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Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights ab

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Joined: 16 May 2016
Posts: 199
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, International Business
Schools: ESSEC '21 (A$)
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V38
GPA: 3.5
WE: Analyst (Consulting)
Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights ab  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 19:53
1
6
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

78% (02:03) correct 22% (01:58) wrong based on 116 sessions

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Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights about the propensity of a country to go into a war. Over the past 30 years, the countries that maintained the highest military strengths were also more aggressively involved in a higher number of wars. Moreover, the likelihood of getting aggressively involved in a war increased for countries whose military strength increased significantly during this period. Since there was no major world-wide war phenomenon in the recent past, it is likely that an increased military strength causes the increase in aggressive behavior and the higher involvement in wars.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

A.The data doesn’t distinguish between the countries that were consistently involved in war and the countries that were involved in more wars during the beginning and end of the 30-year period.
B. Some countries cited in the data were rarely involved in any war
C.Data shows that none of the countries that had zero increase in military strength showed any increase in their involvement in wars.
D.Situations that trigger an increase in military strength such as political tensions with neighboring countries are also likely to increase a country’s propensity to become involved in wars.
E.Data related to some of these countries is available only for a partial duration out of the 30-year period

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Re: Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights ab  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2018, 05:08
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The answer is C.

Logical approach:
We are looking for something which will strengthen the argument that the correlation between military strength and war implies causation. One way to do this would be providing data on an additional, similar correlation. Another would be to provide evidence on the absence of such a correlation in the opposite case: no military strength - no war. This is exactly what C tells us - our answer!

Alternative approach - using the answers:

A.The data doesn’t distinguish between the countries that were consistently involved in war and the countries that were involved in more wars during the beginning and end of the 30-year period. either irrelevant or weakens - it's not a good thing that the data isn't specific
B. Some countries cited in the data were rarely involved in any war too general - which countries? if it's the ones with military strength this would weaken
C.Data shows that none of the countries that had zero increase in military strength showed any increase in their involvement in wars. strengthens! this is an additional data point for the claim that military strength is the cause for war
D.Situations that trigger an increase in military strength such as political tensions with neighboring countries are also likely to increase a country’s propensity to become involved in wars. weakens - this provides an alternative solution to the one we are trying to prove
E.Data related to some of these countries is available only for a partial duration out of the 30-year period weakens - the data being limited is surely a bad thing for our claim
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Re: Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights ab   [#permalink] 26 Oct 2018, 05:08
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Data related to the past 30 years reveals some interesting insights ab

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