GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 05 Dec 2019, 12:19

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 1066
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Sep 2008, 00:42
E for me.

C is contradicting the argument.

In E, if there are competing maize eating insects that feed on milkweed plants, then even these insects would be dieing. This will help evaluate the argument.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 864
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Sep 2008, 03:00
scthakur wrote:
E for me.

C is contradicting the argument.

In E, if there are competing maize eating insects that feed on milkweed plants, then even these insects would be dieing. This will help evaluate the argument.


exactly Even i was confused between C and E.

Actually only one thing is that ,what if there are enough milkweeds then inspite of competition they leed to death of caterpillars !!!

C is foolproof .
Suggestions welcome
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Aug 2008
Posts: 170
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Sep 2008, 09:22
C.

the ques asks if the farmer is putting the monarch butterflies at risk...
E is slightly weaker in the sense that even if maize-eating insects compete with monarch butterflies, it does not completely eliminate the risk of the latter feeding and dying.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 1066
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Sep 2008, 10:38
prasun84 wrote:
C.

the ques asks if the farmer is putting the monarch butterflies at risk...
E is slightly weaker in the sense that even if maize-eating insects compete with monarch butterflies, it does not completely eliminate the risk of the latter feeding and dying.


But is C not contradicting the argument "Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die."


To me C does not provide additional info to help evaluate the argument.....or is it that the argument "when these vaterpillers are fed......" means that these caterpillers are not always fed milkweek leaves?

I am loosing my sense here.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Apr 2008
Posts: 611
Name: Ronak Amin
Schools: IIM Lucknow (IPMX) - Class of 2014
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jan 2009, 19:44
C. I would stick with the scope when its confusing. So I ignore "other" insects.
What is OA?
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 908
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jan 2009, 19:46
I got C too.

If the CP are feeding during the same time, they are put at risk

If the CP are not feeding at the same time, they are NOT at risk.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Posts: 99
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2009, 22:07
Note that the author talks of caterpillars dying from feeding on the leaves laden with pollen but in conclusion, says, all monarch butterflies are in danger. There is a scope shift in the argument. Therefore, to evaluate his conclusion, D sounds the best.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 1277
Schools: CBS, Kellogg
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2009, 22:42
spriya wrote:
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The
insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by
the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields.
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.


Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the
argument?

A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants
19
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields


Many prefer C, but I think C has no effect on the argument. The time caterpillars actively feeing does not matter. The argument cares only the cases that caterpillars feeds "milkweed leaves dusted with pollen", and the pollen is claimed to be responsible for the risk of butterflies.

How about the leaves?

Only E says something about the leaves! and E is the best
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2013
Posts: 227
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Apr 2014, 15:08
Wouldn't using the "variance test" from Powerscore CR Bible on E mean - Yes the insects compete and use up all the pollen first, therefore the caterpillars don't die. Conversely, No, they don't compete and don't use the pollen therefore the caterpillars will use and die.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Jan 2015
Posts: 2
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jan 2015, 06:18
Someone please explain !!!

" Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed EXCLUSIVELY on milkweed leaves "

Which could mean that caterpillar's feed is LIMITED TO MILKWEED LEAVES.

If caterpillars have to LIVE, obviously they have to eat ONLY MILKWEED LEAVES all day all season, since caterpillar's feed is LIMITED TO MILKWEED .

How Option C is right ?

Also please explain in option C , How "actively feeding" is different from "feeding" in the context.

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 12 Jun 2015
Posts: 37
Schools: Sloan '19
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jun 2016, 23:21
Argument Analysis :

Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. A background information.
The insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. A background information.
Maize pollen is dispersed by the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields. A background information. Milkweed plants – new actor in the argument
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. A background information. Caterpillarsone more actor related to Milkweed plants.
When these caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they die. A background information – impact of modified strains of maize
Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at risk. Conclusion.

Assumptions -
a. Maize pollen is dispersed by the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants.
Assumes that pollens stay as well and wind is not strong enough to disperse pollens in short span of time or may be rain followed by wind to remove the pollens.
b. Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves:
To remove / reduce the impact of pollens, Milkweed does not produce any natural defense such as chemical etc., which may affect caterpillars.
c. Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves : maize and milkweed are grown in the same season hence pollens impact the caterpillar feeds.
d. Amount of pollens are significantly enough to impact the caterpillars.

Question stem :
Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the argument?

A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as commercial insecticides typically used on maize are – Argument is about impact on caterpillar
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as other parts of these plants – So what only pollens are dispersed
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the growing season when maize is releasing pollen –
Yes : then argument is strengthened
No : then argument is weakened


D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be killed by insecticide from the plants pollen – So what .Impact on other insects is not good enough to conclude about caterpillars
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields – Let them compete …where is impact of pollen?

Option C
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 06 Apr 2015
Posts: 13
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Technology, Finance
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V38
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jul 2016, 20:28
Conclusion - "Genetically modified maize put monarch caterpillars and in turn monarch butterflies at risk"
Option A - irrelevant
Option B - irrelevant
Option C - keep
Option D - irrelevant
Option E - keep
Apply variance test
Option C - Yes --> In this case maize pollen is the probable cause of death. Substantiates the conclusion
No --> In this case there might be some other causes of death (change of weather etc). Weakens the conclusion
Option E - Yes --> Lets us suppose insect ABC competes with monarch caterpillar. This can have multiple scenarios, what is the number of leaves are substantially more than the combined population of monarch caterpillar and ABC. This hardly effects the conclusion. Other Scenario could be combined population of ABC and monarch caterpillar is equal to the number of leaves. In the event ABC does not die from eating the leaves and monarch caterpillar dies we cannot say leaves are not responsible, maybe anatomy of ABC is different from monarch caterpillar.
From the above information I did not even check for No since option E can be eliminated.
Option C looks best in the choices given.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Feb 2015
Posts: 64
GPA: 3.92
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Dec 2016, 14:35
I like C. Undermines the conclusion if true.
Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 02 Sep 2016
Posts: 641
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Dec 2016, 06:35
Straight C.

If monarch butterflies are not ACTIVELY FEEDING during the time maize releases pollen then they won't feed on pollen and thus won't die.

Thus weakening the argument.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Nov 2016
Posts: 205
Location: United States (CA)
Concentration: Leadership, Strategy
Schools: Haas EWMBA '22
GMAT 1: 640 Q43 V35
GPA: 3.4
Reviews Badge
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2017, 17:58
The crux of this argument is that genetically modified maize kills the caterpillars which eat the leaves dusted with poisonous pollen.

The only answer that works in our favor to decide if genetically modified maize will hurt the caterpillars is to find out if the leaves are harmful during the butterfly spawning season. Answer C will help us. If we find out that yes, the caterpillars feed when the pollen release is at its peak, we can conclude that g-mod maize is hazardous to monarch butterflies. If not, it does not cause the caterpillars as much harm as the statement claims.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Sep 2017, 22:08
gmataquaguy wrote:
ttar wrote:
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The
insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by
the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields.
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.
Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the
argument?
A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields


Question Type: Evaluate an argument.
Conclusion: Genetically modified maize present danger to butterflies.
My AC is C.

A: Boot out. Argument stem doesnt discuss about "maize-eating insects" and commerical Vs natural insecticide. Out of Scope.
B: Boot out. The argument stem isnt concerned with which part of hte maize plant produces most or least insectiticide.
C: Good Point. Are the catterpillar feeding during the time pollen is released? Keep AC.
D: Boot out. Out of Scope? Insects? We are talking of the sequence of events between maize plants and catterpillar.
E: Boot out. Out of Scope. Why does it matter if there is competition or not.


IMO E is also contender.
If caterpillars face competition, they die because of competition rather than eating pollen. So it will be helpful to know option E.
Can someone please explain logic behind eliminating E?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2019
Posts: 26
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2019, 01:51
Quote:
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields. Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at risk.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the argument?


Conclusion: Farmers are putting monarch butterflies at risk by using genetically modified maize.


A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as commercial insecticides typically used on maize are. Comparison with commercial insecticides is out of scope of the passage.
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as other parts of these plants. These Caterpillars feed exclusively on pollen laden milkweed leaves. Concentration of insecticide on other parts of maize is immaterial.
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the growing season when maize is releasing pollen. This is the best choice.If the caterpillars are actively feeding during pollination time then modified maize is a risk to caterpillars.
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be killed by insecticide from the plant's pollen. We are exclusively talking about monarch butterflies. Knowing about insects in general will not help us evaluate the argument.
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields. If some maize-eating eating insects are competing with monarch caterpillar for leaves of milkweed plants, then we can say that probably maize-eating insects are a risk to caterpillars and its got nothing to do with farmers. This option is very vague.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 17 Aug 2018
Posts: 275
GMAT 1: 610 Q43 V31
GMAT 2: 640 Q45 V32
GMAT 3: 640 Q47 V31
Premium Member
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Oct 2019, 19:25
Dear experts, can you please help to decide between (C) and (E)?

Let's apply the Variance Test from PowerScore CR Bible.

C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars (MBC) are actively feeding during the part of the growing season when maize is releasing pollen

Yes, MBC are actively feeding and we know that they die from pollen.
No, MBC are not feeding, so maybe they do not die?

Good candidate.

E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields

Yes, there are some hungry insects that compete with MBC for leaves. So, they probably are another cause of MBC deaths. Still, MBCs can die from pollen, but hungry insects play a role, too.

No, there are no hungry insects that compete with MBC for leaves. So, MBCs dies from pollen.

(E) appears to be a good option, too.

I am confused with the above and will greatly appreciate your help.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a   [#permalink] 22 Oct 2019, 19:25

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 38 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne