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Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust,

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Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.



(A)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.


(B)The crust of "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza is more similar to a pie crust than to a traditional pizza-style flatbread and must be baked alone before adding toppings, thus taking longer to prepare than most other types of pizzas.


(C)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because of its crust, resembling a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before adding toppings.


(D)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because its crust, which is more like a pie crust than like a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before toppings are added.


(E)Because its crust is more like a pie crust than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer than most other types of pizzas to prepare it.

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Re: Chicago-style deep-dish pizza must have its crust [#permalink]

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Experts Please confirm my approach

Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.

(A)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.

Usage of and -> so takes longer to prepare it -> unnecessary reversal of sub-verb correct so it takes longer to cook.
from meaning seems as if someone else is making the pizza
There is another point 'AND' makes clause don't have any link. but i think usage of SO clears this ambiguity . There are questions in gmat prep with correct ans as ' , and so'


(B)The crust of "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza is more similar to a pie crust than to a traditional pizza-style flatbread and must be baked alone before adding toppings, thus taking longer to prepare than most other types of pizzas.

V-ing points to subject 'The crust' - it should be the pizza


(C)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because of its crust, resembling a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before adding toppings.

again Resembling points to Pizza rather that its crust
also for 'must be baked ..' we need a conjunction to join it -> ..., and must ...


(D)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because its crust, which is more like a pie crust than like a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before toppings are added.

correct

(E)Because its crust is more like a pie crust than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer than most other types of pizzas to prepare it.

there is no need of sub-verb reversal

so it takes longer to prepare than...

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2013, 08:21
D is the best answer.

But my concern is with this statement: ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza ...."

Aren't we comparing time taken to prepare a pizza with pizzas in the above statement?

""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than it takes to prepare most other types of pizza....." should be the correct sentence right?

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.


(A)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, which resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer to prepare it than most other types of pizza.
Wrong. Because "it" is not clear. We may think "it" is the pizza crust, not a pizza itself.

(B)The crust of "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza is more similar to a pie crust than to a traditional pizza-style flatbread and must be baked alone before adding toppings, thus taking longer to prepare than most other types of pizzas.
Wrong. "thus taking longer....." modifies the subject that is "The crust", not the pizza.

(C)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because of its crust, resembling a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before adding toppings.
Wrong. "because of its crust.... must be baked" is wrong grammar. Because of + noun phrase, not a clause.

(D)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because its crust, which is more like a pie crust than like a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before toppings are added.
CORRECT.

(E)Because its crust is more like a pie crust than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, "Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust baked alone before toppings are added, and so takes longer than most other types of pizzas to prepare it.
Wrong. Change meaning. We may think the crust takes longer to bake, but the meaning here is the pizza takes longer to bake.
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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2013, 05:44
anilisanil wrote:
D is the best answer.

But my concern is with this statement: ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza ...."

Aren't we comparing time taken to prepare a pizza with pizzas in the above statement?

""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than it takes to prepare most other types of pizza....." should be the correct sentence right?


Good discussion on this thread. I would add above that in addition to the pronoun "it" being ambiguous (the GMAT is pretty tolerant of pronoun ambiguity) "it" is completely unnecessary in the given statements.

As for the point quoted above, the comparison is between the attributes of the types of pizza (specifically the preparation time). We could write the sentence this way: ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza take to prepare....", but the phrase 'take to prepare' is understood and unnecessary.

Written as ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than it takes to prepare most other types of pizza....." compares Chicago style pizza with preparation time.

BTW, I lived in Chicago for 3 years and this passage makes me miss the Chicago-style pizza - it's fantastic...

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2013, 02:09
How come here it is acceptable to use "like" in Answer D when usually we have to such "such as"?

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2013, 09:07
serendipiteez wrote:
How come here it is acceptable to use "like" in Answer D when usually we have to such "such as"?


Like is used here to compare two nouns. In this example - 'pizza crust' to 'pie crust' and 'pizza crust' to 'flatbread'


D)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because its crust, which is more like a pie crust than like a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before toppings are added

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2013, 20:21
serendipiteez wrote:
How come here it is acceptable to use "like" in Answer D when usually we have to such "such as"?

The GMAT used to be picky about 'like' and not accept its use when the context means 'for example'. The GMAT is ever evolving and the use of like is more flexible now, like in problem V65 where the use of “like” means “for example” and is called “acceptable" in the explanation.

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2013, 16:59
KyleWiddison wrote:
anilisanil wrote:
D is the best answer.

But my concern is with this statement: ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza ...."

Aren't we comparing time taken to prepare a pizza with pizzas in the above statement?

""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than it takes to prepare most other types of pizza....." should be the correct sentence right?


Good discussion on this thread. I would add above that in addition to the pronoun "it" being ambiguous (the GMAT is pretty tolerant of pronoun ambiguity) "it" is completely unnecessary in the given statements.

As for the point quoted above, the comparison is between the attributes of the types of pizza (specifically the preparation time). We could write the sentence this way: ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza take to prepare....", but the phrase 'take to prepare' is understood and unnecessary.

Written as ""Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than it takes to prepare most other types of pizza....." compares Chicago style pizza with preparation time.

BTW, I lived in Chicago for 3 years and this passage makes me miss the Chicago-style pizza - it's fantastic...

KW


On a similar note i went to chi town last week and this sentence reminded me of the DEEP dish pizza, whose preparation required us to wait for over 45 minutes :).

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2013, 17:38
It's "D".
The modifiers are just perfectly placed.
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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2013, 05:38
Bluelagoon wrote:
On a similar note i went to chi town last week and this sentence reminded me of the DEEP dish pizza, whose preparation required us to wait for over 45 minutes :).


Now I am jealous :? ! You really can't get good Chicago style pizza outside of Chicago. BTW - good use of the noun modifier starting with "whose" (you also could have used "which) - it clearly refers back to the pizza.

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2014, 02:32
[quote="BukrsGmat"]Experts Please confirm my approach





(C)"Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza because of its crust, resembling a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread, must be baked alone before adding toppings.

again Resembling points to Pizza rather that its crust
also for 'must be baked ..' we need a conjunction to join it -> ..., and must ...






kyle

kindly look into this.

I went through all possible explanations i could get my hands on but none was able to clarify the Verb-ing modifier error that was pointed by BukrsGmat.

Even MGMAT explanation goes likes this for option C: Because of should be followed by just a noun (or a noun with modifiers), but, here, it is followed by an entire clause. The resulting construction—because of its crust... must be baked...—is not a proper sentence. Additionally, the action of adding (in before adding toppings) must refer back to the subject—illogically implying that the Chicago-style pizza crust can actually add toppings to itself. Finally, the comparison resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread is ambiguous; it could imply that the the Chicago-style crust is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread (the intended meaning), but could also be interpreted as meaning that the Chicago-style crust resembles a pie crust more than does a flatbread.


Rule states that Verb-ing modifier preceded by comma modifies the clause and not the preceding noun (Crust) so the fact that explanations are clarifying/stating the comparison among "Chicago crust", pie crust, and flatbread is unwarranted.


Also, for Option A and E, Is it safe to say that the phrase ", and so takes longer than most other types of pizzas to prepare it" is incorrect Not only due to no clear antecedent for "it" but also that (, and) should be used when 2 independent clauses are to be separated or for a list, none of which is fulfilled by the last phrase. ??

@Experts please help clear this out.

Thanks

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2014, 12:06
earnit wrote:
kyle

kindly look into this.

I went through all possible explanations i could get my hands on but none was able to clarify the Verb-ing modifier error that was pointed by BukrsGmat.

Even MGMAT explanation goes likes this for option C: Because of should be followed by just a noun (or a noun with modifiers), but, here, it is followed by an entire clause. The resulting construction—because of its crust... must be baked...—is not a proper sentence. Additionally, the action of adding (in before adding toppings) must refer back to the subject—illogically implying that the Chicago-style pizza crust can actually add toppings to itself. Finally, the comparison resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread is ambiguous; it could imply that the the Chicago-style crust is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread (the intended meaning), but could also be interpreted as meaning that the Chicago-style crust resembles a pie crust more than does a flatbread.


Rule states that Verb-ing modifier preceded by comma modifies the clause and not the preceding noun (Crust) so the fact that explanations are clarifying/stating the comparison among "Chicago crust", pie crust, and flatbread is unwarranted.


Also, for Option A and E, Is it safe to say that the phrase ", and so takes longer than most other types of pizzas to prepare it" is incorrect Not only due to no clear antecedent for "it" but also that (, and) should be used when 2 independent clauses are to be separated or for a list, none of which is fulfilled by the last phrase. ??

@Experts please help clear this out.

Thanks


Yes, the "it" is A and E is incorrect. I'm not quite sure what your question is about option C. Can you clarify for me?

KW
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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust, [#permalink]

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This sentence presents an interesting fact about Chicago-style pizza—it takes longer to cook than other types of pizza—and explains why: its crust must be baked separately before any toppings can be added.

To express this idea correctly and effectively, the sentence must create a comparison between Chicago-style deep-dish pizza and other types of pizza. The idea that deep-dish crust is more like pie crust than like traditional pizza crust should be expressed in a clear and unambiguous comparison. Finally, pronouns, if present, must be used correctly.

(A) This sentence states that Chicago-style deep-dish pizza... takes longer to prepare it. Here, the pronoun it does not have a sensible antecedent. (Literally, the sentence is stating that the deep-dish pizza can prepare "it"; of course, a pizza itself cannot prepare anything.) The comparison resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread is ambiguous; it could imply that the the Chicago-style crust is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread (the intended meaning), but could also be interpreted as meaning that the Chicago-style crust resembles a pie crust more than does a flatbread. Finally, the wording must have its crust... baked doesn't make sense. Taken literally, this wording suggests that the pizza itself requests or demands that the crust be baked.

(B) The subject of this sentence is The crust..., rather than the Chicago-style pizza itself. This choice thus creates an illogical comparison, involving just the crust of the Chicago-style pizza but involving "most other types of pizzas" in their entirety. Also, the action of adding (in before adding toppings) must refer back to the subject -- illogically implying that the Chicago-style pizza crust can actually add toppings to itself.

(C) Because of should be followed by just a noun (or a noun with modifiers), but, here, it is followed by an entire clause. The resulting construction—because of its crust... must be baked...—is not a proper sentence. Additionally, the action of adding (in before adding toppings) must refer back to the subject—illogically implying that the Chicago-style pizza crust can actually add toppings to itself. Finally, the comparison resembles a pie crust more than a traditional pizza-style flatbread is ambiguous; it could imply that the the Chicago-style crust is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread (the intended meaning), but could also be interpreted as meaning that the Chicago-style crust resembles a pie crust more than does a flatbread.

(D) CORRECT. Overall, this choice creates a proper sentence consisting of two clauses connected by because. Both comparisons (Chicago pizza takes longer to prepare than most other types of pizza and ...is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread) are correct and unambiguous. Finally, the sentence properly expresses the idea that toppings are added to the crust (by someone else).

(E) The comparison more like a pie crust than a traditional pizza-style flatbread is ambiguous; it could imply that the the Chicago-style crust is more like a pie crust than like a flatbread (the intended meaning), but could also be interpreted as meaning that the Chicago-style crust resembles a pie crust more than does a flatbread. The wording must have its crust... baked doesn't make sense; taken literally, this wording suggests that the pizza itself requests or demands that the crust be baked. Finally, this sentence states that Chicago-style deep-dish pizza... takes longer to prepare it. Here, the pronoun it does not have a sensible antecedent. (Literally, the sentence is stating that the deep-dish pizza can prepare "it"; of course, a pizza itself cannot prepare anything.

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Re: Chicago-style" deep-dish pizza must have its crust,   [#permalink] 27 Oct 2017, 03:17
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