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For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed

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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2017, 22:18
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 00:37
nanishora wrote:
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal over a century before the contemporary American environmental movement was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. arguing here is incorrect - what does it modify? essay cannot argue. Neither does it modify the whole clause properly

launched itself with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers. movement launched itself??? incorrect

launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. Seems like the best choice - which argued works better. Although I agree launched vs. was launched is questionable But nonetheless launched works here.

launched Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; Emerson outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. same problem as A. Modifier error

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; in it he outlined his beliefs in this essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers. it is ambiguous - what is it? movement, essay ?



I have a small doubt in the correct option C what does it refers to .If it refers to nature's beauty ,how can a pronoun refer to a possessive noun Nature's beauty .Experts please clarify.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 08:25
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sruwan wrote:
c) launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

in the correct answer, how can it refer back to nature? can it refer to something in quotes? I thought GMAT does not allow a pronoun to refer to a possessive. Please clarify. Thanks


"it" refers to "nature's beauty". The noun is "beauty".

Does "it" refer to the closest noun always?
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 21:19
rekhabishop wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
sruwan wrote:
c) launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

in the correct answer, how can it refer back to nature? can it refer to something in quotes? I thought GMAT does not allow a pronoun to refer to a possessive. Please clarify. Thanks


"it" refers to "nature's beauty". The noun is "beauty".

Does "it" refer to the closest noun always?


Not necessary. A pronoun takes the logical antecedent. Here is a post discussing pronoun ambiguity:
https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2016/0 ... -the-gmat/
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 09:49
I feel like the OA should be (A) because it feels more natural to say "the movement was launched" than to say, as in choice (C), "the movement launched." Any response from the experts on this point?
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 09:13
The it in E refers to the movement (The one after the semi-colon), So the second IT would also refer to the movement right ? As per MGMAT every pronoun irrespective whenever called in the sentence will refer to the same antecedent. Can someone explain why is E incorrect ?
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 14:48
A,B and E are wrong.
C and D, i though "which" is wrong, lesson here absolute phrase modifies the whole preceding clause.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 03:23
Can anyone explain why 'launched' is preferred here over 'was launched'?
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2017, 03:47
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
stoy4o wrote:
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal over a century before the contemporary American environmental movement was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

launched itself with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers.

launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

launched Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; Emerson outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; in it he outlined his beliefs in this essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


1. Please, explain your reasoning.
2. Is it proper to say "a movement was launched" in the absence of a subject/noun/person or still use "a movement launched"?

Source:Veritas quiz bank


Responding to a pm:

The thing that puts me off (A) is the use of 'and' to join two sentences which are different thoughts (though related). C improves it a whole lot with the use of the semi colon. It separates the sentences.

As for your question, 'which' does refer to the book. It's acceptable to say that the book/article/paper argues ..., (e.g. the idea could be that the particular written material presents an idea against an accepted notion)


Apart from and, is there any other problem in option a? Also, arguing seems fine to me here as the sentence says that he wrote an article " Nature", arguing...
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2017, 06:03
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal over a century before the contemporary American environmental movement was launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Error identification:
a) For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was??????.movement was launched.
Observation: To maintain parallelism was???.was, we should use ???was launched??? and not just ???launched???


b) Arguing that man does not fully accept: It is the person who can argue and not a book.
Arguing that man??? and all that it has to offer.: It modifies the previous clause and denotes the How aspect. Usage is correct.
c) Using pronoun he in he outlined his beliefs: Correct as it is pointed out to its antecedent Ralph and can???t refer back to noun American movement.
POE :
a) Option A seems OK.
b) launched itself with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring, and outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? which argued that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it offers.
Launched itself incorrect.
Incorrect.
c) launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? which argued that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Relative pronoun which refers to Nature and it is incorrect, as book can???t argue.
d) Launched Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; Emerson outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Rejected just because was launched seemed to maintain parallelism as in option A.
e) was launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; in it he outlined his beliefs in this essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it offers.
???In it he outlined??? usage of pronoun ???it??? seems incorrect.

Settled by A, Experts kindly help me understand my flaw.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2017, 07:38
SAHILJPR wrote:
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal over a century before the contemporary American environmental movement was launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Error identification:
a) For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was??????.movement was launched.
Observation: To maintain parallelism was???.was, we should use ???was launched??? and not just ???launched???


b) Arguing that man does not fully accept: It is the person who can argue and not a book.
Arguing that man??? and all that it has to offer.: It modifies the previous clause and denotes the How aspect. Usage is correct.
c) Using pronoun he in he outlined his beliefs: Correct as it is pointed out to its antecedent Ralph and can???t refer back to noun American movement.
POE :
a) Option A seems OK.
b) launched itself with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring, and outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? which argued that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it offers.
Launched itself incorrect.
Incorrect.
c) launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? which argued that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Relative pronoun which refers to Nature and it is incorrect, as book can???t argue.
d) Launched Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; Emerson outlined his beliefs in his essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it has to offer.
Rejected just because was launched seemed to maintain parallelism as in option A.
e) was launched with Rachel Carson???s Silent Spring; in it he outlined his beliefs in this essay, ???Nature,??? arguing that man does not fully accept nature???s beauty and all that it offers.
???In it he outlined??? usage of pronoun ???it??? seems incorrect.

Settled by A, Experts kindly help me understand my flaw.


I can see a problem in the non-underlined part:

For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal... "his" is definitely wrong. The correct structure would be either,
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was professed ideal....
or,
Transcendentalism was Ralph Waldo Emerson's professed ideal...

Also see this post explaining why option A is wrong:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/for-ralph-wa ... l#p1148289

However I am not sure whether the reason for eliminating A is quite clear or acceptable in the OE. You would possibly find a more solid reason to eliminate an answer choice.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 18:08
Practicegmat wrote:
Jp27 wrote:
nanishora wrote:
For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed ideal over a century before the contemporary American environmental movement was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer.

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. arguing here is incorrect - what does it modify? essay cannot argue. Neither does it modify the whole clause properly

launched itself with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers. movement launched itself??? incorrect

launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; he outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” which argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. Seems like the best choice - which argued works better. Although I agree launched vs. was launched is questionable But nonetheless launched works here.

launched Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; Emerson outlined his beliefs in his essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer. same problem as A. Modifier error

was launched with Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring; in it he outlined his beliefs in this essay, “Nature,” arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it offers. it is ambiguous - what is it? movement, essay ?


the which in C seems to refer to "Nature" a essay, so my question is how can a essay argue anything, a person can make an argument through an essay.
In option A "arguing ..... " is used as an adverbial modifier modifying the preceding clause.
For example ->
I wrote on book on genetic, arguing that human cloning is possible.


But I still don't understand 2 things :

1. "The contemporary American environmental movement was launched"
vs
"The contemporary American environmental movement launched"

An environmental movement cannot launch itself right? The movement always needs to be launched by others ...

Hence to me "The contemporary American environmental movement was launched..." is correct
and "The contemporary American environmental movement launched ..." is incorrect


2. To me "arguing that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty and all that it has to offer" is correctly modifying the previous clause. What is wrong with arguing here

Please correct me where I am wrong here


I too have the same doubt as above.
Can anyone please explain how one is correct and the other wrong between the below two?:-
1. "The contemporary American environmental movement was launched"
vs
2."The contemporary American environmental movement launched"
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2018, 08:21
mikemcgarry GMATNinjaTwo

Hi, I was wondering could one of you guys please explain the difference between option C and D? I chose option D and I see why it is incorrect because D seems to be saying that the movement launched the book, when it should be the other way around. My main confusion with option C is with the usage of "which". It seems to be saying that "the essay argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty". Can an essay really argue? I thought it was the author who argues through his beliefs/opinions and not the essay. Is this wrong? Could one of you guys please help me clarify this doubt? Would greatly appreciate it!
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2018, 15:18
csaluja wrote:
mikemcgarry GMATNinjaTwo

Hi, I was wondering could one of you guys please explain the difference between option C and D? I chose option D and I see why it is incorrect because D seems to be saying that the movement launched the book, when it should be the other way around. My main confusion with option C is with the usage of "which". It seems to be saying that "the essay argued that man does not fully accept nature’s beauty". Can an essay really argue? I thought it was the author who argues through his beliefs/opinions and not the essay. Is this wrong? Could one of you guys please help me clarify this doubt? Would greatly appreciate it!

Dear csaluja,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

You are correct that (D) makes it seem that the environmental movement launched the book Silent Spring, which is the complete opposite of what happened: that critical and seminal classic was the flashpoint that began the modern environmental movement. That's one big problem with (D).

As for your question: you can't be narrowly literalist in interpreting language, because you will miss the living quality of language. In a hyper-literalist sense, yes, only people can argue, and a written work merely contains the argument put forth by a person, so the written work itself can't "argue." That is literally and logically true, and absolutely not how language is used. Real language is used by real people, and it is sometimes illogical, but that doesn't change that fact that it is used this way. Since the written work of an individual long dead, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), is now the only way we will encounter the arguments of Emerson, it's natural to say that his writing, his essay, argues something. This is a perfectly valid use of language. Is it technically illogical? Yes, but that doesn't matter in the least.

My friend, if you take a purely mathematical, logical approach to language, you will miss the living quality of language, and the GMAT SC is all about recognizing this living quality, the way language in the real world is used to communicate real things. It would help you immensely to develop a habit of reading:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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GMATNinja please explain why A is wrong. I am not satisfied with the above explanation that "and" should not be used to connect these two clauses. I can't find any problems with A. Thank you very much.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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trangtran2402 wrote:
GMATNinja please explain why A is wrong. I am not satisfied with the above explanation that "and" should not be used to connect these two clauses. I can't find any problems with A. Thank you very much.

Dear trangtran2402,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

I say that, while (C) is better, (A) is too close--there's not really enough wrong with it to be a definitively clear wrong answer. Both "launched" and "was launched" are valid uses of that verb: perhaps the former is slightly more direct and powerful because it's active. Similarly, linking the two long clauses with an "and" makes the whole sentence a little clunky: the semicolon divide in (C) is better. Having said all of this, (A) is not really "wrong" in the way that an incorrect choice would be wrong on the official GMAT SC.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2018, 19:23
Quote:
Dear trangtran2402,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

I say that, while (C) is better, (A) is too close--there's not really enough wrong with it to be a definitively clear wrong answer. Both "launched" and "was launched" are valid uses of that verb: perhaps the former is slightly more direct and powerful because it's active. Similarly, linking the two long clauses with an "and" makes the whole sentence a little clunky: the semicolon divide in (C) is better. Having said all of this, (A) is not really "wrong" in the way that an incorrect choice would be wrong on the official GMAT SC.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)


mikemcgarry
Thank you so much for your detailed explanation! Do these types of answers happen in real tests? If yes, how often? To tell the truth your explanation left me more confused, since if I encounter these answers I have to rely on my sense to decide which is better, and as you said they are too close, it means depending on luck then.
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 18:28
trangtran2402 wrote:
mikemcgarry
Thank you so much for your detailed explanation! Do these types of answers happen in real tests? If yes, how often? To tell the truth your explanation left me more confused, since if I encounter these answers I have to rely on my sense to decide which is better, and as you said they are too close, it means depending on luck then.


Hi trangtran2402!

I'm happy to jump in for Mike :-) You should not see a question like this on the real test. As Mike said, there isn't really any that's definitively wrong about (A). That should not ever happen on the real exam -- the incorrect answers should always have a clear reason why they are incorrect. So you don't have to worry about making really subtle decisions like this one.

To develop this sense in general, though, I'd recommend reading as much as possible, as described in this post: How to Improve Your Verbal Score

I hope that's helpful! :-)
-Carolyn
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Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 23:41
I don't think (C) is correct

"Nature", which argued

so the essay no longer argues?

Someone help a brother out. I picked (A)
Re: For Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcendentalism was his professed   [#permalink] 12 Feb 2018, 23:41

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