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During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat

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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2019, 03:59
ashkg wrote:
During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.


(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in

(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in

(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms


SC30561.01

1:05 , E is my ans.

Here like is used as a conjunction. This is not preferred/correct usage of like.
I have copied this from a website :

Here is the rule:

Always use "like" as a preposition, never as a subordinating conjunction.

Historically, "like" has often been used as a subordinating conjunction, but in formal modern usage it is considered a definite no-no. The use of "like" as a conjunction had pretty nearly disappeared among the educated public, until a famous cigarette ad declared, "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should!"
The media have so popularized this once forbidden usage that one now hears it (and reads it) almost everywhere. But although it has become generally accepted in colloquial speech and informal writing, it is still considered questionable in formal writing. Anyone who wishes to be taken seriously as a writer needs to be very careful about unnecessarily violating this particular shibboleth, because it is seen by most teachers and editors not only as an error, but as another one of those really big errors.


Here are some examples of "like" used as a subordinating conjunction, along with corrected versions of the sentences.


EXAMPLES:


~My face felt like it had been set on fire.
My face felt as if it had been set on fire.
My face felt as though it had been set on fire.

~In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material like the teachers in high school do.
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material, as the teachers in high school do
In college the teachers don't spoonfeed you the material the way the teachers in high school do.

~When I was a freshman I studied like my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as if my life depended on it.
When I was a freshman I studied as though my life depended on it.

~Some people with only a modest income try to live like they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as if they were millionaires.
Some people with only a modest income try to live as though they were millionaires.

The same goes for using "like" as a conjunction. It has a respectable history of being used as a conjunction, and it is commonly used that way in informal speech and writing today. But it is not commonly used that way in the formal writing of educated people, and so I will not risk my reputation for it. The fact is, it is quite simple to avoid using "like" as a conjunction, just as it is to avoid comma splices.


HTH


Official Explanation

Logical predication; Parallelism

Each of the incorrect answer choices makes a faulty comparison.

A. Grammatically, the comparison here is between the buildup of ice . . . and the drop in water levels . . . on one hand and a spinning figure skater on the other. However, the appropriate comparison would be either between the figure skater and earth, or between the skater's rotation and the earth's rotation.

B. Grammatically, the comparison here is between the buildup of ice . . . and the drop in water levels . . . on one hand and the increased speed of a figure skater on the other. However, the appropriate comparison would be between the increased speed of earth's rotation and the increased speed of a figure skater. Furthermore, note that this answer choice nowhere suggests that the skater is spinning.

C. Grammatically, as in choice A, the comparison here is between the buildup of ice . . . and the drop in water levels . . . on one hand and a spinning figure skater on the other. However, the appropriate comparison would be either between the figure skater and earth, or between the skater's rotation and earth's rotation.

D. When just as is used to mean in the same way as, it must link two independent clauses. The clause beginning who increases speed . . . is a dependent clause.

E. Correct. In this version just as is appropriately used to create a comparison between the way the buildup of ice at the poles, along with the drop in water levels at the equator, increases the speed of earth's rotation and the way a figure skater increases the speed of her spin by drawing in her arms

The correct answer is E.
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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2019, 08:28
+1 E

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

Note: Beautiful Comparison question, Lets dig into it

Non underline part is basically showing action of buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator

Similarly we need action in the Underline Part

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in

Action is being compared to spinning figure skater

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in

Action is being compared to Increased Speed of a figure skater

(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in

Action is being compared to a figure skater

(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms

Action is being compared to a spinning figure skater

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms

Perfect , Actiojn is being compared to Action
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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2019, 15:11
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow down our options quickly so we know how to answer questions like this when they pop up on the GMAT! To begin, let's take a quick look at the question and highlight any major differences between the options in orange:

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in
(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in
(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in
(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms
(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms

After a quick glance over the options, there are a few things we can focus on to narrow down our choices:

1. like / as
2. whose speed increases / increased speed / who increases speed / increases speed
3. her arms are drawn in / her arms drawn in / drawing in her arms


Since #1 is an "either/or" split, let's start there. No matter which one we choose, we'll eliminate either 2 or 3 options rather quickly. There is a difference between how you use like vs. as:

Like = used as a preposition
As = used as a subordinating conjunction

Since we're looking for a word that joins two clauses together, we need to use a subordinating conjunction. Let's see how our options stack up:

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in
(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in
(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in
(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms
(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms

There you go - you can eliminate options A, B, & C because they use the preposition "like" instead of the conjunction "as" to join two clauses.

Now that we're only down to 2 options, let's see what differences we can find and explore those:


(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms

This option is INCORRECT because the clause after "as" MUST be an independent clause - and this one is missing a verb!

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms

This option is CORRECT because the clause after "as" is an independent clause, which is what we need when using conjunctions!


There you have it - option E is the correct choice! By focusing first on the "either/or" split, we eliminated several options that would have made this question much harder to solve quickly!


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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2020, 19:00
this is old question from og.
like is used to say that two things do the same action
as is used to say two actions are done in the same way.
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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2020, 19:08
TommyWallach's explanation is really useful. Thanks for the help!
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Re: During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in wat   [#permalink] 11 Apr 2020, 19:08

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