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Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked

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Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Dec 2017, 16:06
2
5
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A
B
C
D
E

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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

69% (00:45) correct 31% (00:45) wrong based on 223 sessions

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Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked steadily and efficiently through the night, but sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented.

(A) sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented
(B) sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed to be disoriented, she noticed
(C) as they sipped their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented
(D) as they were sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed, she noticed, disoriented
(E) he seemed disoriented, she noticed, sipping their coffee the next morning

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Originally posted by nakib77 on 26 Oct 2005, 13:06.
Last edited by hazelnut on 18 Dec 2017, 16:06, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: 213/1000 - sipping coffee  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2011, 22:20
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A means they were sipping coffee throughout the night. That is not intended at all :-)

So I will go with phrase "as they sipped". Next morning she realized something different about her husband. That happens very often ;-) ha ha
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Re: 213/1000 - sipping coffee  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2011, 23:26
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When you use the pronoun ‘their’ for sipping the coffee, then a plural subject such as ‘they’ or ‘he and she; should follow as the modified subject. Choices A, B and E instead use the singular she or he. Hence they are out. Between C and D, the former is better because it avoids the use of past progressive and the unnecessary splitting of the verb phrase ‘seemed disoriented” by ‘she noticed’
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Re: SC- Diff 600-700  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2012, 08:25
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Try looking at it crudely:

(E) he seemed disoriented, she noticed, sipping their coffee the next morning.

Now, try taking out the unimportant matter. Generally, we find that content enclosed by commas are of lesser importance to the structure of a sentence.

Deploying that logic: he seemed disoriented sipping their coffee the next morning.

What does this now represent? That he got disoriented while sipping coffee in the morning!!

What should it mean, logically? That his wife noticed his disorientation while sipping coffee in the morning. The sipping of coffee is thus a background activity while her noticing his disorientation is the the main import of the sentence.

What supports this the BEST? Option C.
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Re: SC- Diff 600-700  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2012, 09:16
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The use of the plural pronoun their makes it essential that we use a plural noun as well namely they. Just referring to only- she-, the subject - pronoun number distorts agreement. So A, B and E are dropped. Chocie D is somewhat odd with the use of several split phrases. The wrong word order of the phrase - she noticed- just prior to disoriented is suspect. Therefore, C would be ideal
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Re: Need more explanation  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2012, 13:36
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Hi Vivek,
Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked steadily and efficiently through the night, but sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented.

Since the meaning of this sentence is simple to comprehend, let’s proceed to the error analysis:
1. The verb-ing modifier “sipping their coffee the next morning” suggests that she (Florence) was drinking her coffee as well as her husband’s coffee. This does not sound logical. Both the husband and their wife were sipping their own coffee. Hence, we have modifier issue here.

POE:
(A) sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

(B) sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed to be disoriented, she noticed: Incorrect.
1. This choice repeats the same modification error of choice A. Now it suggests that he (Clark) was drinking both their coffees.
2. Also two independent clauses are joined just by a comma. This leads to run-on sentence.

(C) as they sipped their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented: Correct.

(D) as they were sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed, she noticed, disoriented: Incorrect. Same run-on sentence error as in choice B.

(E) he seemed disoriented, she noticed, sipping their coffee the next morning: Incorrect.
1. This choice also repeats the run-on sentence error.
2. Verb-ing modifier “sipping…” is now modifying the preceding clause, suggesting that she (Florence) was drinking her coffee as well as her husband’s coffee.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team,  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2012, 08:32
Hi @bradfris,

When two independent clauses are not connected properly to each other, they are called run-on sentence. The most common instance is two ICs connected just by a comma. For example:

I can’t come to your house now, I am doing my homework.

Both the sentences here are independent clauses. They can stand by their own. We can very well use a full stop instead of the comma in this sentence. Joining these two sentences with comma leads to a run-on structure.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2018, 05:30
egmat wrote:
Hi @bradfris,

When two independent clauses are not connected properly to each other, they are called run-on sentence. The most common instance is two ICs connected just by a comma. For example:

I can’t come to your house now, I am doing my homework.

Both the sentences here are independent clauses. They can stand by their own. We can very well use a full stop instead of the comma in this sentence. Joining these two sentences with comma leads to a run-on structure.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi e-gmat team, abhimahna,
Can you please explain me why there are two independent clauses
IC, BUT DC, IC. Two independent clauses in the same sentence ?
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Re: Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2018, 09:43
Nightmare007 wrote:
Hi e-gmat team, abhimahna,
Can you please explain me why there are two independent clauses
IC, BUT DC, IC. Two independent clauses in the same sentence ?


Hey Nightmare007 ,

Yes, it is perfectly fine to have two IC within a sentence provided they follow the rule perfectly.

Here is a great article that should help you. https://gmatclub.com/forum/unmasking-in ... 60401.html

I hope that helps. :-)
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Re: Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2018, 23:50
Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked steadily and efficiently through the night, but sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented.

(A) sipping their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented
(B) sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed to be disoriented, she noticed
(C) as they sipped their coffee the next morning, she noticed that he seemed disoriented
(D) as they were sipping their coffee the next morning, he seemed, she noticed, disoriented
(E) he seemed disoriented, she noticed, sipping their coffee the next morning[/quote]

Answer C.


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Re: Clark and Florence Wallace, a husband-and-wife medical team, worked &nbs [#permalink] 24 Jun 2018, 23:50
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