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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the

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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2015, 02:37
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A
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55% (01:32) correct 45% (01:47) wrong based on 452 sessions

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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the population of the nation is, on average, plumper than was the population 30 years ago. By 2008, the average adult is 11 pounds heavier than was the average adult in 1978.

Which of the following is an assumption underlying the argument above regarding today's average adult?

A) Today's average adult is not substantially overweight.
B) Today's average adult is trying to lose weight.
C) Today's average adult eats healthier food than did the average adult of the past.
D) Today's average adult is not older than was the average adult of the past.
E) Today's average adult is not significantly taller than was the average adult of the past.

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Re: Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2015, 23:59
C seems to be the correct answer !
Can anyone explain why E is the OA? How does being taller affect the weight? :|
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New post 31 Aug 2015, 00:18
pria131 wrote:
C seems to be the correct answer !
Can anyone explain why E is the OA? How does being taller affect the weight? :|


On average, a person gains weight as it gains height. If you compare two perfectly normal people who are, set aside their height, about the same, the taller person will weigh more.

As E says "the average adult is not significantly taller than was the average adult of the past", it implies that people were the same and therefore the only possible gain of weight has been due to less sport or more unhealthy food etc.
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Re: Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 19:36
I am in difficulty in applying negation technique in E.

E) Today's average adult is not significantly taller than was the average adult of the past.
Negated Statement: Today's average adult is significantly taller than was the average adult of the past.

This negated statement is also supporting the conclusion. So how it becomes assumption? Am I missing something?
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Re: Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2017, 00:10
Hi,

I have been able to identify the jump that the author makes from media's motivation for fitness to average nation still being plumper as compared to 30 years ago. I can't seem to negate option D. Similar to option E if we assume that taller people have generally more weight then older people generally have more weight as well (D).

Can I get some help here please ?

Thanks in advance.
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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 May 2017, 05:12
altairahmad wrote:
Hi,

I have been able to identify the jump that the author makes from media's motivation for fitness to average nation still being plumper as compared to 30 years ago. I can't seem to negate option D. Similar to option E if we assume that taller people have generally more weight then older people generally have more weight as well (D).

Can I get some help here please ?

Thanks in advance.


Hi,
I hope I can help you resolve your concern. If not, then feel free to response back.

The author jump from premise (weight data in 2008 and in 1979) to conclusion (nowadays people are plumper than people in the past)
We all agree that in order to assess whether a person looks fat or not, 2 main factors that are weight and height should be considered. (If you've ever heard of BMI - Body Mass Index, then you may feel more confident on this option :D). That's why (E) is undoubtedly a good contender.

Regarding option (D), well it seems reasonable to expect that a 15 year-old child should weigh more than an 8 year-old kid. But when it comes to other ranges of age, this is not necessarily the case. For example, a man at 50 may not weigh more than he did at 38. Do u agree with that?

Originally posted by Lucy Phuong on 27 May 2017, 04:15.
Last edited by Lucy Phuong on 27 May 2017, 05:12, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 27 May 2017, 04:22
Conclusion: Despite the fitness people, people are fatty.

Premise: They have more weight now than in 1978

Pre thinking: Author is assuming the increase in weight is only by getting fatty. If we say there are not fatty and the increase in weight is because of some other reasons, the argument will be broken.

A) Today's average adult is not substantially overweight. --> "substantially overweight" is ruled out. This doesn't tell us whether they is any change in their weight.

B) Today's average adult is trying to lose weight. --> What he/she is trying to do is irrelevant.

C) Today's average adult eats healthier food than did the average adult of the past. --> But still they have an increase in weight. this no where tells us healthier food would mean there won't be any increase in weight. May be they are eating overdose. If not, they why are they getting fatty.

D) Today's average adult is not older than was the average adult of the past. --> Age has no link with weight. We cannot assume that people with age will loose/increase their weight.

E) Today's average adult is not significantly taller than was the average adult of the past. --> Ok, Height does impact the weight. It means if they are taller but not fatty there could be a chance for them to have extra weight. Hence, correct option.

Clearly E is the correct answer here.
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Re: Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2017, 22:12
Isn't it wonderful how a slight difference in words helps you understand. Thanks for the explanation.

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Re: Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2018, 02:44
abhimahna wrote:
Conclusion: Despite the fitness people, people are fatty.

Premise: They have more weight now than in 1978

Pre thinking: Author is assuming the increase in weight is only by getting fatty. If we say there are not fatty and the increase in weight is because of some other reasons, the argument will be broken.

A) Today's average adult is not substantially overweight. --> "substantially overweight" is ruled out. This doesn't tell us whether they is any change in their weight.

B) Today's average adult is trying to lose weight. --> What he/she is trying to do is irrelevant.

C) Today's average adult eats healthier food than did the average adult of the past. --> But still they have an increase in weight. this no where tells us healthier food would mean there won't be any increase in weight. May be they are eating overdose. If not, they why are they getting fatty.

D) Today's average adult is not older than was the average adult of the past. --> Age has no link with weight. We cannot assume that people with age will loose/increase their weight.

E) Today's average adult is not significantly taller than was the average adult of the past. --> Ok, Height does impact the weight. It means if they are taller but not fatty there could be a chance for them to have extra weight. Hence, correct option.

Clearly E is the correct answer here.


Hi abhimahna, may be become fatty lead to more weight and height. in that case, still fatty leads to increase in weight. How is the argument is broken down? Please help
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New post 28 Feb 2018, 03:27
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Hi abhimahna, may be become fatty lead to more weight and height. in that case, still fatty leads to increase in weight. How is the argument is broken down? Please help


Hey hellosanthosh2k2 ,

The highlighted below is an extra parameter you are adding to the argument and this is not allowed. One should always stick to the scope of the argument. This extra parameter actually weakens the argument because it raises the concern whether it was fatty things or the height that led to the increase.

"may be become fatty lead to more weight and height"

I hope that makes sense. :)
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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2018, 03:35
abhimahna wrote:
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Hi abhimahna, may be become fatty lead to more weight and height. in that case, still fatty leads to increase in weight. How is the argument is broken down? Please help


Hey hellosanthosh2k2 ,

The highlighted below is an extra parameter you are adding to the argument and this is not allowed. One should always stick to the scope of the argument. This extra parameter actually weakens the argument because it raises the concern whether it was fatty things or the height that led to the increase.

"may be become fatty lead to more weight and height"

I hope that makes sense. :)


Hi abhimahna.

I was referring to this scenario.
X(more fatty) -> Y(more weight)
I understood your explanation as, Z(increase in height) -> Y (more weight) and not X -> Y

My concern is, maybe Y(more height) didnt lead to Z, X lead to both Y, Z . I mean to say increase in height is not the reason for increase in weight, rather X is still the reason for Y. I am trying to disconnect the relation between Y and Z that you had explained by saying that maybe X is the reason for both Y and Z.

Thanks.
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Despite the relentless pursuit of fitness portrayed by the media, the  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2018, 03:58
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Hi abhimahna.

I was referring to this scenario.
X(more fatty) -> Y(more weight)
I understood your explanation as, Z(increase in height) -> Y (more weight) and not X -> Y

My concern is, maybe Y(more height) didnt lead to Z, X lead to both Y, Z . I mean to say increase in height is not the reason for increase in weight, rather X is still the reason for Y. I am trying to disconnect the relation between Y and Z that you had explained by saying that maybe X is the reason for both Y and Z.

Thanks.


Hey hellosanthosh2k2 ,

I think you are missing the rules of Cause and Effect arguments.

Whenever an effect has happened in the past, there are only three assumptions for an argument X --> Y

1. Alternate Cause(Z)
2. Y --> X (aka reverse Causation)
3. X happens before Y.

Now, you are trying to change the original argument by saying X --> Y and X --> Z. This is strictly against the rule. I don't care what else X leads to. I am bothered only about X --> Y. Hence, I won't go beyond that.

Does that make sense?
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