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Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!

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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 07:10
bluesteelleft wrote:
Does anyone know if we get the deposit back after getting a full consortium scholarship? Probably not, but I figured I'd ask.


Depends on the school.

Kelley returns it.

Tuck doesn't, because scholarship only covers tuition and not other mandatory fee, the deposit would be forwarded to cover those.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 07:15
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Hey y'all join the FB group of the consortium 2018 class. The link to it is on the OP policies document they sent, in there there is a link to join the a Group me chat...
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 08:56
philosobot wrote:
After all of the waiting, in at Anderson.

Congratulations!
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Lauren McGlory: Blazing trails at Emory’s Goizueta Business School  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 09:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Lauren McGlory: Blazing trails at Emory’s Goizueta Business School
This blog post comes to The Consortium courtesy of Cherice Daniels, student liaison at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School.

Image
Lauren McGlory

Weeks away from earning her MBA at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, Consortium fellow Lauren McGlory is also earning high honors from her student colleagues for her service as the president of the school’s Graduate Business Association—the MBA program’s student government body.

As the first black female to hold the top GBA post, she’s led efforts to revitalize the organization, while learning skills to balance her work in two challenging roles: student and board president.

“It’s very rewarding. but there is a lot of pressure,” Lauren said. “As a double minority, I have to deliver triple the amount of work as someone else.”

Among her greatest accomplishments, she cites rebuilding GBA to be a structurally sound organization. She led the team in formalizing processes such as goal and objective setting, and has made the process easy for next year’s GBA board to hit the ground running.

“Reflecting on my time as section rep and being able to see inside of GBA, I knew what needed to change in order to improve how the board functioned,” she said. “I prayed to God and also thought about the encouragement I had received from my peers to run for the role.”

She’s also helped get more Consortium students involved in the organization by encouraging members of the Class of 2017 to get more involved with GBA and encouraging first-year students to run for positions.

More Consortium leadership on the GBA
Next year, for the first time in Goizueta’s history, Consortium members will hold six out of 11 GBA positions, including Jamie Perkins, a black and Hispanic woman who will serve as president. The five other Consortium students who will serve as board members are:

  • Jane Cole, executive vice president
  • Donnell McGhee, vice president of career services
  • Julius Bryant, vice president of marking and communications
  • Kiara Hinton, vice president of multicultural affairs
  • Lee Rensch, vice president of academic affairs
Although rewarding, Lauren admits that the role came with many challenges. However, the challenges allowed her to grow and become a stronger leader.

In the executive board meetings, Lauren had to learn to be warm and friendly while being direct, as that was the only way to gain the respect of her colleagues. While working to balance her life, she had to continually remind herself that you can’t do it all—not even all of the important things—and that you have to be OK with that. These two lessons alone will bring her success well into the future.

The GBA is one of the leadership opportunities available to MBA students at Goizueta, which prides itself on the emphasis of seven core values: courage, integrity, accountability, rigor, diversity, team and community. These values are neatly woven into the program and combine to form the foundation blocks for principled leadership. Goizueta strives to provide opportunities for students to sharpen their skills and become the leaders of tomorrow.

Lauren’s leadership is recognized both at Goizueta and abroad. Last year she traveled to China and represented Goizueta at the Global Business Forum—a network of student leaders. Lauren’s leadership at this session impacted this group in such a way that she has been asked to lead a session at this year’s conference in Switzerland.

Additionally, for her work with GBA and for the legacy she will leave at Goizueta, the school has nominated her for Who’s Who in America and for Poets & Quants Top 100 MBA Graduates.

When asked about words of wisdom for anyone pursuing leadership, Lauren references a quote from Honorable John Lewis: “Get in the way of anything that you know needs to change. If you don’t, it will keep happening.”

 

The post Lauren McGlory: Blazing trails at Emory’s Goizueta Business School appeared first on The Consortium.
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Newest Eagle Club member is an ex-Enron exec who remade himself  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 09:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Newest Eagle Club member is an ex-Enron exec who remade himself
Just a few weeks ago, James “Jay” Lewis—a refugee from Enron and now a successful startup entrepreneur—became the newest member of The Consortium’s Eagle Club, demonstrating the highest level of financial commitment to the organization he says enabled his career to flourish.

The New York University class of 1997 Consortium fellow today holds an usual position in corporate America, that of co-CEO at Just Energy Group, a company he co-founded after enduring the 2001 collapse of Enron, where he had been a young VP of the structuring and trading portfolios.

While The Consortium helped him realize options to “do something that I wanted, not something that I needed to pay off debt,” the Enron experience forced him to reinvent himself as a startup entrepreneur. Today, he shares his experiences, his perspective on the lack of diversity in senior corporate leadership—and why giving back to The Consortium was an easy decision.

Tell us a little about your job today and some career highlights? And why is your co-CEO position noteworthy?
With over 17 years of retail energy experience, I assumed the role of president and co-CEO of Just Energy Group in April 2014, alongside my long-time colleague, Deborah Merril. Just Energy is one of North America’s leading energy retailers, a public company with annual revenue in excess of $3 billion, and serving 2 million customers in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. We provide energy management solutions for homes and businesses, offering consumers more choice, control and convenience. Our vision is to be the gold standard in retail energy delivering value, stability and innovation to every one of our stakeholder relationships.

A career highlight dates back to my days as an entrepreneur. In 2002, l cofounded Just Energy LP, a Houston-based retail energy start-up. The deregulation of energy presented a unique opportunity to make an impact in an industry going through dynamic change. Much of my experience was gained while working previously at Enron as a young VP of the structuring and trading portfolios. The sudden financial demise of the company confirmed to me the importance of planning for the unexpected.

I took lessons in resilience and reinvention and applied them to my startup venture. In 2007, we sold the company to then Energy Savings Group, which later rebranded to current day Just Energy Group. Impressed with our growth, they retained our employees and senior management team, as well as our approach to business. You could say a career highlight was my appointment to president and co-CEO of Just Energy Group in 2014, which brought me full circle with the start-up I co-launched 12 years earlier.

A personal highlight further includes my current position as an African-American leading an international publicly held company, in an industry characteristically led by white males. Generally, with C-suites overwhelmingly white across the U.S. corporate spectrum, black business leaders are largely under-represented in top-level posts.

Only 15 executives of color have ever made it to the chairman or CEO position of a Fortune 500-listed company. Currently, there are only five active. That’s an incredibly low 1 percent in the top position. And it isn’t just black Americans under-represented. Minorities comprised just over 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs in 2014, and only 4 percent of women occupy the top executive post.

That’s where we are further uniquely positioned as a company. The organization operates within a dual-CEO structure, a rarity in the senior leadership echelons of corporate America. In fact, in the last 25 years, only 21 companies in the Fortune 500 have used the co-CEO structure. So, between Deb and I, we have broken the mold of conventionality in the industry in terms of gender, race and joint executive stewardship that is actually resulting in greater operational efficiency and organizational performance.

As a recent entrant to the Eagle Club, what was your path to deciding to make that leap?
The Consortium was an instrumental part of my educational journey. Between my savings from working at GE and The Consortium, I was able to graduate with no debt. This allowed me the opportunity to focus my job search on something that I wanted, not something that I needed to pay off a large amount of debt.

The Consortium provided a critical bridge to help me achieve my goal. It’s one thing to know you have the potential, but for many, as was the case for me, there’s a disconnect between academic potential and the financial resources required to fulfill that potential. Given where I am now in my professional career, I wanted to pay it forward, to help others achieve their academic aspirations, as I have. The Consortium was a natural choice.

How would you persuade someone else to become an Eagle Club member?
A large component of an MBA education is the study of return on investment (ROI). That’s exactly what the Consortium provides every student—a return on their academic investment. Through my fellowship, I received the financial support to invest in my education, my career and, ultimately, my ability to pay it forward in terms of business and community leadership. As an Eagle Club member, I can truly say that I’m giving back a fraction of the value I received.

It is my personal investment in the future of our young leaders-in-the-making, whether that leadership takes shape in the community, corporate or government sphere. It is gratifying to be a part of that.

The Consortium has helped more than 8,000 of the country’s best MBA students gain the financial access to fulfill their goals. This is a compelling reflection of The Consortium’s positive impact on American business through development of some of the country’s best and brightest talent, and their contribution to advance diversity up the management chain.

What benefits have you drawn from your association with The Consortium?
I realized benefits immediately post-graduation through the student resources available to assist in my job search. This included lessons learned by the interview experience which presented valuable opportunities to build the often overlooked soft skills (communication/expression/self-awareness) needed to complement the hard skills (or institutional knowledge).

There is also the opportunity for personal networking. I would encourage everyone to meet as many people as possible. Create connections that could benefit your long term career path, not to mention the satisfaction gained from establishing personal relationships that can last a lifetime.

How has the climate for diversity in U.S. business helped or hindered you on your path? Has that climate changed over the years? Have you seen ebbs and flows? In what ways?
I don’t feel that the climate for diversity either helped or hindered me personally in business. I can say, though, that being African American did impact others’ perception of me as a child growing up in a New Jersey suburb. One of only three black students in my elementary school, my presence there was already unsettling. When my family encountered hard times and we lost our home, it was just the thing to confirm the community’s preconceived expectations.

I can also recall vividly a grade two classmate who had skipped a grade. I was a good student and felt that I should have been selected as well, but was disregarded, I believed, because of the color of my skin. As you can imagine, these experiences left a lasting imprint on me. They shaped my attitude and motivation to pursue higher learning and accelerate my education. They also confirmed that you can never stop raising the bar for yourself; go beyond what others expect.

Turning to industry and the corporate space, although there is still work to be done (referring to the stats I mentioned earlier, we are seeing organizations acknowledge the importance of having diverse opinion, afforded by diverse representation, around the table. From my perspective, this helps us as a business to understand the preferences of an equally mixed customer base, and develop more customized solutions that fit their needs. It’s a win-win scenario.

Also, given the era of social media, instant, open communication is providing an influential forum to share experiences, promote awareness and move the conversation forward. Again though, there still remains a substantially low reflection of diversity up the corporate power pyramid. Unconscious bias still exists against others who don’t fit the archetypical model of leadership. Research shows that leaders are often subconsciously more comfortable working with people like themselves. Although some organizations are openly vocal about promoting diversity, many haven’t figured out how to translate the words into effective action.

What do you do when you’re not working? Hobbies, passions?
Certainly, outside business, my family keeps me busy, shuttling my three kids to and from basketball, baseball and gymnastics practices and games. I enjoy playing chess, and the occasional break from routine with a good suspense story, especially if crafted by Nelson DeMille.

Whenever possible, I try to participate in volunteer opportunities through the Just Energy Foundation and encourage members of our senior leadership to get involved in their local communities. Currently, we’re exploring mentoring opportunities at higher needs schools in Houston. It’s important to me to give back, to share what I can to help the next generation of students, especially those struggling to achieve their academic potential. Education is key. That’s how we break through walls, inspire change and ultimately build healthy, thriving communities.

As far as passions, I would love to teach after retirement. I enjoy economics, particularly Game Theory, studying the interaction between participants and the benefits-less-costs involved in a particular model to predict optimal decision making. I find that fascinating.

When is the last time you referred someone to The Consortium?
I believe it was in 1999. The Consortium simplified the MBA application process in that students were able to apply to more than one school through a central body, as opposed to having to submit directly to each school. Essentially, a one-stop, full service option.

The post Newest Eagle Club member is an ex-Enron exec who remade himself appeared first on The Consortium.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2016, 18:57
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philosobot wrote:
After all of the waiting, in at Anderson.


Congrats!!! I hope to see you at A-Days. Anderson is going to be a lot of fun. I can't wait!
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Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 02 Apr 2016, 19:07
repeated post

Originally posted by EnterNameHere on 02 Apr 2016, 18:58.
Last edited by EnterNameHere on 02 Apr 2016, 19:07, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2016, 19:00
mba2k14 wrote:
EnterNameHere wrote:
mba2k14 wrote:
Anybody else still haven't received a status update from the Consortium yet?


I have not, but I think it's because they are waiting on my ding (or possible acceptance?) from McCombs. The Consortium said that we would not hear until all schools have reported.

Not sure why you haven't heard though? Looks like all of your schools have gotten back to you... I'd reach out to them if I were you?

Best of luck!

BTW: Are you headed to Duke or UCLA???


Yeah, it was weird. It took until today to get the "official" acceptance from Anderson. They have to put your app through the UCLA graduate division for approval. So I guess I should hear from the Consortium soon.

Learning towards UCLA. You?


I'm definitely going to Anderson. I'm interested in Tech and west coast, so it's a perfect match.

Duke is also a great school. I don't envy the difficulty of your decision. I guess it depends on your career aspirations. Keep us posted on what you decide. Also, shoot me a note if you are headed to A-Days?
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Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2016, 06:58
I am considering if attending the MBA Catapult is really worth it. I want to go, but traveling expenses plus 3 days off of work and 0 guarantee that you will be given the fellowship makes it tough to swallow.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2016, 07:04
I am struggling with this same issue. I had posted it a few pages back. Most people seem to be going, but i'm not 100% sold yet.
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‘Consortium is family’: Alums describe our culture and their gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2016, 07:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: ‘Consortium is family’: Alums describe our culture and their gratitude
This short video includes Consortium alumni from the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s talking about the culture of The Consortium—”Consortium is family.” They also describe what the organization has meant to them personally and to the business world. As CEO Peter Aranda (WashU ’87) said, “We’re here today because of (Sterling Schoen’s) vision.”



We also get a few words from Patricia Schoen, the widow of Consortium founder Sterling H. Schoen, and Robert Virgil, who was dean of the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, an early supporter of The Consortium and a one-time board chairman.

Participants in this video discuss what The Consortium meant for their careers, but also how the vision of Schoen and his partner in launching the organization, Wallace L. Jones, addressed a vital need for corporations and business schools.

As Patricia Schoen notes: “Everybody got something out of it: the students got something out of it, the universities got something out of it and the corporations got something out of it.”

Pictured at top: Consortium alumni Angela Williams (NYU ’87); Karen Diaz (UCLA ’14); and Tosan Olley (Wisconsin ’15).

The post ‘Consortium is family’: Alums describe our culture and their gratitude appeared first on The Consortium.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2016, 08:51
Has anyone here had their Skype interview for the Toigo MBA Fellowship? I don't know what kinds of questions they will ask?
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2016, 09:10
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JMcFly wrote:
Has anyone here had their Skype interview for the Toigo MBA Fellowship? I don't know what kinds of questions they will ask?

I just had mine and, while the interviewer herself was very pleasant, the interview was harder than expected. I was expecting it to be pretty similar to the bschool ones, but I found the questions to be much more personal and there were no questions about my resume. Some that I remember are: how I define success, questions about my personal values and how I took those into consideration when applying to MBA programs and when deciding on my career path, what kind of leader I am and an instance where I failed to execute my leadership skills in an effective way.
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2016, 09:33
Izzy767 wrote:
JMcFly wrote:
Has anyone here had their Skype interview for the Toigo MBA Fellowship? I don't know what kinds of questions they will ask?

I just had mine and, while the interviewer herself was very pleasant, the interview was harder than expected. I was expecting it to be pretty similar to the bschool ones, but I found the questions to be much more personal and there were no questions about my resume. Some that I remember are: how I define success, questions about my personal values and how I took those into consideration when applying to MBA programs and when deciding on my career path, what kind of leader I am and an instance where I failed to execute my leadership skills in an effective way.


Thanks for the insight. I would at least expect them to go over your resume and ask about your interest in finance. Did anyone else have a similar experience?
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Re: Calling All 2016 Consortium Applicants!!!  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2016, 06:39
I registered for the MBA Catapult... Hopefully I'll see some of you over there.
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Indiana MBAs prep for return to the working world  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2016, 07:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Indiana MBAs prep for return to the working world
How do you leave the work world, enter a two-year MBA program, then return to the working world effectively? Emmanuel Fadina, a Consortium member and liaison from Indiana University-Bloomington, describes a workshop he and his fellow Consortium classmates attended to address just that issue.

Image
Kelly Fryer, Christina Naguiat and Preston Peten. Photo by Anna Teeter of the Kelley School of Business Creative Team.

It seemed like it was just yesterday I said my final goodbyes to work colleagues and took the plunge to return to school full time to get my MBA. Fast forward two years later and my time is almost over—graduation is just around the corner! Moving from the academic world back to the working world requires a different set of skills, expectations and behaviors, especially as MBAs. Being prepared for this transition is vital to our success.

On March 23, Consortium students at the Kelley School of Business took part in the Eddie C. Brown Professional Development Summit, made possible by the generous donation of Mr. Brown, a Kelley Consortium alum, reputable businessman and philanthropist.

Image
Reggie Butler. Photo by Anna Teeter of the Kelley School of Business Creative Team.

The summit featured a series of guest speakers, panelists and facilitators from the Dignitas Agency, who provided insights and guidance to Consortium students on re-entering the workforce and professional readiness. To me, the highlight of the summit was the frank discussions, or “RealTalk,” on topics such as career vision mapping, performing on the job right out of the gate and finding our authentic voice.

“Mapping Your Career Vision”
During this session, we learned what separates high achievers and happy high achievers, with the latter group possessing an indomitable sense of purpose and vision, relationships that create energy, and discipline. Having these traits don’t just naturally occur—they must be intentionally cultivated and worked on, and frankly, even fought for.

We spent time mapping our personal vision statements and really emphasized getting to the “why” and “how” of our efforts, not just “what” we will be doing in our careers. We left this session with a compelling urgency to curate this vision, which will lead to a career of both impact and satisfaction.

“IGNITE…Off the Block”
Using the metaphor of a track-and-field hurdler, we were given a detailed plan on how to “get out of the blocks” fast in our new roles in a step by step and systematic fashion. When we meet new people, almost instantly, an impression about us is crafted and may not change. We were taught how to strategically craft that message.

We were also given tools and advice on becoming more self-aware and savvy in navigating the complex and dynamic world of business politics that will inevitably arise.

“Finding Your Authentic Voice”
This discussion featured the importance of authenticity, and how it is the key to impact and influence on a large scale. We were challenged to know what we stand for and what our leadership style is, as this will prepare us for situations where our values and core will be challenged.

We also discussed dealing with conflict in a nuanced fashion and knowing when to rise, when to avoid and when to shut down. All in all, this session was focused on building courage to be who we are.

This summit was a very personal experience and epitomized the mission of The Consortium. Although I have gotten to know my Consortium classmates very well over the past two years, this was an opportunity for us to share deeper stories about our experiences, to be vulnerable, and to build trust.

Experiences like these truly make me grateful and honored to be a part of The Consortium and committed to serving its mission in my own personal way.

Pictured above: Consortium students and workshop participants Kelly Fryer, Christina Naguiat, Preston Peten and Khandyce Menard. Photo by Anna Teeter of the Kelley School of Business Creative Team.

The post Indiana MBAs prep for return to the working world appeared first on The Consortium.
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Consortium’s community: ‘The trump card that beat non-Consortium progr  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2016, 07:01
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Consortium’s community: ‘The trump card that beat non-Consortium programs’
The Consortium community. That’s what made the difference for one future member of our community. Ije Obiorah (pictured above) explains how a connection we facilitated with a Consortium alumna made the difference between choosing one of our member schools—the University of Wisconsin-Madison—and a non-Consortium program.

The Consortium network was one of the distinguishing reasons why I chose to go to the University of Wisconsin versus a non-Consortium university. So, thank you for bridging that conversation. I’m going to New York City at the end of the month and Consortium alumna Adeola Emdin (Wisconsin ’08) and I are going to try and meet up then! I’m very excited about everything that’s ahead.

I spent months working on my MBA applications, so I was elated when I was accepted into more than one program. I knew I had to be very deliberate in my decision-making, since the next two years would be transformational for my professional career. Staying true to my natural tendencies, I did my due diligence and developed an extensive spreadsheet and scorecard to weigh the benefits of each program.

Days and weeks passed and I was still genuinely conflicted. The one gap that remained was in my understanding of what type of impact the Consortium community could actually have (Editor’s Note: See our related video: “Consortium is Family“).

That’s Where Adeola Emdin Came In
Image
Adeola Emdin, 2008 Wisconsin graduate and dedicated member of the Consortium community.

I reached out to The Consortium about an alumna I had read about on The Consortium’s website (that was Adeola Emdin). You responded within 15 minutes and created that connection between me and this distinguished person who was in my desired field and who attended my school of interest.

Not only did I eventually have an insightful conversation with Adeola, but she’s already connected me with people in her network and even given me tips on where to get good Caribbean food in Madison, Wis.! That connection is not something I could have attained through LinkedIn, but the Consortium provided that while I was still a prospect.

But Wait! That’s Not All!
I had also reached out to a current student from a different Consortium school than the one I was considering. That student responded within 10 minutes while he was in China for an MBA project! Why? Because The Consortium was the common thread.

These two examples showed me a glimpse of what it means to be part of the Consortium community. It’s real, it’s responsive and it’s reliable. My decision to attend a Consortium-member university became crystal clear, and the experience I described above was the trump card that beat out the non-Consortium program.

I’m excited to be a Badger and to be a Consortium fellow. And I fully intend to pay it forward as it has been done for me.

The post Consortium’s community: ‘The trump card that beat non-Consortium programs’ appeared first on The Consortium.
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The first Consortium corporate partners  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2016, 11:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: The first Consortium corporate partners
Have you ever wondered which corporations were the first to throw their financial support behind The Consortium? Thanks to an inquiry from Kellee Scott, a Consortium board member, and help from Barbara Jones, author of our commemorative book, we have the list of the first Consortium corporate partners.

Barbara pointed us to the first Consortium annual report, which included the information in one of its appendices. It was published May 31, 1968.

Image
The first page of The Consortium’s list of corporate partners from the first annual report (click to see a larger version).

Between the 27 corporate partners, two foundations and individual donors, contributions for the 1967-68 fiscal year of The Consortium added up to $310,200.

The list of companies includes many that are recognizable today, and a few that no longer exist or have changed names. Consider two partners that have stuck with us every year since their first contribution: General Mills gave $7,500 in 1967; and Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co. — now known to us as 3M — gave $3,000.

This was in an era when 70 percent of American households earned less than $10,000 a year.

Fellowship Sponsors

  • American Airlines, $1,000
  • Bristol-Myers Company, $1,000
  • Continental Oil Company, $7,500
  • Cummins Engine Company, $7,500
  • Equitable Life Assurance Society, $3,000
  • Esso Education Foundation, $7,500
  • General Electric Company, $10,000
  • General Foods Corporation, $25,000
  • General Mills, Inc., $7,500
  • Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co., $3,000
  • Monsanto Company, $7,500
  • Ralston Purina Company, $7,500
  • Union Carbide Corporation, $1,000
  • Union Electric Company, $7,500
Image
The second page of The Consortium’s list of corporate partners from the first annual report (click to see a larger version).

Contributing Sponsors

  • Allis-Chalmers, $2,500
  • American Metal Climax, Inc., $2,500
  • Burlington Industries, Inc., $2,000
  • Celanese Corporation, $1,000
  • Continental Can Company, $3,000
  • E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, $3,000
  • Eastern Air Lines, Inc., $1,000
  • Owens-Corning FIBERGLAS Corporation, $200
  • Hoffman La Roche, Inc., $3,000
  • Oscar Mayer & Company, $3,000
  • Sterling Drug, Inc., $1,000
  • Trans World Airlines, $1,500
Two Foundations

  • Louis D. Beaumont Foundation, $30,000
  • Ford Foundation, $180,000
The post The first Consortium corporate partners appeared first on The Consortium.
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Early beneficiary of the mission of The Consortium pays it forward  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2016, 07:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Early beneficiary of the mission of The Consortium pays it forward
When Alvin Marley received The Consortium’s Wallace L. Jones Alumni Lifetime Achieve Award in 2013, he stood at the podium in New Orleans to accept it and was amazed at the energy pouring toward him from the students in the audience.

“Whatever they were giving the students, I wish I could put it in a bottle. There was a high spirit there,” Marley said. “It was amazing for me to witness that.”

For him, it was a clear reminder that the spirit and mission of The Consortium was alive and well. That spirit is what has kept him engaged with The Consortium for more than 43 years as a high-end donor and member of the Eagle Club.

Still Serving the Mission
He’s also satisfied that the mission of The Consortium is still being served so many years after he left school. “I still consider it to be good that we bring in 400 students among the 18 schools, versus the six schools when I entered,” Marley said. “It says something that it’s still doing its mission 43 years after I graduated.”

As a member of the fourth class of Consortium students, Marley received his MBA in 1973 from Indiana University-Bloomington, but not before serving three and a half years in the U.S. Air Force as a mathematician analyst, testing the effectiveness of weapons against various targets.

It was while serving in the Air Force that he first heard of The Consortium. A friend who was applying to law school programs had picked up a flier about The Consortium during his research, knowing Marley was interested in a business education. After applying and being accepted at Indiana and The Consortium, Marley was granted an early discharge — as a captain — in late 1971. He dove into Indiana’s MBA program immediately, enrolling in January 1972.

“The Consortium was a godsend,” Marley said. “I didn’t have to have a business background. It gave me the ability to translate a mathematical set of skills to business. It gave me the opportunity.”

Honored at Indiana for Achievement
Forty-three years after receiving his MBA, Marley was back at Indiana University on April 8 to accept honors for professional achievement. He was among six graduates of the Kelley School of Business’ “Academy of Alumni Fellows.”

The honor was particularly touching for Marley, who was reunited with three of his 1973 IU classmates (and Consortium fellows) — Paul Malone, John Jones and Donald Trapp — who returned to be on hand for Marley’s honor.

“I was just so glad to see them there,” Marley said. “It was wonderful to be honored by the Kelley alumni association and it was also great that I had a community of Consortium students that I’d gone to school with to be there with me.”

Since 2013, Marley has been CEO of Lombardia Capital Partners in Chicago, a minority-owned investment firm managing institutional investments. He has spent his career in investment banking. His first job out of Indiana was with First National Bank of Chicago as a securities analyst. Later, the investment side of the organization became Brinson Partners, then Swiss Bank, then UBS.

“I was essentially with the same organization for 30 years, but we changed our name,” said Marley, who left in 2004 to join the precursor company to Lombardia.

Today, Marley says the mission of The Consortium is worth supporting.

“It begins with recognizing The Consortium with relation to their success. I recognize it as important, so therefore, I do want to give to causes that are positive and help others, but have also helped me,” Marley said. “I’d like to see the organization continue. If not for it, maybe I’d have gone to business school five years later.”

The post Early beneficiary of the mission of The Consortium pays it forward appeared first on The Consortium.
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Business school preparation: Students share task of preparing the next  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2016, 07:00
FROM The Consortium Admissions Blog: Business school preparation: Students share task of preparing the next MBA class
This is a guest post by Fabrizzio Chaves, a Consortium member and a member of the Cornell class of 2017. As a Consortium liaison, he writes of his efforts to help integrate the next class into the MBA experience. Business school preparation is a team sport, and it includes those who have come before.

Emigrating from Colombia to Miami, my experience as a first-generation American in the Information Age was shaped heavily on my self-reliance to discover how to best navigate this new Land of Opportunity that was completely foreign to my parents.

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Fabrizzio Chaves

My parents’ unfamiliarity with SATs, state testing and college prep led them to endow upon me a very high level of ownership in my success at a very early age. I was raised under of the guidance that “proper preparation would prevent poor performance,” also known as the 5P’s.

It is a phrase my mother would say to me daily from my first days at kindergarten to our most recent phone call.

As I learned more about the business world and finance, I transitioned to Cornell University’s Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management after five years with the AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company. My career goal coming to Johnson was to transition into investment banking.

During “Destination Johnson,” the admitted students’ weekend event for incoming Johnson students held every April, I met with members of the class of 2016, who helped to prepare me for what would eventually become a successful pre-MBA recruiting season that led to me securing an early investment banking offer with Citi’s Institutional Clients Group.

A year removed from the experience, I find myself as one of Johnson’s Consortium liaisons sharing the lessons that I learned a year ago with the next class of aspiring bankers.

When I applied to be a liaison, I reflected specifically on my OP experience. I look back at my interactions with the different banks, the connections I made on both personal and professional levels, and could not imagine a better start to my business school career.

My introduction to the Johnson Class of 2018 has consistently begun with my guidance to never overlook the experiences that brought them to this point and weave the positive lessons into their stories as they meet with banks. Securing an investment banking role is a job within itself that will test their ability to think on their feet, their dexterity, and their ability to prepare, as much as their knowledge of business, finance and accounting.

More than anything, I advise them to recognize that investment banking is eventually a team sport and in preparing to make this career move, their first opportunity to work as a team in business school begins at OP with the other aspiring bankers in their class.

Business school is more than just an opportunity to help students ascend to the next step in their professional career. Business school is about learning about and from your peers as much as your professors, seeking opportunities to expand beyond what you’re great at, and sharing the gifts that you entered with to help others succeed in their journey.

From a personal standpoint, I believe that the lifetime of valuing and emphasizing preparation, pivoting my career to investment banking, and sharing my knowledge of investment banking recruitment with the class of 2018 has allowed me to weave my lifelong values to launch a formalized early recruitment prep program at Johnson—a program that will set the precedent for preparation of all career verticals here at Johnson.

Pictured above: Consortium students Gabi Longe ’16 and Ronald Chunga ’17 presenting a slide for one of the sessions at Cornell’s “Destination Johnson” program. Also featured: Akshay Nigam, vice president of education for the Old Ezra Finance Club, who is in support of early recruiting prep.

The post Business school preparation: Students share task of preparing the next MBA class appeared first on The Consortium.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Business school preparation: Students share task of preparing the next   [#permalink] 16 May 2016, 07:00

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