GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 22 Mar 2019, 09:37

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Nov 2014
Posts: 60
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 19 Jul 2017, 05:49
1
8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

37% (01:48) correct 63% (02:01) wrong based on 227 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' refers not just to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but also to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment

Here is my understanding below:

Option A: IDIOM error - not just -- BUT is missing; PRONOUN error - "it" ; COMPARISONS : Okay, first option seems to convey that 'the president of priest' is the one who has achieved enlightenment and hence it's wrong.
However the CORRECT ANSWER is mentioned D.

I Cannot identify how B,C And E are wrong on account of COMPARISON PROCESS?

Lets pick B:
I see that in start of the clause : "term" is missing. Is this the only reason this option will be wrong? Hiowever in correct answer D itself there is no use of 'term'.
Similarily, I cannot account for why C AND E are incorrect.

Help is much appreciated

Source: 800 SCORE.

Originally posted by ruchi857 on 02 May 2016, 21:46.
Last edited by sayantanc2k on 19 Jul 2017, 05:49, edited 4 times in total.
Edited the title
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Dec 2015
Posts: 39
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 May 2016, 23:22
1
ruchi857 wrote:
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment

Here is my understanding below:

Option A: IDIOM error - not just -- BUT is missing; PRONOUN error - "it" ; COMPARISONS : Okay, first option seems to convey that 'the president of priest' is the one who has achieved enlightenment and hence it's wrong.
However the CORRECT ANSWER is mentioned D.

I Cannot identify how B,C And E are wrong on account of COMPARISON PROCESS?

Lets pick B:
I see that in start of the clause : "term" is missing. Is this the only reason this option will be wrong? Hiowever in correct answer D itself there is no use of 'term'.
Similarily, I cannot account for why C AND E are incorrect.

Help is much appreciated

Source: 800 SCORE.


Not an expert but I got this one correct. If you could understand the meaning of the sentence it will be really easy to choose option D.

so let me try:

B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.

The sentence incorrectly suggests that the word President or Priest just like Buddha is not just a historical figure, but a type of person...........

C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment

If you understood the explanation for B you can identify the problem with option C. It makes a similar error.

E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment

Among other things option E makes the same mistake. Option E has other problems such as - "class of persons" should be a "class of person"

D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.

Correct - Uses correct modifiers and comparisons. clearly states the intended meaning.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 20 Aug 2015
Posts: 388
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V44
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2016, 03:20
ruchi857 wrote:
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.


A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment


B, C and E are wrong because they distort the meaning of the original sentence. They mean that Buddha is similar to president or priest.
Option A has other errors that you have mentioned.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Nov 2015
Posts: 9
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2016, 09:10
D cannot be the OA. D has several flaws:

(1) the construction not X buy Y is broken as you can see: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.

'just' and 'refers' cannot be parallel.

(2) D compares 'the word' to 'president'/'priest' which is nonsense.

=> D cannot be the OA.

I think E will be a better choice in this case.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 212
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jul 2017, 23:13
VP
VP
User avatar
D
Status: Learning
Joined: 20 Dec 2015
Posts: 1024
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Marketing
GMAT 1: 670 Q48 V36
GRE 1: Q157 V157
GPA: 3.4
WE: Engineering (Manufacturing)
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2017, 01:09
Imo E
It has correct comparison between words and it maintains parallelism.
D on the other hand compares the word Buddha with priest and president .This is a serious mistake as the comparison should be between words.
_________________

Please give kudos if you found my answers useful

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Jul 2012
Posts: 22
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2017, 02:28
a. just like is incorrect.
b just like is incorrect.
c. words...(i think it should be word 'president' or 'priest' ) entire class of people, those who have ...
just after people, those is not needed....it could be entire class of people who have....
d. seems correct.
e. but rather is redundant.
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 14 Nov 2014
Posts: 626
Location: India
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.76
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2017, 05:05
ruchi857 wrote:
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment


i am not convinced with any of answer choice..

A-- it is a fragment.
B-comparison issue ..president / priest is directly compared with word Buddha.
c- meaning issue ..
d- comparison is fine ..but lacks ||ism ...
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E-||ism issue ..refer is missing in second part of sentence

Expert please advice .
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Mar 2014
Posts: 5
Schools: ISB '19
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2017, 05:44
I also answered E, but after carefully going through the explanations provided, indeed it seems that E is distorting the meaning. Very nice question. Should be D
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2883
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2017, 04:52
sobby wrote:
ruchi857 wrote:
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment


i am not convinced with any of answer choice..

A-- it is a fragment.
B-comparison issue ..president / priest is directly compared with word Buddha.
c- meaning issue ..
d- comparison is fine ..but lacks ||ism ...
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E-||ism issue ..refer is missing in second part of sentence

Expert please advice .


Yes, D has a parallelism problem. The correct sentence could be:
The word 'Buddha' not just denotes the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but (also), like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
In such case two verbs "denotes" and "refers" would be in parallel.
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3621
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2017, 05:39
Please provide the OA for this question. I rejected option A, B and D. Down to C and E.

I think C has the problem 'those who have'.

So, I will go with E. Kindly confirm.
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.
New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here.

Current Student
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Sep 2016
Posts: 169
Location: India
GMAT 1: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 4
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2017, 04:51
ruchi857 wrote:
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - 'As above'
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment.
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment.
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment

Here is my understanding below:

Option A: IDIOM error - not just -- BUT is missing; PRONOUN error - "it" ; COMPARISONS : Okay, first option seems to convey that 'the president of priest' is the one who has achieved enlightenment and hence it's wrong.
However the CORRECT ANSWER is mentioned D.

I Cannot identify how B,C And E are wrong on account of COMPARISON PROCESS?

Lets pick B:
I see that in start of the clause : "term" is missing. Is this the only reason this option will be wrong? Hiowever in correct answer D itself there is no use of 'term'.
Similarily, I cannot account for why C AND E are incorrect.

Help is much appreciated

Source: 800 SCORE.



The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, it refers to a type of person, one who has achieved enlightenment, just like the term 'president' or 'priest'.

A - The correct idiom is "Not only X but also Y"
B - Just like president or priest, the word 'buddha' denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but a type of person, one who has achieved enligtenment. -'The word' is not like president or priest. Modifier error
C - The word 'Buddha', similar to the words 'president' or 'priest', denotes not just the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but an entire class of people, those who have achieved enlightenment -Incorrect use of pronoun 'THOSE'
D - The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha Gautama, but, like 'president' or 'priest', refers to a type of person, - in this case, one who has achieved enlightenment. -Correct!
E - Like the word 'president' or the word 'priest', the word 'Buddha' does not just refer to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama, but rather to a class of persons, who have achieved enlightenment - The word president and priest do not refer to Siddhartha Gautam

_________________

Desperately need 'KUDOS' !!

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2883
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2017, 05:47
abhimahna wrote:
Please provide the OA for this question. I rejected option A, B and D. Down to C and E.

I think C has the problem 'those who have'.

So, I will go with E. Kindly confirm.


In E the word "just" is misplaced - "just" should come before "to the historical figure Siddhartha Gautama" to maintain parallelism with "but rather to a class of persons".
Another problem is the wrong usage of "but rather" - usage of "but rather" implies that the word "Budhha" does NOT refer to the historical person - this meaning is wrong: The word "Buddhha" DOES refer to the hiostorical person and in addition a class of persons. Instead of "but rather", the phrase "but also" should be used.
Rectified the errors and added OA.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Sep 2018
Posts: 53
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2019, 03:42
Both options A and B use the phrase ‘just like’. This is considered too informal for the GMAT. C and E both distort the meaning of the original sentence.

D is the right answer.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha   [#permalink] 08 Mar 2019, 03:42
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The word 'Buddha' denotes not just the historical figure, Siddhartha

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.