It is currently 21 Oct 2017, 12:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2008
Posts: 195

Kudos [?]: 129 [0], given: 3

Schools: Stanford...Wait, I will come!!!
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2008, 10:01
5
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

52% (00:35) correct 48% (00:42) wrong based on 1000 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 129 [0], given: 3

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jun 2008
Posts: 540

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 92

WE 1: Investment Banking - 6yrs
Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 11:25
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help


This confused me too, darn!

D or E = not sure, but I'll pick D

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 92

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Posts: 103

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 12:47
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities


Totally confused.. please help


I would pick B. "disdain for" is the correct idiom, and "having always professed" correctly modifies "Auden".

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

5 KUDOS received
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1792

Kudos [?]: 1062 [5], given: 5

Location: New York
Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 13:45
5
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game
_________________

Your attitude determines your altitude
Smiling wins more friends than frowning

Kudos [?]: 1062 [5], given: 5

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Posts: 103

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 13:57
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1792

Kudos [?]: 1062 [0], given: 5

Location: New York
Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:25
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
nganle08 wrote:
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"



IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
_________________

Your attitude determines your altitude
Smiling wins more friends than frowning

Kudos [?]: 1062 [0], given: 5

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1792

Kudos [?]: 1062 [0], given: 5

Location: New York
Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:27
nganle08 wrote:
x2suresh wrote:
lgon wrote:
302. For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B)Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D)Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --
Totally confused.. please help


Will go with A.
Here "for all" means 'despite'
Despite his professed disdain of such activites, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Here few more examples:
--for all his talent, used to fall apart in tense moments
--Some have said that, for all his genius, Tendulkar has not contributed as he might at critical phases of a game


what about "disdain" - is "disdain of" the correct idiom? I learned that "disdain for" is the correct one, not "disdain of"



IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
_________________

Your attitude determines your altitude
Smiling wins more friends than frowning

Kudos [?]: 1062 [0], given: 5

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Posts: 103

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:30
Quote:
IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer

Can you explain why B is not the right answer? Thanks

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

1 KUDOS received
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1792

Kudos [?]: 1062 [1], given: 5

Location: New York
Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 14:39
1
This post received
KUDOS
nganle08 wrote:
Quote:
IMO, both are correct idioms.

here is the link from the dictionary which uses "disdain of"


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/disdainful

disdainful
adjective
1. expressing extreme contempt [syn: contemptuous]
2. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer

Can you explain why B is not the right answer? Thanks


Take simple example

(A) for all his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments
Despite his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments

Here it clearly shows the contrast.

You can rewrite the above sentence.
Even though he has talent, Nganle used to fall part in tense moments.


(B)Having always talented person, Nganle used to fall apart in tesne moments.
Here we are not


B changes the original meaning..
Ngalnle is talented person and used to fall apart in tense moments.
No contrast here.

I hope you got it
_________________

Your attitude determines your altitude
Smiling wins more friends than frowning

Kudos [?]: 1062 [1], given: 5

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Posts: 103

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2008, 15:44
[Take simple example

(A) for all his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments
Despite his talent, Nganle used to fall apart in tense moments

Here it clearly shows the contrast.

You can rewrite the above sentence.
Even though he has talent, Nganle used to fall part in tense moments.


(B)Having always talented person, Nganle used to fall apart in tesne moments.
Here we are not


B changes the original meaning..
Ngalnle is talented person and used to fall apart in tense moments.
No contrast here.

I hope you got it[/quote]

Thanks so much. I understand it now.

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

5 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [5], given: 1

Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Nov 2009, 02:41
5
This post received
KUDOS
8
This post was
BOOKMARKED
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities

Kudos [?]: 318 [5], given: 1

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 31 Aug 2009
Posts: 415

Kudos [?]: 349 [1], given: 20

Location: Sydney, Australia
Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Nov 2009, 05:34
1
This post received
KUDOS
jade3 wrote:
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.


Pretty tough one...
I vote for A.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities
professed is parallel to was.
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities
Having always not parallel to 'was'
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
Really awkward structure. The 'and' doesn't need a comma after.
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained
I don't have a good reason except that it doesn't seem to create the comparison.
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities
"professions of disdaining" is wordy and passive.

Kudos [?]: 349 [1], given: 20

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [0], given: 1

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2009, 03:15
The OA is A

Kudos [?]: 318 [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 28 Jul 2009
Posts: 150

Kudos [?]: 247 [0], given: 4

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2009, 03:29
Can somebody elaborate how to reach A here?

Kudos [?]: 247 [0], given: 4

3 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [3], given: 1

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2009, 03:55
3
This post received
KUDOS
bsv180985 wrote:
Can somebody elaborate how to reach A here?


"For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip"

The first part of the sentence contrast the second part.
Out of all the choices, only Choice A-because the sentence starts with “For” and Choice E-because the sentence starts with “In spite of” can contrast the second part. Hence Choice B,C and D are out.

“professions” means “learned occupation”, whereas “professed” means “allegiance”.

"Professed" is right in this context. Hence A is the correct Answer

Kudos [?]: 318 [3], given: 1

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 28 Jul 2009
Posts: 150

Kudos [?]: 247 [1], given: 4

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2009, 04:45
1
This post received
KUDOS
jade3 wrote:
bsv180985 wrote:
Can somebody elaborate how to reach A here?


"For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip"

The first part of the sentence contrast the second part.
Out of all the choices, only Choice A-because the sentence starts with “For” and Choice E-because the sentence starts with “In spite of” can contrast the second part. Hence Choice B,C and D are out.

“professions” means “learned occupation”, whereas “professed” means “allegiance”.

"Professed" is right in this context. Hence A is the correct Answer


Make sense. thanks.
I agree it implies a contrast. And such phrases as "In spite of, Despite, Although, Even though" serve it.
But, I was not sure that "FOR" entails a contrast.

Kudos [?]: 247 [1], given: 4

2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [2], given: 1

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2009, 07:41
2
This post received
KUDOS
bsv180985 wrote:
jade3 wrote:
bsv180985 wrote:
Can somebody elaborate how to reach A here?


"For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip"

The first part of the sentence contrast the second part.
Out of all the choices, only Choice A-because the sentence starts with “For” and Choice E-because the sentence starts with “In spite of” can contrast the second part. Hence Choice B,C and D are out.

“professions” means “learned occupation”, whereas “professed” means “allegiance”.

"Professed" is right in this context. Hence A is the correct Answer[/quote

Make sense. thanks.
I agree it implies a contrast. And such phrases as "In spite of, Despite, Although, Even though" serve it.
But, I was not sure that "FOR" entails a contrast.



There are lot of definitions of “For”
Some of the most important definitions from GMAT point of view are
-Because of
-in place of
-in favor of
-in spite of
-with respect to

Kudos [?]: 318 [2], given: 1

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 1

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Re: professed disdain of [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jan 2010, 14:29
OA is A

the source is 1000 SC

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 487

Kudos [?]: 162 [0], given: 149

WE 1: 4 years Tech
Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2010, 06:07
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities
Of is a prepositioin and it should link two nouns,Disdaining has to be placed as a gerund.
It should be "disdaining of all such activities"
Here disdaining has been improperly used.
_________________

My Post Invites Discussions not answers
Try to give back something to the Forum.I want your explanations, right now !
Please let me know your opinion about the Chandigarh Gmat Centrehttp://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-experience-at-chandigarh-india-centre-111830.html

Kudos [?]: 162 [0], given: 149

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2010
Posts: 3

Kudos [?]: 1 [1], given: 0

Re: Aude [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2010, 09:55
1
This post received
KUDOS
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities --- The first part is a modifier. The modified subject is correctly placed after the modifier. So it is correct
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities --"having always professed" is awkward in this sentance
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and --- "and" is incorrect
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained --- "were" is incorrect
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities --- "professions of disdaining" is awkward


So my answer is: A

Kudos [?]: 1 [1], given: 0

Re: Aude   [#permalink] 04 Nov 2010, 09:55

Go to page    1   2   3    Next  [ 50 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.