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Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2016, 23:09
powellmittra wrote:
If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table

What does the statement above means? specially the "Except one". I got tricked by it thinking that 22 (23 except 1 or 22-1) members were seated with 6 members at each table :(


hi

Quote:
If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table

this tells us that if there were x tables, x-1 tables had 6 members on those table and <6, say y, on the ONE remaining table..
MEANS - y is the remainder when you divide TOTAL by 6
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Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2016, 14:10
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5

let m=number of members
assume (m-3)/4-(m-3)/5=1
m=23
23/6 gives a remainder of 5
E

Last edited by gracie on 13 Sep 2017, 18:17, edited 1 time in total.

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Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2016, 10:02
Was it coincidence that I got this answer right?

I thought X= 29 since 10<X<40. ( 39-11+1)
So, if each table has 6 members and 1 table has less than that. Then,
29/6 will leave a remainder 5.

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2016, 04:34
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Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5


Question boils down to the following:

\(10 < X < 40\), and

\(x = 3 (mod_4)\) ---> dividing X into groups of 4 leaves remainder 3

\(x = 3 (mod_5)\) ---> dividing X into groups of 5 leaves same remainder 3

Then:

\(x = LCM (4, 5) + 3 = 23\)\(\)

Now we need to divide X into groups of 6 and find the remainder for the last table.

\(\frac{23}{6}\) -----> \(rem = 5\)

Answer E.

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2016, 01:09
This One is a Great Official Question.
Here is my solution =>
Let the number of members be N
As per Question
N=> (10,23)
N=4k+3
N=5k'+3
Combing the above two Equations => N=20k''+3
N=> 3,23,43,63,83... But N=> (10,23)
So N must be 23
Hence N=23
Now 23=> 6k+5
So 5 members will be left out when 6 members are arranged on each table.
Hence E

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Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2017, 14:30
Hello All,

1. Members sit as 4m + 3 ( 4 members on all table and 3 on last table)
2. Members sit as 5n + 3 ( 5 members on all table and 3 on last table)

Since 10 < X < 40 - Range of Members.

So only possible number which is divisible by 4 & 5 is 20 and adding 3. Total members are 23. So now sitting with 6 members per table we have
3. 6m + 5 = 23. So remainder on last table are 5

Answer is E. :-D
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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2017, 03:43
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Let,the x represents the members.

Now, the members are more than 10 but fewer than 40.

so, 10
By following the question, we get

(1) Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table & 4 members at each of the others.

so, x = 3+ 4 m

or x-3 = 4 m. -----(A)


(2) Again, sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table & 5 members at each of the other tables.

so, x = 3+ 5 n

or, x-3 = 5n. -------(B)



here, ( x-3) is the multiple of 4 & 5. or 4*5= 20.


But there are also many multiple of 4 & 5

i. e 40,60,80. ....

but if we take another multiple of 4 & 5 then it will break the condition 10
so, here x= 20 satisfies the above condition.


Now, x-3 = 20

or, x = 23.


Following the question, dividing 23 by 6



23/6

here, quotient = 3
Remainder = 5.

so, the answer is 5..

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2017, 03:47
Let,the x represents the members.

Now, the members are more than 10 but fewer than 40.

so, 10
By following the question, we get

(1) Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table & 4 members at each of the others.

so, x = 3+ 4 m

or x-3 = 4 m. -----(A)


(2) Again, sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table & 5 members at each of the other tables.

so, x = 3+ 5 n

or, x-3 = 5n. -------(B)



here, ( x-3) is the multiple of 4 & 5. or 4*5= 20.


But there are also many multiple of 4 & 5

i. e 40,60,80. ....

but if we take another multiple of 4 & 5 then it will break the condition 10
so, here x= 20 satisfies the above condition.


Now, x-3 = 20

or, x = 23.


Following the question, dividing 23 by 6



23/6

here, quotient = 3
Remainder = 5.

so, the answer is 5..

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2017, 10:33
from the beginning we know the the number of people sitting by several tables is devisible by 4 and 5, hence it is multiply of 20. There is only one multiply of 20 in the range. 20+3 (since 3 people always set separately)
23/6=3tables +5 left
5 is the answer (E)

Be careful with adding 3 at the beginning!!!

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5


This is a nice remainder question in disguise.
For this question, we'll use a nice rule that that says:
If N divided by D leaves remainder R, then the possible values of N are R, R+D, R+2D, R+3D,. . . etc.
For example, if k divided by 5 leaves a remainder of 1, then the possible values of k are: 1, 1+5, 1+(2)(5), 1+(3)(5), 1+(4)(5), . . . etc.

Let N = the TOTAL number of members.

Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables...
With 4 members at each table, then N is multiple of 4
However, we still have one more table to consider.
Since the last table has 3 members, we know that N is 3 greater than a multiple of 4
In other words, when we divide N by 4, the remainder is 3
By the above rule, some possible values of N are: 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, etc
NOTE: I started at 11, since we're told that 10 < N < 49

Sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables
Using the same logic as above, this question tells us that, when we divide N by 5, the remainder is 3
By the above rule, some possible values of N are: 13, 18, 23, 28, 33, 38

Let's check the two results.
First we learned that N can equal 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 38
Next we learned that N can equal 13, 18, 23, 28, 33, 38
Once we check the OVERLAP, we can see that N equals 23

If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?
If N = 23, then we'll have 3 tables with 6 members and the remaining 5 members will sit at the other table.

Answer:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2017, 14:38
lcm of 4 & 5=20
the general number=20a+(20+3)=20a+23
(20a+23)/6
23/6 [a=0]
remainder=5
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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2017, 10:51
Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5



I just did the LCM of 5&4 +3 . So basically 20+3/6 . Not sure if this method will hold if the range of members was to change, but it worked on this instance.

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2017, 05:34
Bunuel wrote:
Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5


3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 4: x=4m+3.

3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 5: x=5n+3.

Thus x-3 is a multiple of both 4 and 5, so a multiple of 20. Therefore x is 3 more than a multiple of 20. Since 10<x<40, then x=23.

The remainder when 23 is divided by 6 is 5.

Answer: E.


Hi Bunuel,

I approached the question like this:

Total members is 40>M>10, so 29 members. Now if each table has 6 members, that is 29/6 then the last table would have 5 (29-24) members on the table. Is this approach right? I did the problem in less than a minute with this approach. Thanks in advance.

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2017, 05:42
SinhaS wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5


3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 4: x=4m+3.

3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 5: x=5n+3.

Thus x-3 is a multiple of both 4 and 5, so a multiple of 20. Therefore x is 3 more than a multiple of 20. Since 10<x<40, then x=23.

The remainder when 23 is divided by 6 is 5.

Answer: E.


Hi Bunuel,

I approached the question like this:

Total members is 40>M>10, so 29 members. Now if each table has 6 members, that is 29/6 then the last table would have 5 (29-24) members on the table. Is this approach right? I did the problem in less than a minute with this approach. Thanks in advance.


How did you get that there must be 29 members from 40>M>10? Does 29 members satisfy ANY of the conditions (3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables and 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables)?
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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2017, 05:48
Bunuel wrote:
SinhaS wrote:
Walkabout wrote:
Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes the members sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, and sometimes they sit at tables with 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables. If they sit at tables with 6 members at each table except one and fewer than 6 members at that one table, how many members will be at the table that has fewer than 6 members?

(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
(E) 5


3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 4: x=4m+3.

3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables, means that the total number of members is 3 more than a multiple of 5: x=5n+3.

Thus x-3 is a multiple of both 4 and 5, so a multiple of 20. Therefore x is 3 more than a multiple of 20. Since 10<x<40, then x=23.

The remainder when 23 is divided by 6 is 5.

Answer: E.


Hi Bunuel,

I approached the question like this:

Total members is 40>M>10, so 29 members. Now if each table has 6 members, that is 29/6 then the last table would have 5 (29-24) members on the table. Is this approach right? I did the problem in less than a minute with this approach. Thanks in advance.


How did you get that there must be 29 members from 40>M>10? Does 29 members satisfy ANY of the conditions (3 members at one table and 4 members at each of the other tables and 3 members at one table and 5 members at each of the other tables)?[/quote]

I think my approach was not the right way to solve this problem, I took there can be a max 29 members within the range. Although i came to the same answer, this solution is not right i believe.

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Re: Club X has more than 10 but fewer than 40 members. Sometimes   [#permalink] 09 Sep 2017, 05:48

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