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For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic

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For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2015, 02:50
1
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

55% (00:58) correct 45% (01:04) wrong based on 203 sessions

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For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic weight gain, but it is unhealthy to such a large degree that damage can be caused to the heart.

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
B. it is so unhealthy that
C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
E. doing so is so unhealthy that

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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2015, 03:10
E seems best: doing so is so unhealthy that

reasoning: faults in bold
A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
B. it is so unhealthy that
C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
E. doing so is so unhealthy that ---->correct
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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2015, 06:06
(E) as well

A and B = It doesn't have a clear antecedent

C - wordy and awkward

D - wordy and awkward

E - doing so = eating fatty foods ; So _____ that ______ is the correct idiomatic usage


Hence IMHO (E)
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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2015, 17:02
1
reto wrote:
For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic weight gain, but it is unhealthy to such a large degree that damage can be caused to the heart.

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
B. it is so unhealthy that
C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
E. doing so is so unhealthy that

Dear reto,
I'm happy to respond. :-) I will tell you: I don't like this SC at all. It falls short of the standards of the GMAT in a few ways.

First of all, in the non-underlined first independent clause, the way the adverb "actually" interrupts the verb is colloquial and gauche. In fact, the use of the word "actually" in this context is technically illogical: the use of "actually" as an intensifier is also colloquial and does not bear precise examination. In a few ways, this sentence does not reflect the well-spoken language of the GMAT.

I also think the passage construction at the end is extremely awkward. Apparently, the author felt compelled to compromise the end of the sentence because of what he was trying to test in the underlined portion. This demonstrates a certain ineptitude in GMAT SC composition--- one never sees this on the GMAT.

Also, the logic of the question hinges on technicalities in a way that sentences on the GMAT SC do not. It is perfectly acceptable to use the pronoun "it" to refer to a gerund. We can't use a pronoun to refer to a verb, but a gerund is a noun-like form, so it can serve as the antecedent of a noun. Now, a sophist might argue that the pronoun "it" is ambiguous, because it could also refer to "weight gain," but the parallelism between the two clauses guarantees pairing the pronoun with the correct antecedent. Remember that parallelism is not purely a grammatical structure: it is first and foremost a logical structure, and it can have logical implications for other relationship in the sentence, including pronoun-antecedent affiliation. Thus, (B) is perfectly acceptable, as is (A) --- (A) is a little wordy but very sophisticated. Choice (E) is also perfectly fine, but it is not the only correct answer.

I would give this question a grade of an F as a GMAT SC practice question.

This question demonstrate a mechanical understanding of the rules, not a deep integrated comprehension of the underlying logic of what the GMAT tests. Here's a much higher quality question:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3276

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2015, 03:30
reto wrote:
For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic weight gain, but it is unhealthy to such a large degree that damage can be caused to the heart.

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
B. it is so unhealthy that
C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
E. doing so is so unhealthy that


Thanks mikemcgarry for your contribution to this post. :) I agree that the question does not feel very official GMAT like (after going through a lot of OG questions, which come along very differently). I did not know that "it" can refer to a gerund... very nice, thanks!

For completeness sake I have the official explanation attached:

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
"This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. In addition, this answer choice is stylistically flawed. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice." It is true that GMAC would never use the expression "to such a large degree"? mikemcgarry

B. it is so unhealthy that
"This answer choice is grammatically incorrect and repeats the original Pronoun mistake. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so."

C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
"Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it repeats the stylistic flaw. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice."

D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
"Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it changes the sentence's meaning. In this answer choice, the phrase large degrees describes the level of damage to the heart. The phrase to such a large degree in the original sentence is used to describe how unhealthy the eating of fatty foods is."

E. doing so is so unhealthy that
"The original sentence is grammatically and stylistically flawed. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. Additionally, the phrase to such a large degree is redundant."
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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2015, 10:55
reto wrote:
Thanks mikemcgarry for your contribution to this post. :) I agree that the question does not feel very official GMAT like (after going through a lot of OG questions, which come along very differently). I did not know that "it" can refer to a gerund... very nice, thanks!

For completeness sake I have the official explanation attached:

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. In addition, this answer choice is stylistically flawed. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice. It is true that GMAC would never use the expression "to such a large degree"? mikemcgarry

B. it is so unhealthy that
This answer choice is grammatically incorrect and repeats the original Pronoun mistake. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so.

C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it repeats the stylistic flaw. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice.

D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it changes the sentence's meaning. In this answer choice, the phrase large degrees describes the level of damage to the heart. The phrase to such a large degree in the original sentence is used to describe how unhealthy the eating of fatty foods is.

E. doing so is so unhealthy that
The original sentence is grammatically and stylistically flawed. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. Additionally, the phrase to such a large degree is redundant.

Dear reto,
I'm happy to respond. :-) My friend, at least in the OE for (A), you typed your own words immediately after the OE. You have made it very difficult for anyone to determine where the OE words end and your words begin. You also seem to have omitted the quotes or formatting that the original text used to set off the words they were quoting from the question. All this makes your post very confusing. Here on GMAT Club, I often use color as well as quotes to set off something I am quoting from my own words. If you want a high degree of clarity in your own mind, it's very useful practice to strive to communicate with the utmost clarity.

The expression "to such a large degree" is a bit formal, but then again, the GMAT is a bit formal. It is bit longer than other ways to say the same thing, but in a way, that gives it a kind of rhetorical emphasis. I could imagine a GMAT SC having this phrase as part of the OA. The OE here wants to demonize this expression, and that is unjustified. In fact, I would say that their OA...
. . . doing so is so unhealthy that ...
...is 100% grammatically correct but a bit awkward because of the rapid repetition of the word "so." I think a far more well=-spoken version would be something such as . . .
. . . doing so is unhealthy to such a large degree that . . .
. . . doing so is unhealthy to such an extent that . . .

I would expect something more along these lines on the GMAT.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2015, 11:31
mikemcgarry wrote:
reto wrote:
Thanks mikemcgarry for your contribution to this post. :) I agree that the question does not feel very official GMAT like (after going through a lot of OG questions, which come along very differently). I did not know that "it" can refer to a gerund... very nice, thanks!

For completeness sake I have the official explanation attached:

A. it is unhealthy to such a large degree that
This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. In addition, this answer choice is stylistically flawed. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice. It is true that GMAC would never use the expression "to such a large degree"? mikemcgarry

B. it is so unhealthy that
This answer choice is grammatically incorrect and repeats the original Pronoun mistake. A pronoun (in this case, it) refers to a previously mentioned noun. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so.

C. doing so unhealthy to such a large degree that
Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it repeats the stylistic flaw. The phrase to such a large degree is wordy and redundant. Try to look for a more concise answer choice.

D. doing so is so unhealthy that large degrees of
Although this answer choice corrects the original grammatical Pronoun error by using doing so instead of the pronoun it to describe the verb eating, it changes the sentence's meaning. In this answer choice, the phrase large degrees describes the level of damage to the heart. The phrase to such a large degree in the original sentence is used to describe how unhealthy the eating of fatty foods is.

E. doing so is so unhealthy that
The original sentence is grammatically and stylistically flawed. If we wish to refer to a previously mentioned verb, we need to use the phrase to do so or doing so. Additionally, the phrase to such a large degree is redundant.

Dear reto,
I'm happy to respond. :-) My friend, at least in the OE for (A), you typed your own words immediately after the OE. You have made it very difficult for anyone to determine where the OE words end and your words begin. You also seem to have omitted the quotes or formatting that the original text used to set off the words they were quoting from the question. All this makes your post very confusing. Here on GMAT Club, I often use color as well as quotes to set off something I am quoting from my own words. If you want a high degree of clarity in your own mind, it's very useful practice to strive to communicate with the utmost clarity.

The expression "to such a large degree" is a bit formal, but then again, the GMAT is a bit formal. It is bit longer than other ways to say the same thing, but in a way, that gives it a kind of rhetorical emphasis. I could imagine a GMAT SC having this phrase as part of the OA. The OE here wants to demonize this expression, and that is unjustified. In fact, I would say that their OA...
. . . doing so is so unhealthy that ...
...is 100% grammatically correct but a bit awkward because of the rapid repetition of the word "so." I think a far more well=-spoken version would be something such as . . .
. . . doing so is unhealthy to such a large degree that . . .
. . . doing so is unhealthy to such an extent that . . .

I would expect something more along these lines on the GMAT.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Dear mikemcgarry
Thank you very much for your lines. I changed the format of my last post and it should be very clear now I hope. Thank you again. :-)
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Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2017, 20:22
i narrowed down to B and E and finally picked B.

'It' in option B refers to 'Eating fatty foods '.

although OA is E, Option B looks more concise than option E.

Thanks Mike for elaborate explanation.
Re: For some people, eating fatty foods may not actually result in drastic   [#permalink] 01 Apr 2017, 20:22
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