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Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in

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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2012, 14:54
A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2012, 10:59
Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
The sentence is trying to say early philosophers regarded someone's writing as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants and later view that someone as a teacher of evil. We should keep the active voice. With that in mind, B and E are out.

C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers. (seems awkward and should be switch to particularly in.....)

D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned. (Regarded...to be... is idiomatically incorrect)

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers. (Sentence is clear in its meaning and has the correct idiom, regarded...as...)
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2015, 03:31
Stuck between A & B and chose B.

Seems A is better choice ! Thanks for the info :)
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2016, 01:06
jitbec wrote:
Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.

A. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
B. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century did philosophers question the view of him as a teacher of evil.
C. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, in France and England particularly, considered Machiavelli’s The Prince as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned by philosophers.
D. Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, regarded Machiavelli’s The Prince to be a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants, and not until the 17th Century philosophers was the view of Machiavelli as a teacher of evil questioned.
E. Machiavelli’s The Prince was regarded as a collection of cynical precepts for tyrants by early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in France and England, and not until the 17th Century was the view of him as a teacher of evil questioned.


1.Pronouns CANNOT refer to possessive's. Pro+Noun can only refer to a noun. Eliminate B&E
2. Idiom Usage:
Consider X- Correct
Consider X as Y- Incorrect
Consider X to be Y- Incorrect

Regarded as X- Correct
Regard X to be Y- Incorrect

View X as Y-Correct ( This sentence does not mess with this idiom ).

Eliminate C&D

Thus correct answer is A.

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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2018, 21:17
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Re: Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in &nbs [#permalink] 01 Apr 2018, 21:17

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