional clarity.

Here is the version you suggest:
Having devised an instrument from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and having employed uncommonly precise measurements, Henry Cavendish in 1797–1798 was able . . .
This is 100% grammatically correct, but it is still awful. Rhetorically, this sounds too stilted and hyper-formal--it doesn't sound natural at all. No native speaker would say this.

Remember that the GMAT SC is not simply a test of grammar. On the GMAT SC, grammar & logic & rhetoric all work together to bring forth meaning.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

thanks sir will keep the things in mind while posting

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 10:19
kawaljeet wrote:
Very well Explain Buddy.. But I have a doubt and because of this, I have directly eliminated option E.
" Henry Cavendish was able in 1797–1798 " is this the correct wording??? "Was able in this to this " It seems its not concise and that's why i Chose C.

Thanks in advance.

Dear kawaljeet,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The short answer is: yes, that's perfectly fine. The prepositional phrase "in 1797-1798" is a verb modifier, an adverbial modifier. Unlike noun modifiers, adverbial modifiers are much freer in the rules about their placement. It's perfectly fine to put this modifier between "able" and "to arrive." In fact, this is a sophisticated structure that is slightly rarer, and these facts can make it particularly challenging for non-native speakers to accept.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 10:26
mikemcgarry
What all would comprise rhetoric? Since rhetoric is important would there be certain conventions to keep in mind in order to make sure the sentence is rhetorically correct in addition to being correct in terms of grammar and logic?

Thanks

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 14:38
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Bounce1987 wrote:
mikemcgarry
What all would comprise rhetoric? Since rhetoric is important would there be certain conventions to keep in mind in order to make sure the sentence is rhetorically correct in addition to being correct in terms of grammar and logic?

Thanks

Dear Bounce1987,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

For starters, I will recommend this blog article:
Rhetorical Construction on the GMAT Sentence Correction

A sentence is rhetorically effective if it is clear, direct, powerful, and persuasive. If a sentence is too wordy, that's a rhetorical issue. If the sentence is neither direct nor forceful, that's a rhetorical problem. For example, does the sentence make the focus the subject and does it locate the main activity in the main verb? Having the action as a verb vs. a noun is often a rhetorical issue. Is the focus-noun the subject or hidden in a prepositional phrase? Also, verbs in the passive voice are 100% grammatically correct but often present rhetorical issues. Another issue, in a list, is: what governs the order of the list? Is it logical? chronological? or just random? Random organization is not rhetorically sound. Finally, there's that very hard-to-articulate realm of rhetoric—whether something would sound "natural" or "awkward" to a native speaker. This is particularly tricky: on the harder SC, the GMAT loves to create incorrect answer choices that are 100% grammatically correct but some combination that no native speaker ever would say.

The best way to improve one's understanding of rhetoric is to make a habit of doing challenging reading every day.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Magoosh Test Prep

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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2017, 02:02
"E" is correct - The verbs 'devising', 'employing', and 'was able' have their correct logical subject (Henry Cavendish), and the actions of devising and employing are paired clearly, with by understood before employing.
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Re: By devising an instrument made from a rod, wire, and lead balls, and e   [#permalink] 23 Aug 2017, 02:02

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