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Early in the development of a new product line, the critical

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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2011, 07:57
D is clearly the winner
now why B and C fail -

(B) For most established companies, the development of new product lines is a relatively small part of the company’s total expenditure. and hence there is no need to assign a experienced manager to it. This weakens the argument


(C) The more talented a manager is, the less likely he or she is to be interested in undertaking the development of a new product line. and hence he will not show much interest in making the product a success. This also weakens the argument.
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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2011, 15:02
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Hey Mundasingh:

Thanks for the invite to weigh in! This is a fantastic example of why it's so critical to identify the conclusion of an argument before attacking the answer choices - a task that I don't think is typically taught all that well. While the author definitely does talk about talented managers typically NOT being assigned to development projects, his argument is that they SHOULD BE assigned to them. Ultimately, there are three ways to find a conclusion in one of these arguments:

THREE WAYS TO IDENTIFY THE CONCLUSION

1) Conclusion language (such as "therefore", "thus", "in conclusion", "so", etc.)

2) A call for action ("We should", "they must", etc.)

3) The effect of a cause-effect relationship (It is raining, so the parade will be cancelled. The rain causes the cancellation, so "the parade will be cancelled" is the conclusion)

3a) To better exemplify this, try the "Why Test". Facts in these arguments don't have a reason why. Why is it raining? It doesn't say. But it does give a reason "why" the parade will be cancelled - because it's raining. So "the parade will be canceled", because the argument provides a reason why, is a conclusion based upon existing facts.


So...given all that, the conclusion of this argument is "the best managers in a company should be assigned to development projects" - it has a call for action "SHOULD BE", and it passes the why test. Why should they be assigned to those projects? The passage says because "early in projects the critical resource is talent"; because "new ventures require a disproportionate degree of managerial skill"; etc. So the conclusion is "the best managers should be assigned to development projects".

B weakens that, giving a reason that they shouldn't be (it's a small portion of the company's operations).
C weakens that, giving a reason that they shouldn't be (they probably don't want to)
D strengthens it, giving another reason why they should be (we already know that they'll significantly improve the odds of the new project's success; D says that they'll also not really be missed in the regular operations)


I hope that helps - keep in mind that the conclusion is by far the most important part of any of these arguments, so take care in making sure that you identify and embrace it.
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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2011, 07:54
D it is. need to use negation to see that it strengthens the conclusion.
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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 12:01
The argument talks about talented managers, who are generally used in established high revenue product lines.
It also talks about the new product line(with relatively less revenue) which fails because of not having a good manager
to run it in the initial stages, as that is one of the important critical resources required to make a new idea successful.

Since we need an option, which most strengthens the author’s argument
The current revenue and profitability of an established product line can be maintained
even if the company’s best managers are assigned elsewhere(Option D)

provides the most support as it states that an average manager could manage the revenue and profitability
of an established product line.
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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 19:26
Akela wrote:
Early in the development of a new product line, the
critical resource is talent. New marketing ventures
require a degree of managerial skill disproportionate
to their short-term revenue prospects. Usually,
however, talented managers are assigned only to
established high-revenue product lines and, as a
result, most new marketing ventures fail. Contrary to
current practice, the best managers in a company
should be assigned to development projects.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens
the author’s argument?

(A) On average, new ventures under the direction
of managers at executive level survive no
longer than those managed by lower-ranking
managers.
(B) For most established companies, the
development of new product lines is a relatively
small part of the company’s total expenditure.
(C) The more talented a manager is, the less likely
he or she is to be interested in undertaking
the development of a new product line.
(D) The current revenue and profitability of an
established product line can be maintained
even if the company’s best managers are
assigned elsewhere.
(E) Early short-term revenue prospects of a new
product line are usually a good predictor of
how successful a product line will ultimately be.

Source: LSAT

Kudos if you like this post


This question provides a good example of the strengthen/weaken CR. Probable answers will have an extreme element. The OA (D) emphasizes the extreme case that even when the best managers are assigned elsewhere, the establish line where they are usually assigned usually still maintain profitability. Thus, if you are stuck in on a weaken/strengthen, look for the option with extremes that attack/ defends the argument.

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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2019, 13:13
noboru wrote:
Early in the development of a new product line, the critical resource is talent. New marketing ventures require a degree of managerial skill disproportionate to their short-term revenue prospects. Usually, however, talented managers are assigned only to established high-revenue product lines and, as a result, most new marketing ventures fail. Contrary to current practice, the best managers in a company should be assigned to development projects.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s argument?

(A) On average, new ventures under the direction of managers at executive level survive no longer than those managed by lower-ranking managers.

(B) For most established companies, the development of new product lines is a relatively small part of the company’s total expenditure.

(C) The more talented a manager is, the less likely he or she is to be interested in undertaking the development of a new product line.

(D) The current revenue and profitability of an established product line can be maintained even if the company’s best managers are assigned elsewhere.

(E) Early short-term revenue prospects of a new product line are usually a good predictor of how successful a product line will ultimately be.

Source: LSAT




If you negate D the argument breaks. Hence D is correct.

On the other hand E seems promising but actually is wrong because it does not state that any kind of short term revenues are an indicator of future success but its states that through the short term revenues you can predict HOW successful a product line can be.

for example 100$ short revenues could be an indicator of scarce success while 100000$ could be an indicator of huge success. The statement at hand does not tell us in which scenario we are so it is wrong
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Re: Early in the development of a new product line, the critical   [#permalink] 10 Oct 2019, 13:13

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