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Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag

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Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2019, 03:22
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

24% (02:21) correct 76% (02:05) wrong based on 96 sessions

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Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with average land temperatures on Earth. Clearly-and contrary to accepted opinion among meteorologists-the Sun's luminosity essentially controls land temperatures on Earth.

Meteorologist: I disagree. Any professional meteorologist will tell you that in a system as complicated as that giving rise to the climate, no significant aspect can be controlled by a single variable

The rejection by the meteorologist of the statistician's conclusion employs which one of the following techniques of argumentation?

(A) supporting a conclusion about a specific case by invoking a relevant generalization
(B) producing a single counterexample that establishes that a generalization is false as state
(C) reanalyzing a correlation as reflecting the multiple effects of a single cause
(D) rejecting a conclusion because it is a proposition that cannot be experimentally tested
(E) pointing out that potentially unfavourable evident has been systematically neglected

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Re: Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2019, 09:38
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GMATNinja
Can you help explain why B is wrong? The statistician is generalizing the cause of a problem and the meteorologist is arguing against such generalization by quoting an example, so I dont understand why B is wrong.

For A, the meteorologist is indeed invoking a generalization but he is not supporting a conclusion though
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Re: Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2019, 06:48
I too marked B.
Could someone explain the rationale behind rejecting B and accepting A?
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Re: Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2019, 06:48
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Changes in the Sun's luminosity correlate exceedingly well with averag

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