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Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h

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Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 04:31
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Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-handed” species, with shells coiling to the left and right, respectively. Some left-handed species have evolved from right-handed ones. Also, researchers found that snail-eating snakes in the same habitat have asymmetrical jaws, allowing them to grasp right-handed snail shells more easily. If these snakes ate more right-handed snails over time, this would have given left-handed snails an evolutionary advantage over right-handed snails, with the left-handed snails eventually becoming a new species. Thus, the snakes' asymmetrical jaws probably helped drive the emergence of the left-handed snail species.

Which of the following would, if true, most strengthen the argument that asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution?

A. In one snake species, the snakes with asymmetrical jaws eat snails, while the snakes with symmetrical jaws do not eat snails.
B. Some species of Asian snails contain either all right-handed snails, or all left-handed snails.
C. Anatomical differences prevent left-handed snails from mating easily with right-handed snails.
D. Some right-handed snails in this habitat have shells with a very narrow opening that helps prevent snakes from extracting the snails from inside their shells.
E. Experiments show that the snail-eating snakes in this habitat fail more often in trying to eat left-handed snails than in trying to eat right-handed snails.


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Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2019, 22:16
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Alpha14 wrote:
GMATNinja, gmat1393 plz explain why is D wrong and E correct ?


Greetings Alpha14,

While experts pour in their comments here are my 2 cents,

The question is asking us to find the option that would- most strengthen the argument that asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution

In simpler words, we need to find an option that would justify how a small advantage(i.e snail-eating snakes had a hard time catching left-handed snails) helped drive left-handed snail evolution.

Option D says,

D. Some right-handed snails in this habitat have shells with a very narrow opening that helps prevent snakes from extracting the snails from inside their shells.


Here, the option is contrary to what we want. The option is saying that right-handed snails already had an advantage and snakes had a hard time catching them.

Furthermore, another reason this option faults is we are not told whether the snakes ate the snails with/without shells and we don't care also.

Here is a small quote from the argument stem, option D is just trying to distort a fact presented in the question.

snail-eating snakes in the same habitat have asymmetrical jaws, allowing them to grasp right-handed snail shells more easily

Please let me know if you have any questions, I would love to expand more on my explanantion
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Re: Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2019, 03:18
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Alpha14 wrote:
GMATNinja, gmat1393 plz explain why is D wrong and E correct ?

Hmm... I had no idea that snails could be right- or left- handed, seeing as they have no hands that I've ever noticed. :idontknow: On to your question, though:

As sakshamchhabra pointed out, the main reason to eliminate (D) is that it supports a conclusion opposed to the conclusion of the passage.

To answer the question, we need to strengthen the specific argument that "asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution." Because the information in (D) introduces a competitive advantage of right-handed snails, it does not support the argument that " the snakes' asymmetrical jaws probably helped drive the emergence of the left-handed snail species." (D) is out.

Take another look at (E):
Quote:
E. Experiments show that the snail-eating snakes in this habitat fail more often in trying to eat left-handed snails than in trying to eat right-handed snails.

From the passage, we know that snail-eating snakes with asymmetrical jaws have more trouble grasping left-handed snails than right-handed snails. (E) goes a bit further, stating that the snakes fail more often when they try to eat left-handed snails. This strengthens the argument that "asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution," because more left-handed snails survive snake attacks and live to create left-handed snail babies. (E) is the correct answer.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 13:50
Bunuel wrote:
Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-handed” species, with shells coiling to the left and right, respectively. Some left-handed species have evolved from right-handed ones. Also, researchers found that snail-eating snakes in the same habitat have asymmetrical jaws, allowing them to grasp right-handed snail shells more easily. If these snakes ate more right-handed snails over time, this would have given left-handed snails an evolutionary advantage over right-handed snails, with the left-handed snails eventually becoming a new species. Thus, the snakes' asymmetrical jaws probably helped drive the emergence of the left-handed snail species.

Which of the following would, if true, most strengthen the argument that asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution?

A. In one snake species, the snakes with asymmetrical jaws eat snails, while the snakes with symmetrical jaws do not eat snails.
B. Some species of Asian snails contain either all right-handed snails, or all left-handed snails.
C. Anatomical differences prevent left-handed snails from mating easily with right-handed snails.
D. Some right-handed snails in this habitat have shells with a very narrow opening that helps prevent snakes from extracting the snails from inside their shells.
E. Experiments show that the snail-eating snakes in this habitat fail more often in trying to eat left-handed snails than in trying to eat right-handed snails.


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Breaking down our argument:
1. there are left and right snails; some left evolved from right
2. snakes have jaws adapted to right snails
3. (if) snakes ate more right snails (then) left would have had advantage (and) become new species
4. (therefore) snakes' jaws drove evolution of left snails

The logic is extremely straightforward so we can look for a likely answer (a Precise approach). In particular, to strengthen the argument we can show that the logical connections (marked by 'then' and therefore') are correct: the snakes did in fact eat more right-snails; the left-snails did in fact have an advantage (no other predators); there were sufficient snakes for this to be an issue; etc..

Skimming through our options, (E) is the only direct answer -- it states that snakes are bad at eating left-snails so they have an advantage.
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Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 22 May 2019, 22:16
I was initially down to A and E , but saw A is wrong for one very strong reason i.e.

Also, researchers found that snail-eating snakes in the same habitat have asymmetrical jaws

option A is tying to put up the same in a little different fashion.

Originally posted by sakshamchhabra on 17 May 2019, 03:53.
Last edited by sakshamchhabra on 22 May 2019, 22:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2019, 04:21
DavidTutorexamPAL wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-handed” species, with shells coiling to the left and right, respectively. Some left-handed species have evolved from right-handed ones. Also, researchers found that snail-eating snakes in the same habitat have asymmetrical jaws, allowing them to grasp right-handed snail shells more easily. If these snakes ate more right-handed snails over time, this would have given left-handed snails an evolutionary advantage over right-handed snails, with the left-handed snails eventually becoming a new species. Thus, the snakes' asymmetrical jaws probably helped drive the emergence of the left-handed snail species.

Which of the following would, if true, most strengthen the argument that asymmetrical snake jaws helped drive left-handed snail evolution?

A. In one snake species, the snakes with asymmetrical jaws eat snails, while the snakes with symmetrical jaws do not eat snails.
B. Some species of Asian snails contain either all right-handed snails, or all left-handed snails.
C. Anatomical differences prevent left-handed snails from mating easily with right-handed snails.
D. Some right-handed snails in this habitat have shells with a very narrow opening that helps prevent snakes from extracting the snails from inside their shells.
E. Experiments show that the snail-eating snakes in this habitat fail more often in trying to eat left-handed snails than in trying to eat right-handed snails.


CR32441.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


Breaking down our argument:
1. there are left and right snails; some left evolved from right
2. snakes have jaws adapted to right snails
3. (if) snakes ate more right snails (then) left would have had advantage (and) become new species
4. (therefore) snakes' jaws drove evolution of left snails

The logic is extremely straightforward so we can look for a likely answer (a Precise approach). In particular, to strengthen the argument we can show that the logical connections (marked by 'then' and therefore') are correct: the snakes did in fact eat more right-snails; the left-snails did in fact have an advantage (no other predators); there were sufficient snakes for this to be an issue; etc..

Skimming through our options, (E) is the only direct answer -- it states that snakes are bad at eating left-snails so they have an advantage.


I was down to c and e. And the reason I didn't choose e because it stated "in this region snake could not eat left snail's then that would mean in some other they can.
So isn't this not a strengthening statement.

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Re: Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2019, 12:29
GMATNinja, gmat1393 plz explain why is D wrong and E correct ?
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Re: Certain groups of Asian snails include both “left-handed” and “right-h   [#permalink] 22 May 2019, 12:29
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