GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Oct 2018, 11:00

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2027
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Mar 2017, 09:20
Top Contributor
That's a huge question, Mo2men! We'll say a lot more about those sorts of issues in the next few weeks and months.

The short answer is that I've never been convinced that it's all that important to learn a whole ton of terminology for GMAT CR. Sure, you should definitely be able to very precisely identify a conclusion when you read the passage, but I don't think that labeling the rest of the passage with words like "premise" or "consideration" or "judgment" or "intermediary conclusion" is necessarily helpful if you're just trying to understand a nice, normal passage (weaken, strengthen, paradox, assumption, etc.).

And sure, those terms appear in the boldfaced CR questions, but they don't necessarily have super-technical definitions that you need to memorize. In this particular example, "judgment," "evidence," and "strategy" are everyday words with fairly standard definitions. "Consideration" isn't necessarily a word we use all the time, but it doesn't have any special definition here, either: it's just a thought or fact or idea that you're using to make form sort of decision. Nothing too technical.

Of course, everybody learns differently, and for a lot of GMAT test-takers, it's super-helpful to dive into this sort of terminology (conclusion, premise, evidence, etc.). I meet quite a few people who find the breakdowns in PowerScore or e-GMAT or MGMAT useful; I probably meet far more people who don't find the terminology useful at all, but again, everybody is different.

Bottom line: if you want to take a shot at one of those resources, go for it! Again, tons of people find them helpful. But for a really large number of successful GMAT test-takers, the terminology itself isn't worth studying. You just have to get really, really good at comprehending passages, understanding how the argument is structured, and picking up on the nuances of language in the question.

I hope this helps! And again, we'll have a lot more to say about this in upcoming posts. :)
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 1837
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Mar 2017, 09:40
GMATNinja wrote:
That's a huge question, Mo2men! We'll say a lot more about those sorts of issues in the next few weeks and months.

The short answer is that I've never been convinced that it's all that important to learn a whole ton of terminology for GMAT CR. Sure, you should definitely be able to very precisely identify a conclusion when you read the passage, but I don't think that labeling the rest of the passage with words like "premise" or "consideration" or "judgment" or "intermediary conclusion" is necessarily helpful if you're just trying to understand a nice, normal passage (weaken, strengthen, paradox, assumption, etc.).

And sure, those terms appear in the boldfaced CR questions, but they don't necessarily have super-technical definitions that you need to memorize. In this particular example, "judgment," "evidence," and "strategy" are everyday words with fairly standard definitions. "Consideration" isn't necessarily a word we use all the time, but it doesn't have any special definition here, either: it's just a thought or fact or idea that you're using to make form sort of decision. Nothing too technical.

Of course, everybody learns differently, and for a lot of GMAT test-takers, it's super-helpful to dive into this sort of terminology (conclusion, premise, evidence, etc.). I meet quite a few people who find the breakdowns in PowerScore or e-GMAT or MGMAT useful; I probably meet far more people who don't find the terminology useful at all, but again, everybody is different.

Bottom line: if you want to take a shot at one of those resources, go for it! Again, tons of people find them helpful. But for a really large number of successful GMAT test-takers, the terminology itself isn't worth studying. You just have to get really, really good at comprehending passages, understanding how the argument is structured, and picking up on the nuances of language in the question.

I hope this helps! And again, we'll have a lot more to say about this in upcoming posts. :)


Thanks lot for your enlightening response.

Actually, I agree with you. Through my GMAT study, I realized that verbal is far from being math an d formulas, although I'm en engineer and love them :) . However, I want to learn them for only simple reason: only getting myself familiar with BF question terminologies without burning OG questions. I hat to memorize them as it is also waste of time inside the exam to memorize every term. In you opinion, would this be effective?

Thanks in advance for your help
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2027
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Mar 2017, 07:38
Top Contributor
Ooh, good question. One of the problems with the boldfaced questions is that we really don't have all that many official ones in the practice materials -- what, maybe a total of four or five in the OGs, plus a few more in the GMATPrep Question Pack? I haven't counted, but it's somewhere in that ballpark -- and that's not much. So I completely understand why you'd want to make the most of them, and maybe save them for a later stage of your studies.

Again, I'm not convinced that the terminology used in the boldfaced questions is all that technical, so I'm not sure that there's much that's worth memorizing. It's just that you don't want them to look totally unfamiliar, I guess. So you could spend some time in some of the books I mentioned above, and see if that helps. Or you can just deal with them when the time comes -- in theory, the terms are generally going to be things that you understand without any extra studying, it's just that they might feel a little foreign.

And here's the other option: try practicing with some official LSATs. They can be brutally difficult at times, but depending on your score goals, that might be a good thing for you. And something like 20-30% of the questions at least dabble in some "legalese" terminology that will feel a little bit like the boldfaced questions.

If you can kick butt on the LSAT CR (called "logical reasoning" on the LSAT) and RC, then the GMAT stuff will start to feel easier. And it should help a whole lot with the boldfaced questions -- we give most of our students an aggressive diet of LSAT practice, and very few end up having any troubles on the boldfaced CR when they get there.
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SVP
SVP
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 1719
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V33
GPA: 3.64
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Sep 2017, 17:49
E is wrong b/c E does not show the relation between 2 boldface.
B is out b/c of "judgement"
C and D are both incorrect.
Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3180
Premium Member
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Oct 2018, 02:32
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca &nbs [#permalink] 07 Oct 2018, 02:32

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   [ 45 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

During the past year, Pro-Tect Insurance Company’s total payouts on ca

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.