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Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2014, 09:45
+1 A

Statement:- "Deep tillage is even more deleterious to the world's topsoil supply than previously believed..."

A. Topsoil erosion does not make farmers want to till more deeply.
B. In deep-tillage farming, the deeper one tills, the greater the susceptibility to topsoil erosion. -"...farmers who till deeply are ten times more likely to lose topsoil to erosion than are farmers who use no-till methods.."
C. Tilling by any method other than deep tillage is not a viable option. - "...using other topsoil aeration techniques, to incorporate no-till methods..."
D. The most expensive farming methods employ topsoil aeration techniques other than deep tillage. - Paragraph does not discuss cost.
E. On average, topsoil that is no-tilled is more aerated than topsoil that is tilled deeply. - "...farmers who till deeply are ten times more likely to lose topsoil to erosion than are farmers who use no-till methods.."
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Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2014, 14:33
My 2 cents

-- Conclusion is stated by the author..... "Farmers must strive to incorporate No-till methods"
a) Negated - "Topsoil erosion does make farmers want to till more deeply"....so what ? Still the conclusion stated by author is not weakened that "Farmers must strive to incorporate No-till methods", The conclusion stated by author still holds good that topsoil erosion is bad and farmers must use no till methods
b) Its already stated in the passage
c) correct - if negated, There are some other methods other than "no-till" methods that will give the same effect.

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2014, 19:30
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:

Responding to a pm:

The argument is about what the farmers should do and not about what they want to do. Hence option (A) is out of scope.

Premises:
Deep tillage causes top soil erosion.
Farmers who till deeply are 10 times more likely to lose top soil than farmers who don't till.

Conclusion:
Farmers should use no till methods for top soil aeration.

Look at the last sentence: Results like these make it clear that farmers who now till deeply should strive, by using other topsoil aeration techniques, to incorporate no-till methods instead.
This tell us that tilling is a 'top soil aeration technique'. Tilling deeply is bad so farmers should use no till methods. The author has jumped from deep tilling to no till. He says that just don't till at all since deep tilling is bad for top soil. He assumes that there are no methods of tilling (which may not be bad for top soil) other than deep tilling.

Therefore, the assumption of the author is "Tilling by any method other than deep tillage is not a viable option."

Answer (C)


So Karishma would my understanding be correct that between the spectrum of deep tilling method ( say 100 % tilling) to a no till method ( 0%) , there is no other viable method and thus this is the assumption ?

The reason I opted for A was that deep soil tilling is leading to a negative feedback in the soil ecosystem and the farmer is constrained to till deeper for next crop so that , say , all the nutrients etc are available to the second crop. In other words deep tilling in crop # 1 is aggravating the condition of soil , thereby compelling the farmer to dig deeper for crop#2

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2014, 19:57
himanshujovi wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:

Responding to a pm:

The argument is about what the farmers should do and not about what they want to do. Hence option (A) is out of scope.

Premises:
Deep tillage causes top soil erosion.
Farmers who till deeply are 10 times more likely to lose top soil than farmers who don't till.

Conclusion:
Farmers should use no till methods for top soil aeration.

Look at the last sentence: Results like these make it clear that farmers who now till deeply should strive, by using other topsoil aeration techniques, to incorporate no-till methods instead.
This tell us that tilling is a 'top soil aeration technique'. Tilling deeply is bad so farmers should use no till methods. The author has jumped from deep tilling to no till. He says that just don't till at all since deep tilling is bad for top soil. He assumes that there are no methods of tilling (which may not be bad for top soil) other than deep tilling.

Therefore, the assumption of the author is "Tilling by any method other than deep tillage is not a viable option."

Answer (C)


So Karishma would my understanding be correct that between the spectrum of deep tilling method ( say 100 % tilling) to a no till method ( 0%) , there is no other viable method and thus this is the assumption ?

The reason I opted for A was that deep soil tilling is leading to a negative feedback in the soil ecosystem and the farmer is constrained to till deeper for next crop so that , say , all the nutrients etc are available to the second crop. In other words deep tilling in crop # 1 is aggravating the condition of soil , thereby compelling the farmer to dig deeper for crop#2


Yes, since the author believes that deep tilling is bad, he concludes that no-till methods should be used hence assuming that tilling methods other than deep tilling are not viable.

As I said before, option (A) is out of scope of our argument. The author is discussing what should be done and why. He is not considering and hence not assuming what the farmers may want to do.
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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2015, 23:43
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2015, 05:57
Macsen wrote:
Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil supply than previously believed. For example, farmers who till deeply are ten times more likely to lose topsoil to erosion than are farmers who use no-till methods. Results like these make it clear that farmers who now till deeply should strive, by using other topsoil aeration techniques, to incorporate no-till methods instead.

The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

A. Topsoil erosion does not make farmers want to till more deeply.
B. In deep-tillage farming, the deeper one tills, the greater the susceptibility to topsoil erosion.
C. Tilling by any method other than deep tillage is not a viable option.
D. The most expensive farming methods employ topsoil aeration techniques other than deep tillage.
E. On average, topsoil that is no-tilled is more aerated than topsoil that is tilled deeply.



Explanation:

The conclusion of the argument is that farmers who now till deeply should use no-till methods. For this to be true(that "no-till"methods are the only viable option) there should not be any other tilling method.In other words,if there is any other tilling method,farmers need not incorporate no-till methods in which case the conclusion fails.

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2015, 21:24
Macsen wrote:
Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil supply than previously believed. For example, farmers who till deeply are ten times more likely to lose topsoil to erosion than are farmers who use no-till methods. Results like these make it clear that farmers who now till deeply should strive, by using other topsoil aeration techniques, to incorporate no-till methods instead.

The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

A. Topsoil erosion does not make farmers want to till more deeply.
B. In deep-tillage farming, the deeper one tills, the greater the susceptibility to topsoil erosion.
C. Tilling by any method other than deep tillage is not a viable option.
D. The most expensive farming methods employ topsoil aeration techniques other than deep tillage.
E. On average, topsoil that is no-tilled is more aerated than topsoil that is tilled deeply.


I can confirm that OA is C. This is an LSAT question.

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2017, 03:44
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Deep tillage is even more deliterious to the world's topsoil   [#permalink] 29 Oct 2017, 03:44

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