It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 20:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 30 Dec 2015
Posts: 90

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 153

GPA: 3.92
WE: Engineering (Aerospace and Defense)
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2017, 09:03
sayantanc2k wrote:
sleepynut wrote:
Hi expert,
I couldn't comprehend the usage of "as well as emitting".What emitting refer to?
At first,I think the sentence require another verb:emit.

Please help clarify
Thanks :-)


"Emitting...." is a present participle modifier. Comma + present participle modifier can refer to the subject of the previous clause or the entire previous clause. Here "Emitting..." refers to "Diesel engines" (subject of the previous clause).

"As well as" is not a substitute for "and" - it cannot be used to join two verbs. As a rule, remember that the verb after "as well as" comes in present participle (verb+ing) form. Hence it would be wrong to say "as well as emit".


As indicated by the above post: 'As well as' is one of the most frequent misused conjunction. 'As well as' can NEVER be a synonym for 'and.'

To add some more details:
You can also have a NOUN after 'as well as'; In this case 'as well as' behaves as an additive phrase and the subject/noun that follows 'as well as' does not become a part of the main subject.
Jeff, as well as Rebecca, has left for the day.
Students ,as well as the principal, were busy helping the hurt animal.

Verbs after 'as well as' can only come in ING form
Rebecca is happy as well as dancing on the stage.
_________________

If you analyze enough data, you can predict the future.....its calculating probability, nothing more!


Last edited by colorblind on 25 Aug 2017, 17:46, edited 2 times in total.

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 153

Top Contributor
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4289

Kudos [?]: 7911 [0], given: 364

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2017, 03:29
Top Contributor
Inak:
Your version of the question seems to be a shoddy and casual simulation of the original official question, leading to utter confusion. Let us see step by step, why this question ought not to be practiced.

Conceptually, one can say far less of CO2 because it refers to the quantity of gas; on the other hand, one cannot say far less of other greenhouse gasses. One has to use the comparative adjective ' fewer' to denote countable nouns. This is a phenomenal error and has been carried through all the five choices.
Let's leave alone the mistakes in each of the other choices.
When such substantially differing questions are posted, we must clearly name the source as otherwise, this is taking cover under another genuine GMAT Prep question. Alternately, you can make clear in the body that this is a substantially new question, and there would be then no need to merge the topics. I hope you can see my point
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509


Last edited by daagh on 11 May 2017, 03:59, edited 1 time in total.

Kudos [?]: 7911 [0], given: 364

Top Contributor
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4289

Kudos [?]: 7911 [0], given: 364

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2017, 03:57
Top Contributor
It is an idiomatic usage that when we use a verb after 'as well as', we always use and verb+ing form. Emitting is a gerund here because as well as is preposition rather than conjunction in this context and a preposition is always followed by a noun of an action noun 'gerund'. A question of parallelism arises only when a coordinate conjunction is involved and not with a prepositional phrase.

For further info, pl. look at the following link.
http://site.uit.no/english/grammar/aswellas/
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7911 [0], given: 364

VP
VP
avatar
S
Joined: 09 Jun 2010
Posts: 1403

Kudos [?]: 159 [0], given: 916

Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2017, 01:33
tejal777 wrote:
. Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.

A. of comparable size , as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

B. of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

C. of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

D. that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

E. that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


"as well as" normally is used as a conjunction, a word which connect two similar things.
english as well as french is hard language.

but in this problem, "as well as" can work as a preposition, which stand before a noun or doing to do the role of adverb (in this problem) or adjective.

choice A show this phrase as a preposition.

in the pattern
main clause+comma+ preposition+doing

only a few preposition can be put in to. not all preposition can be put into. for example

I learn english because of willing to go to US

is a wrong sentence
_________________

visit my facebook to help me.
on facebook, my name is: thang thang thang

Kudos [?]: 159 [0], given: 916

2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Oct 2016
Posts: 1

Kudos [?]: 19 [2], given: 4

Location: India
Schools: ISB '19
GPA: 3.5
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 07:51
2
This post received
KUDOS
17
This post was
BOOKMARKED
I feel its A
‘emitting....' is an adverbial modifier correctly modifying the phrase 'Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel ...' .

Kudos [?]: 19 [2], given: 4

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jul 2012
Posts: 17

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2017, 11:16
GMATNinja souvik101990 mikemcgarry

Please have a go at this Q. Looking forward to your explanation.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
S
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2311

Kudos [?]: 9046 [1], given: 335

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2017, 12:55
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
ravjai81 wrote:
GMATNinja souvik101990 mikemcgarry

Please have a go at this Q. Looking forward to your explanation.



Hello ravjai81,

Here is how we at e-GMAT will solve this official problem.

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


Step 1: Understand the Intended Meaning:

The sentence presents comparison between two types of engines – engines that run on diesel and those that run on gasoline.
Why have they been compared? They have been compared because diesel engines:
i. burn as much as 30% less fuel.
ii. emit far fewer of those gases that are believed to be responsible for global warming.


Step 2: Find Grammatical Errors:

i. All the highlighted SV pairs are accounted for.

ii. Since the sentence presents general information about diesel engines use of simple present tense verb burn is correct. Use of have been implicated is also correct because there is no definite time period when these gases were implicated in global warning.

iii. The noun modifiers that correctly modifies the preceding noun entity the other gases.

iv. When attempting this question, many users treat as well as a parallel marker and hence look for an entity parallel to burn. Since emitting is not grammatically parallel to burn, they think that this options has a parallelism error.

However, that is not the case. Unlike and, as well as is not strictly a parallel marker even if joins two entities. Hence use of emitting is correct in this sentence. The noun entity emitting presents another action done by the diesel engines.

Hence, the original sentence does not seems to have any grammatical or/and logical error.


Step 3: Determine the Correct Answer:


Choice A: of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have: Grammatically and logically sound, so will hold on to it unless we get a better choice.


Choice B: of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect: Use of having been implicated is not correct because the usage seems to suggest that after being implicated, the other gases did something else. That something else is not mentioned in the sentence.


Choice C: of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have: Incorrect: Use of fewer for carbon dioxide is incorrect because carbon dioxide cannot be counted.


Choice D: that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect: This choice repeats the having been implicated of Choice B. Also, this option mentions nothing about the carbon dioxide emission.


Choice E: that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect. This choice retains both the errors of Choice D.


Hence, Choice A indeed is the correct answer choice.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Kudos [?]: 9046 [1], given: 335

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jul 2012
Posts: 17

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 23:00
Thanks egmat (Payal) for the detailed reply.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 135

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 325

Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2017, 02:56
tejal777 wrote:
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.

(A) of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have

(B) of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having

(C) of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have

(D) that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having

(E) that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having


in this problem, gmat play a beautiful game, the use of "as well as". this phrase is normally considered a conjuction which connect two similar words. but in this problem, it is a preposition which normally stand before noun and dose not need two similar words.

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 325

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 29 May 2016
Posts: 132

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 345

CAT Tests
Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2017, 01:03
egmat wrote:
ravjai81 wrote:
GMATNinja souvik101990 mikemcgarry

Please have a go at this Q. Looking forward to your explanation.



Hello ravjai81,

Here is how we at e-GMAT will solve this official problem.

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have been implicated in global warming.


Step 1: Understand the Intended Meaning:

The sentence presents comparison between two types of engines – engines that run on diesel and those that run on gasoline.
Why have they been compared? They have been compared because diesel engines:
i. burn as much as 30% less fuel.
ii. emit far fewer of those gases that are believed to be responsible for global warming.


Step 2: Find Grammatical Errors:

i. All the highlighted SV pairs are accounted for.

ii. Since the sentence presents general information about diesel engines use of simple present tense verb burn is correct. Use of have been implicated is also correct because there is no definite time period when these gases were implicated in global warning.

iii. The noun modifiers that correctly modifies the preceding noun entity the other gases.

iv. When attempting this question, many users treat as well as a parallel marker and hence look for an entity parallel to burn. Since emitting is not grammatically parallel to burn, they think that this options has a parallelism error.

However, that is not the case. Unlike and, as well as is not strictly a parallel marker even if joins two entities. Hence use of emitting is correct in this sentence. The noun entity emitting presents another action done by the diesel engines.

Hence, the original sentence does not seems to have any grammatical or/and logical error.


Step 3: Determine the Correct Answer:


Choice A: of comparable size, as well as emitting far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses that have: Grammatically and logically sound, so will hold on to it unless we get a better choice.


Choice B: of comparable size, as well as emit far less carbon dioxide gas and far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect: Use of having been implicated is not correct because the usage seems to suggest that after being implicated, the other gases did something else. That something else is not mentioned in the sentence.


Choice C: of comparable size, and also they emit far fewer carbon dioxide and other gasses that have: Incorrect: Use of fewer for carbon dioxide is incorrect because carbon dioxide cannot be counted.


Choice D: that have a comparable size, and also they emit far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect: This choice repeats the having been implicated of Choice B. Also, this option mentions nothing about the carbon dioxide emission.


Choice E: that have a comparable size, as well as emitting far fewer of the other gasses having: Incorrect. This choice retains both the errors of Choice D.


Hence, Choice A indeed is the correct answer choice.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha



Hi egmat / Shradhha, thanks for the detailed explanation, but can you please clarify how is dioxin countable in other OG problem and how ,here, carbon di oxide is non countable.

"Official Guide"
A report by the American Academy for the Advancement of Science has concluded that much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed comes from the incineration of wastes.

(A) much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed comes
(B) much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins that North Americans are exposed to come
(C) much of the dioxins that are currently uncontrolled and that North Americans are exposed to comes
(D) many of the dioxins that are currently uncontrolled and North Americans are exposed to come
(E) many of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed come


Is there any specific difference , which I am missing. I marked C as answer in gmat prep problem, because i thought dioxins , if countable as 1 dioxins , 2 dioxins , then Co2 is also gas , which can be countable. and same is the case with gases. can not we count gases. how many gases fewer than gases emitting by other engine

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 345

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 57

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 24

Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, International Business
Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2017, 05:30
took 30 Sec and the option is A.
Only I did is POE and removed all false options in few seconds.

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 24

Re: Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of   [#permalink] 17 Sep 2017, 05:30

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   [ 71 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Diesel engines burn as much as 30% less fuel than gasoline engines of

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.