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MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2015, 02:45
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This post was
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http://blog.accepted.com/tag/mba-student-interviews/
This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Top Dog, a first-year student at MIT Sloan. (We first met Top Dog last summer – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: It's been more than a year since we last spoke – can you bring us up to speed? At that time you were preparing to reapply to b-school. So....did you get in??

Top Dog: Haha. Yes, I'm pleased to say the whole application process went more or less according to plan! I got offers from INSEAD and MIT Sloan but was dinged by Wharton after spending the summer on their waitlist.

Accepted: How did you decide between MIT and INSEAD? How was MIT Sloan a better fit for you?

Top Dog: It took me longer than I expected to decide between INSEAD and MIT Sloan. In the end I'm not even sure I know exactly what decided it. All I can say is that, deep down, I just knew that MIT was the right place for me, especially as a career switcher with a big interest in entrepreneurship.

Since I made the decision and arrived on campus in August I've just been blown away by my awesome classmates, the sense of exciting things happening all the time and the incredible resources available to help me make my next move.

Accepted: As someone who was dinged on your first try, can you share some advice to our readers on how to deal with getting dinged and tips for picking yourself up and reapplying? 

Top Dog: For me the ding experience had a few different emotions: denial (I'd spent so long preparing for it, surely someone had made a mistake!?); anger (against the admissions system and how unfair it was); despair (is this the end of the road for me, after all that effort!?); and then the fightback, when I realised that I still really wanted to go to b-school and just had to do it.

Anyone who's thinking of reapplying needs to take a critical look at their applications and be honest about where they took short cuts. It definitely won't work to rehash your previous essays, you need to get help from friends, peers, managers, anyone who can give you fresh perspective on your resume, essays and interview strategy.

Be sensible when you choose your target b-schools, research them like crazy (and if you're applying to schools that dinged you last time make sure you have a compelling story about why you're re-applying and why things are different this time).

Accepted: Have you ever lived in the U.S. before? Are you excited to be living in Boston for the next few years?

Top Dog: I used to cover some clients in the US but had never spent more than a couple of weeks here until now. Boston is a beautiful city, there's no doubt about it! And then there's the prevalence of tech and start-up opportunities everywhere around campus, it's really opened my eyes to a new career and convinced me to move into that space when I graduate.

Speaking of moving countries, I wrote a comprehensive guide for planning your move overseas which you can find here.

Accepted: Do you think you'll move back to Europe post-MBA? Do you have any post-MBA plans? 

Top Dog: My goal is to do my summer internship either in a large tech firm or at a start-up. I'm already working toward this goal and will hopefully use that experience in the same sector or co-founding a start-up when I graduate. I'm keeping my options open but really see the US as the best place to achieve those goals, in the short term at least.

Europe is a lot less exciting for me but it does help not to have to worry about those visa issues, so you never know!

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 admissions tips with our readers?

Top Dog: Sure!

1. Be prepared! There's enough information out there for you to keep on top of your applications, that means writing something every single day. I wrote about the planning tools I created here.

2. Get as much help as you can. I was tempted to just plough ahead writing what I wanted without listening to others, especially when their advice was critical, but you need to get as many people as possible to review your whole application and then prepare you for interview. If you can't find any suitable people, consider hiring an admissions consultant.

3. DO NOT underestimate the interview! I've met so many people who were so excited about getting an interview invite that they didn't really prepare for the interview - big mistake! The interview is your final pitch to adcom about why they should admit you and should be treated as such. Be meticulous in your planning, have several different stories about your experience and practice, practice, practice. I'm sorry there are no short cuts here!

You can continue following Top Dog's journey by checking out his blog, TopDogMBA, and Twitter, @topdogmba. Thank you Top Dog for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages
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Related Resources:
• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free guide]
• 4 Reasons You Got Dinged (And What You Can Do About It)
• Take 2—How to Reapply Right to Business School

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2015, 18:12
ImageBy Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group

Time to break out an annual PSA here.  I'm talking all alarms ringing, sirens, whatever it takes to get your attention.  By "you" I mean: anyone applying to business school.  You need to stop doing something immediately.  Here it is:
STOP TRYING TO "DIFFERENTIATE" YOURSELF.  [/b]
Or at least, stop doing it without a professional by your side.  Let's dive into the 4 Rules of Differentiation before someone gets hurt.

Rule #1 - Do not "differentiate yourself" with a panicked career change.  [/b]Throwing a Hail Mary at the last second is not a good idea.  Trying to scramble to a cooler or sexier or "more noble" company is not going to make you stand out as a candidate - it's going to make you look directionless or (worse) fake.  Now, some people change jobs (even right before applying) and that is fine, as long as there is a logical reason for it - ranging from "I hate my current job and may walk into traffic unless I leave it" to "this is a unique opportunity that I have to take."  However, don't change just to change under some faulty logic that they are going to see "Adam Hoff, SpaceX" rather than "Adam Hoff, J.P. Morgan" and start doing backflips.  If there is no logical reason to go work at SpaceX, then don't go work there.  They look at your whole resume - and mainly to see what skills you have, not what brands you racked up - so it's not like changing the "current employer" line is going to change the formula for who you are. This is all risk, no reward.  Would you do anything else in your life that is "all risk, no reward"?  I am guessing not.

Rule #2 - Listing a hard job to get as your short-term goal is not "differentiating."  If you only read one rule, read this one.  Please!  Read it again. Done?  Read it again.  Okay, you get the point.  I have heard many, many times the past two years the idea from candidates that they want to pick post-MBA job X or Y because it will help "differentiate" them.  In basically every case, the job in question is somewhere between "insanely hard" and "impossible" to get after graduating from business school.  I'm talking hedge funds, VC, luxury retail, etc.  I've even heard the quote, "What I really want to do is work in management consulting so I can really see what works and what doesn't and build towards my dream of starting company Z - but I feel like everyone puts management consulting so I want to find something else."  Well, yeah, everyone puts it because management consulting firms hire lots of MBA grads.  And they do that because they need talent and energy to feed an "up or out" machine - and the reason that grads take those jobs is because they can indeed learn what works and what doesn't as they make some good money and build towards the next step.  It's a win for both parties ... so if that is what you want to do and it makes sense, why fight it?  Either way, the worst thing to do is list a job you pretty much can't get, all in some misguided attempt to stand out.  You will stand out all right -for your cratering effect on their employment stats.  Insta-ding.

Rule #3 - The "quick and easy" place to differentiate is in the WHY of your long-term career goal.  I have probably written more about MBA career goals than any subject on earth, so I won't belabor the point now, except to say that you can use your long-term goal to share parts of yourself that are deeply held, introspective, and unique.  That's how you differentiate yourself.  Not "hey, look at how I left Goldman to go work at an oil company for no reason" and not "all these other guys may want to take the slam dunk of management consulting, but I want a c-suite job at Prada!" - no, it's "what I want to do for the rest of my life is X, and the reason is [something that is unique and specific and deeply personal to you.]  That is how you do it.  If you need a mental shifting device, try this: most admissions officers would much rather read a great novel or watch a great TV show than hear a business pitch or dial up a TED Talk.  Don't try to stand out ("differentiate") with your ambition, win them with your humanity.
Rule #4 - The real, pure way to differentiate yourself is to do the app right.  Do you know how many people submit truly great apps?  No joke, my guess from what I've seen is about 1% of the applicant pool.  I'm talking about: 1) a strong baseline profile (3.3 and above, 700 and above, solid impact in the workplace), 2) a really good resume (a sales document that advertises that impact in different contexts), 3) essays that are easy to read, 4) essays that are structured correctly, 5) essays with thesis statements, 6) essays that are introspective (see Rule #3), and 7) essays that nail the DNA of the school in question.  If you check all seven boxes, you just differentiated yourself.  Rather than searching for some magic bullet, just do a really good job.  If you had to read dozens of files each day and only a few were really good, you'd be pumped when you read the handful that were.  I know it's boring and self-serving to lay this out for you, but that doesn't make the advice any less true, so there you have it.

 

If you need help differentiating yourself in a way that does good rather than harm to your app, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or visit us at www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.  You aren't going to hear buzz words or lame gimmicks, just a breakdown of the hard, steady work required for a great app.  
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2016, 09:52
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Is MIT Sloan School of Management on your short list of target schools for this fall’s MBA application season? It’s a phenomenal, highly academic program that draws on the MIT culture at large to offer cutting-edge classes and services, recruit acclaimed faculty, and foster collaborative and educational efforts that involve students, alumni and business partners.

Even among world-class MBA programs, MIT Sloan is in an elite group, with extremely high GMAT scores and GPAs higher than many other top programs. So how can applicants stand out with such a competitive applicant pool?

I recently shared my take with Business Insider readers on the three qualities MIT Sloan looks for in MBA candidates—innovation, global awareness, and analytical abilities—and offer the inside scoop on how you can concretely demonstrate you possess those stellar qualities. Take a look at the original article for my tips.

If you can show that you’d thrive in a program that is international in perspective, highly quantitative, and grounded in innovative approaches, you’ll have a good chance of demonstrating to the admissions team that you’d be an ideal candidate for MIT Sloan’s rigorous — and rewarding — program.

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2016, 10:11
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Just what is Big Data? And how is it used to make real business decisions? Anyone interested in the burgeoning field of business analytics should check out this story in the Wall Street Journal on how the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania is expanding its offerings in this area and will now offer an MBA major in the subject.

The move comes as fewer students head to b-school with a career in finance in mind after graduation. According to the WSJ, 306 students in Wharton’s 2008 MBA class entered the financial-services industry right after graduation; last year, the school reports that number was 219.

While many professionals understand the technical side of business analytics, they don’t know precisely how to frame their business strategy. Companies need people who can also understand the business side and offer data-based solutions.

Wharton Professor Adam Grant tells WSJ that the strengthened focus on analytics will train students in rigorous thinking and decision-making based on large data sets, rather than the isolated scenarios students encounter in a case study.

“We want to create a hub where evidence-based management is the norm rather than the exception,” says Grant.

But Wharton isn’t the only elite business school upping its Big Data game. NYU Stern School of Business and USC Marshall School of Business also offer specialist masters courses in business analytics.

In March, MIT Sloan School of Management announced the launch of a new, specialized Master of Business Analytics program designed to prepare students for careers in business analytics. The inaugural class will enter MIT Sloan in fall 2016.

“The professional opportunities for our graduates will be extensive,” says MIT Sloan Professor Dimitris Bertsimas, the co-director of the MIT Operations Research Center. “Companies from IBM to Dell to Amazon to Google are collectively investing billions of dollars in data collection to build models that help them make better, more informed decisions. This is a transformational moment in business and management science.”

Wharton administrators, meanwhile, have said the school has no plans to create a separate degree program, and aims instead to further integrate analytics content into its full-time MBA program.

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2016, 10:36
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The MIT Sloan School of Management has announced the MBA application deadlines for the 2016-2017 admissions season. The application to the full-time MBA program will not include a traditional essay question this year; instead, the admissions team has come up with a new twist for Sloan aspirants.
Fall 2017 Deadlines
Round 1
Application due: September 15, 2016
Decision released: December 19, 2016

Round 2
Application due: January 17, 2017
Decision released: April 3, 2017

Round 3
Application due: April 10, 2017
Decision released: May 17, 2017
Fall 2017 Essay Alternative
“This year, instead of responding to an essay question,  we are asking applicants to submit a cover letter along with their resume. Your cover letter is an opportunity to introduce yourself, describe your past successes, and explain why MIT Sloan’s MBA Program is the right place for you.”

Your letter should conform to a standard business correspondence and be addressed to Mr. Rod Garcia, Senior Director of Admissions. (250 words or fewer)

Optional Essay:
The Admissions Committee invites you to share additional information about yourself, in any format. If you choose a multimedia format, please host the information on a website and provide us with the URL.

Suggested guidelines:
Please keep all videos and media limited to 2:00 minutes total in length.
Please keep all written essays to 500 words or less.

The MIT Sloan application goes live on July 11, 2016. Please visit the admissions website for further details and directions.
Image credit: Vitor Pamplona (CC BY 2.0)
Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2016, 13:19
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Today we’re discussing a unique MBA option for mid-career professionals – an option to study in a full-time, immersive program with other professionals at the same level.

Joining us today are: Stephen Sacca, Director, MIT Sloan Fellows Program; Silvia McCalliser-Castillo, Director, London Business School EMBA-Global and Sloan Programmes; and Mike Hochleutner, Director, Stanford MSx Program. Welcome!

Why pursue mid-career graduate education in business? [3:00]
Stephen: It’s not easy to hit the pause button in an established career that’s gaining momentum, but it’s really to pause and reflect on what you’ve done and what you’d like to do. I think of it as a reflection year from a personal perspective.

Mike: The world has evolved a lot. People are marrying later, having children later, etc. And they’re going through more career transitions and working longer. The notion that early career training/education will train you for a full career isn’t as accurate as it once was.

Silvia: I absolutely agree. Careers are evolving – people are living longer and working longer. Our program is actually trending older (more years of experience). The opportunity to study with other mature students with a similar amount of experience is really compelling! Students gain exposure to new frames of reference, new industries, new ideas.

Can you give us an overview of your programs? [6:35]
Mike: These three programs have some common heritage. The program at MIT was started with the support of Alfred Sloan, the retired CEO of GM – a forward thinking CEO. The idea was to create a model of education for people who already had some experience, and the potential to run great companies on a global level.

Here at Stanford, our program is in its 60th year. The MSx program is one of only two grad programs in the b-school. We require a minimum of 8 years of work experience.
The MSx program is integrated with the FT MBA: for electives, MSx students have free rein within the GSB and the full university (you can take classes across the campus). We have a global and diverse cohort. We want to help students create a network they’ll draw on for the next 20, 30, 40 years.

Silvia: The LBS Sloan Fellows Programme is a master’s in leadership and strategy. Our students have, on average, 15-18 years’ experience (no less than 10 years), and their average age is 42-44. They take a core curriculum in cohort, all together: some of our areas of emphasis include globalization and strategy in a changing world. LBS has a lot of master’s programs, EMBA programs and partnership programs. Sloan students can take electives with the entire b-school, or with part time students.

Stephen: MIT’s Sloan Fellows Program is in its 87th year. Alfred P. Sloan started the program for people with exceptional potential to lead dynamic organizations. It’s a combination of academics and practice. We emphasize 3 pillars: Academics, leadership, and global perspective. We have 110 students from 35 countries. The minimum is 10 years’ experience, and the average is 14. Our cohort is 70% men and 30% women.

Mike: The minimum experience for Stanford’s MSx program is 8 years. We’re looking for people who have experience in a managerial role: people who have grappled with management challenges.

What is the application process? [13:50]
Silvia: At LBS, we have a unique process for the Sloan Fellows. First, we ask interested candidates to submit a copy of their CV and have a chat with a recruitment coordinator to see whether it’s a good fit. We don’t want to waste anyone’s time. If it’s not right, we may recommend another program at LBS, or waiting a few years to apply, or even applying to a different school. If it’s a good fit, we encourage them to apply. In terms of the application process, it’s an online form (essays, LORs), and they submit their scores from the GMAT or the new Executive Assessment.

[Do the other programs accept the Executive Assessment? MIT: talking about it! Stanford: GMAT or GRE is required.]

Silvia: The process continues with interviews. We’re looking for people who’ve had important responsibility. Our cohort is only about 50-60 people, so it’s important to get the class dynamic right!

Stephen: The process is similar for the Sloan Fellows at MIT. There’s a registration form on the website. We contact people who seem like a good fit and invite them for a campus visit. We also do global visits in the fall. We normally interview about 40% of the applicant pool. If applicants would be a better fit elsewhere, we often counsel them to consider other programs. Our cohort is about 110.

Mike: There are lots of opportunities for people to learn about the MSx program. We do an initial review to see if it’s a good fit, so people can assess before they go through the process. We’re looking for three things: 1. Demonstrated leadership and accomplishment (made an impact) 2. Intellectual vitality (aptitude and attitude) 3. Clarity of purpose. The third point is very important! This is a 1-year program. It’s important to know what you want to do with the program. If you don’t know what your plans are, you might spend the year going too many different directions.

We ask for essays, test scores, LORs. We also consider work experience. And we work hard to assess fit.

What kind of career services support does your program offer? [22:00]
Stephen: We have a shared career services office – within that office, we have people who have experience with executive level career searchers. We’re not seeking career changers, but if they come, we’ll give them what we can offer them. There’s no on-campus recruiting. But we provide coaching on resume development, how to approach the search, etc. And we have tailored help for international students. We expect students to be fully engaged in the program. We had 46% sponsorship this year, and we would like to increase that. If somebody’s looking to pivot, we’re happy to help them, but they have to have a plan.

Mike: The career situation for mid-career folks returning to school is a bit of a quandary. We made a choice: focusing entirely on sponsorship wasn’t in our interest. About 30% of our fellows are sponsored. We have a dedicated team in our career management center that works with our students and sees how they’re different from MBA students. We also work with our employer relations team to make sure they’re aware of our more experienced students. It’s very much a networking-based job search process. It can be a challenging cohort to work with from a career development perspective. But one of the things we can help give people is a set of skills.

Silvia: The LBS Sloan Fellows are a mix of sponsored students, entrepreneurs, and self-sponsored students looking for a change. We don’t have on-campus recruiting. But we work with our contacts to promote our students. And we teach our students to manage their careers. We provide career coaching, mentoring, and advice. Each student is expected to come in with a plan. And the coaching continues after graduation.

What kind of contact do students have with the wider b-school community? [35:45]
Silvia: During electives, our students might work alongside both fellow Sloan fellows with decades of experience and 23-year-old MiM students. We also promote social interaction through clubs and societies.

Stephen: MIT Sloan offers 10 degree programs; 56% of the courses the Sloan Fellows take are electives that are integrated with other students (other courses from the b-school, and the whole MIT campus – as well as Harvard). Our competitions engage the full campus. And every year we have the 1 Sloan Initiative, to bring the school together.

Mike: The GSB has 150 electives for the MBA and MSx programs. And about 15% of the required units can be taken across the full campus, in any division (engineering, education, etc).

How would you coach somebody deciding between the MBA and MSx? [39:20]
Mike: They’re similar in terms of content. What’s different is the individual learning process. (For example, there are smaller sections in the MSx.) Some people want a 2-year program. The core of the MSx is that it’s building on what they’ve already done. If you have over 10 years of experience, that’s what they probably should be doing. We let people make the choice in terms of what’s most appropriate for them. If I think they can get more from another program, I’ll direct them in that way.

MIT has a full menu of programs – who should choose what? [42:50]
Stephen: We’re up-front: we share our portfolio of programs so people can see which program will be most appropriate for them. We’re up-front about our minimum criteria. We don’t encourage people to apply to both the Sloan Fellows and the MBA.

How do you help people determine which LBS program is right for them? [44:30]
Silvia: A lot of Sloans already have an advanced degree. Often, people who choose the Sloan program over an EMBA are people who are looking for a full-time degree.
We encourage people to talk to their employer if they’re hesitating between the EMBA and Sloan Fellows. Sloan is differentiating more and more from other programs. A lot of EMBAs are hoping to accelerate their careers. And we’re finding that Sloans are looking to take a step back, think about their legacy – many are considering entrepreneurship or other pivots (social enterprise, etc).

What do you consider the strengths of your specific programs? [48:00]
Stephen: Sloan is the business brain of MIT, where we have unparalleled strength in science and engineering. We’re also in a densely populated university environment in Boston-Cambridge, which provides a unique environment.

Mike: The strength is Stanford. It’s a unique school and a unique environment at the heart of the innovation economy – it places students in a special ecosystem in Silicon Valley, amid innovative companies in every industry. It’s a global center of innovation.

Silvia: For us, the London experience is critical. London is a world city with a global outlook. We just set a Guinness World Record for a song sung in the most languages here at LBS – and it wasn’t even difficult. This was the first non-US business school to have the top-ranked MBA program.

Can you tell us about a recent grad doing great things? 53:45
Silvia: We had a recent student from Northern Spain who wanted to grow his network in the UK for entrepreneurship. He invested in a classmate’s startup (she’s from Mexico and had been working in the US). It was such a great story of people working together who wouldn’t have met except for the program.

Mike: We had a couple of students, one from a tech background and another from consumer marketing, who were in class, and talking about how social norms can be as motivating as financial incentives when it comes to paying back loans. This led to the idea behind SoFI. A team of 4 students raised $50K in seed money from their classmates, then $70 million after graduation. And now the company is the largest financer of student loans, and it’s moved into mortgages, and is valued at $4 billion. From an insight they had during the program and their work together, this is what they created. It’s not a typical story! But a phenomenal one.

Stephen: A couple of recent grads – one from the US and one from Mexico – had sold their ventures before coming to Sloan. They did a joint thesis, and have now launched a new venture with several of our faculty members on the advisory board. Funding is looking very promising! The program allows people who have mid-career experience to harness their opportunities in ways other people might not see.

The importance of the immersive experience: it gives participants a chance to unplug, but also a chance to get skills (strategy, leadership), along with perspective. [60:50]

Can you share one piece of advice for prospective applicants? [61:55]
Stephen: Be very clear on your objectives and how the program will help. We take the essays very seriously. We want to know why you’re interested in this program, and why now – your real interest and motivation. This year we’re adding a short video.

Silvia: I agree completely! Also: talk to alumni. Sometimes people have forgotten what it’s like to be a student and underestimate how difficult it can be to return to school. Get a sense of what it’s like.

Mike: One of the criteria we look at is clarity of purpose. This is not a program for people who’re trying to decide what they want to be when they grow up. Set priorities. And get clarity in order to explore the program and also get the most out of it.

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Related Links:
MIT Sloan Fellows
Stanford MSx
London Business School Sloan Fellows
EMBA 101

Related Shows:
A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program
Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson
The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
SoFi: Alumni Funded Student Loans
The Scoop on the London Business School MiM Program
How to Become a Corporate Executive
Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice
The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View

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This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 15:06
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In my experience assisting MIT Sloan Fellows applicants for over a decade (Successes every year, and last year all of my MIT Sloan Fellows clients were accepted), I have seen consistently that the adcom values applicants who, among other things, demonstrate consistent outstanding impact and are on track to become leaders in their company and even industry (“high performing” per the MIT SF website). While your application as a whole should convey these points about you, the essays are an ideal opportunity to make the case affirmatively and directly, with example and detail.

Simultaneously, use the essays to convey fit with MIT Sloan’s enduring emphasis on being a proactive, innovative leader and agent of change – as the Sloan Fellows’ website says, “individuals who aren’t satisfied with the status quo and have demonstrated their ability to effect change.”

The essays together should create a vibrant, holistic view of your candidacy:
• The Statement of Objectives, which serves as a lens and sets the context for understanding your candidacy

• Two “story” essays delving into different aspects of your experience – at least one of these should be relatively recent, to strategically show you performing at your highest level organizationally

• A video essay focusing on (for most applicants certainly) a non-work aspect of your life and showing how you engage people personally.

As you select your essay topics and prepare the essays, keep this holistic picture in mind – especially important given the expectation that each MIT Sloan Fellow contribute substantially and distinctively among highly accomplished peers.

ESSAYS

Statement of Objectives: What are your immediate and ultimate professional objectives and, specifically, how will the MIT Sloan Fellows Program help you to achieve them?  What unique contributions will you bring to enrich the experience and diversity of the Sloan Fellows community? (500 words or less, limited to one page)

Let’s break this question into its three parts:

First, your professional objectives. Be specific about position, company/industry, expected scope of responsibilities, and vision for what you want to accomplish. Give more detail for the 1-5 year segment. For the longer term goals, show direction – but not as detailed.

Second, your objectives’ fit with the program. Identify and describe specific aspects of your objectives that align with the values and purposes of the program. Focus on the 2-3 key elements of this fit – fewer, with thoughtful discussion, is far better than a “laundry list” of fit points.

Third, your potential contributions to the community. Again, focus on the 2-3 key aspects. “Unique background” certainly could refer to professional background, and it can also include other relevant, interesting factors and experiences if they represent a potential contribution, such as intimate knowledge of a poorly represented geographic region. This section can be tricky – interesting facts alone don’t show potential contribution; you need to add your insight to make it meaningful; after all, that’s really what you’ll be bringing to the table.

Essay 1:

Think about an instance when you were on a team which did not work well together. What challenges did you face and what did you learn from this experience? (500 words or less, limited to one page)

In selecting a story for this essay, keep the focus on the difficult team dynamics. In addition, be strategic – look for a story that shows an aspect of your work that is particularly interesting and/or impactful and/or represents diversity in some way and/or impressive. (Keep in mind essay 2 to ensure you are portraying different elements.)

Use a story-based structure, which is both efficient and engaging for the reader. First, set the scene briefly – what, where, when, who – and clarify what was at stake for the team. Next, narrate the story, clarifying your specific role in the events. The challenges you faced should be woven into the story. Provide your perspective at key moments: what were you thinking, feeling, saying. Conclude the story with the team’s results.

After the story, add a short paragraph reflecting on what you learned from the experience. I recommend 1-3 points derived specifically from the story. Avoid generic lessons here.  And ideally add a sentence or two noting how you applied one of those lessons subsequently.

Essay 2:
Please describe a time when you made a significant positive impact to an organization that demonstrates your ability to lead. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

When you discuss a “significant positive impact” for a MIT Sloan essay, I suggest finding one that is “bottom line plus.” By that I mean, one you can quantify in some way or for some aspect, but that also extends beyond mere numbers to include change, even in some small way. And this change will likely be related to your demonstrated ability to lead.

Here too (as in essay 1), follow a straightforward story approach to structure the essay –make it a story of your leadership. Use your leadership role as the lens for telling the story. Unlike essay 1, you do not need to include anything about what you learned. I’ve found that it’s almost intuitive for people to add that that the end (“What I learned from this experience is…”) even when it’s not asked. I’ve found pretty consistently that with only 500 words and a compelling story, it’s a much more powerful to just end, if additional reflection isn’t requested. It lets the story reverberate, and it conveys confidence.

Video Essay:

Please choose one of the questions below, and upload a video (90 second maximum) of you responding to the question.
• What are you passionate about?

• Tell us something that we would be surprised to learn about you.

• What do you like to do for fun?

Video can be uploaded on the Multimedia tabVideo: .avi, .flv, .m1v, .m2v, .m4v, .mkv, .mov, .mpeg, .mpg, .mp4, .webm, .wmv

In deciding your topic, respond to the “tone” of the question – it’s kind of begging for something that will make the viewer of the video smile. It doesn’t have to be hilarity – it can be a warm smile or a delighted smile or a charmed smile or a moved smile or a surprised smile.

You can certainly, with an effective presentation, simply discuss your chosen topic on the video. Given the wording of the question, “…of you responding to the question…,” you must be in it and should be the key visual component. But since it’s a visual medium, you could, and I believe should, if the topic warrants, show some aspect of your topic as well (e.g. if you’re discussing your hands-on restoration of an old farmhouse in answer to “tell us something we would be surprised to learn about you,” set the video in the location and walk us through). Keep in mind that it is a visual presentation, not just an essay spoken aloud.

If you aren’t accustomed to doing video presentations, practice and expect to put some effort into visual elements like background and lighting. Keep the background simple, clean, and uncluttered. Have the light behind the camera and shining on you.

Additional Information (a separate question in the application):

Please use this section to include any additional information that you believe is important for the Program to have when evaluating your application that you have not been able to address elsewhere.

If needed, use this space to address a weakness in your profile or qualifications. You can also use it to explain things that are not weaknesses but still need explaining (lack of recommendation from a boss or gap in resume for understandable reason). This question also allows you to discuss a diversity element in your personal background or simply some unique – and relevant -- area of interest.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

MIT Sloan Fellows Deadlines:

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

 
Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free Guide]
• MIT Sloan 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Individual Mobile Test Prep and the MIT Sloan MBA Who Created It [Episode 156]

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2016, 16:08
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Looking for the best possible admissions advice?

How about admissions advice from the admission committee members themselves?

Linda Abraham, founder of Accepted and host of the Admissions Straight Talk podcast has a collection of highly enlightening interviews with directors of admissions and adcom members of top business schools!

Listen in as Linda asks her adcom guests pointed and to-the-point questions about the school, the admissions process, how to get in, and…how to get rejected.

Listen, enjoy, and apply successfully!

Columbia Business School
Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions

Yale School of Management
Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions

USC Marshall
Keith Vaughn, Former Assistant Dean of Admissions

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions and Doreen Amorosa, Associate Dean and Managing Director of Career Management


UCLA Anderson
Jessica Chung, Associate Director of Admissions 

MIT Sloan
Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions

Rotman School of Management
Niki da Silva, Recruitment & Admissions Director

Tuck School of Business
Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions

Univ. of Michigan’s Ross School of Business
Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions, and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise

The Fuqua School of Business
Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions

HEC Paris
Philippe Oster, Director of Communication, Development and Admissions

Johnson at Cornell University
Ann Richards, Associate Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid

For a varied menu of thought-provoking and informative conversations with business leaders, entrepreneurs, MBA students, and more, check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast:

Subscribe:

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This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where to apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
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Re: MIT Sloan MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 12:57
Round 1 applicants, get ready for your interviews! Whether you’ve already received an interview invitation or are hoping to get an invite over the next few weeks, you want to make sure you’re prepared to do your best when the big day arrives.

With that in mind, Jennifer Barba, associate director of admissions at MIT Sloan School of Management, has shared a video with tips and insight regarding MBA interviews at Sloan, which she calls a critical piece of the evaluation process.

Candidates will meet with a professional member of the admissions team, not alumni, and should plan to spend 30-45 minutes discussing both data in their application as well as answering three or four behavioral questions. An example of this type of question is: “Tell me about a situation where you had a difficult interaction with a team member.”

“Interviewing candidates is my favorite part of the evaluation process,” says Barba, and she urges applicants to talk about things that are different than what you shared in the written application. When you ask questions, she adds, make sure they are more thoughtful than what you can find in the FAQs on the website.

Here at SBC, we advise clients to begin their interview prep by learning your application backwards and forwards and crystallize your professional goals and motivations. Then, ask yourself these key questions:
  • Can I clearly articulate my career plan and future goals?
  • What is my motivation to obtain an MBA?
  • How do I plan to use my MBA in my career?
  • What do I really want from my MBA experience?
  • Why is X business school the right place for me?
  • What can I bring to this MBA community?
  • Where do I see myself in 5, 10 or 15 years?

You should be prepared to mention school-specific examples of courses, clubs, and other aspects of the curriculum that fit with your career goals. In short, do your homework and refresh your memory of School X’s program before your interview!

Finally, don’t forget to send your interviewer a thank-you note or email no later than the following day.

Our parting advice: be yourself. You want the admissions committee to admit you for who you really are.
You may also be interested in:
Application Advice from MIT Sloan MBA Students

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***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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MIT Sloan 2017-18 MBA & LGO Application Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 10:00
FROM Sloan Admissions Blog: MIT Sloan 2017-18 MBA & LGO Application Deadlines
Happy Summer! We’re excited to announce our 2017-2018 MBA application deadlines and decision dates:

 
MBA Deadline
MBA Decisions Released

Round One
September 25, 2017
December 19, 2017

Round Two
January 17, 2018
April 3, 2018

Round Three
April 9, 2018
May 14, 2018

Our application will be going live later this summer (think mid to late July) and we’ll be sharing additional tips and information in the months to come. We have made some changes to our application, so please check our website for further details and directions!

For those applying to our dual-degree LGO Program, we are excited to announce two separate application deadlines for this year. For more information on the LGO application process, please visit the LGO website.

 
LGO Deadline
LGO Decisions Released

Round One
September 25, 2017
By December 19, 2017

Round Two
December 4, 2017
March 2, 2018

Our admissions team is hitting the road soon with a busy summer recruiting calendar. We hope to see you at one of our events this summer!

 

 

 

 

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MIT Sloan 2017-18 MBA & LGO Application Deadlines   [#permalink] 19 Jun 2017, 10:00
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