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Franklin's Super-Fly Critical Reasoning Question Thread

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New post 29 Sep 2009, 09:01
Spoilt wrote:
B for me.

POE : B is the only clear choice.


Is this for the classical pianist question? If so, B is not the answer.
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New post 29 Sep 2009, 13:27
Franklin wrote:
The Law School Admission Council created this question back in 2003-4 ... I thought the question to be quite prophetic!

Quote:
The economy is doing badly. First, the real estate slump has been with us for some time. Second, car sales are at their lowest in years. Of course, had either one or the other phenomenon failed to occur, this would be consistent with the economy as a whole being healthy. But, their occurrence together makes it quite probable that my conclusion is correct.

Which one of the following inferences is most strongly supported by the information above?

A) If car sales are at their lowest in years, then it is likely that the economy is doing badly.

B) If the economy is doing badly, then either the real estate market or the car sales market is not healthy.

C) If the real estate market is healthy, then it is likely that the economy as a whole is healthy.

D) If the economy is in a healthy state, then it is unlikely that the real estate and car sales markets are both in a slump.

E) The bad condition of the economy implies that both the real estate and the car sales markets are doing badly.


D and E are close. Usually answer choices, which restate premises of the argument are wrong in inference questions. E kind of does that.

So D for me.
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New post 29 Sep 2009, 14:35
I would go with option E for the classical pianist question.
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New post 01 Oct 2009, 05:48
even i would go with the choice E for the classical pianist question.

whats the OA.
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New post 01 Oct 2009, 09:59
C is highly likely a classical.
Most classicals recognize CS.
Claudette, like most c's, recognize CS.
"Vast Majority" (NOT ALL) who are not classicals do not recognize CS. [But some who are not classicals may recognize CS.]
"Many" (NOT ALL) who are not classicals have not heard of CS.

With out reading answer choices, I thoght about two points:
1. It does not consider some who are not classicals may recognize CS and
2. some who are classicals but do not recognize CS

A, B, C are out of scope and D is not a correct answer.

E, IMO, the best choice.
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New post 01 Oct 2009, 10:41
Franklin wrote:
The Law School Admission Council created this question back in 2003-4 ... I thought the question to be quite prophetic!

Quote:
The economy is doing badly. First, the real estate slump has been with us for some time. Second, car sales are at their lowest in years. Of course, had either one or the other phenomenon failed to occur, this would be consistent with the economy as a whole being healthy. But, their occurrence together makes it quite probable that my conclusion is correct.

Which one of the following inferences is most strongly supported by the information above?

A) If car sales are at their lowest in years, then it is likely that the economy is doing badly.

B) If the economy is doing badly, then either the real estate market or the car sales market is not healthy.

C) If the real estate market is healthy, then it is likely that the economy as a whole is healthy.

D) If the economy is in a healthy state, then it is unlikely that the real estate and car sales markets are both in a slump.

E) The bad condition of the economy implies that both the real estate and the car sales markets are doing badly.


It is a straight forward if..then condition

if(not(car sales bad) or not(real estate slump))
then
economy is good

or
if((car sales bad ) and (real estate slump))
then
economy bad

From this analysis, the only option supported is C
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New post 01 Oct 2009, 10:43
Franklin wrote:
One more for today ...

Quote:
It is highly likely that Claudette is a classical pianist. Like most classical pianists, Claudette recognizes many of Clara Schumann's works. The vast majority of people who are not classical pianists do not. In fact, many people who are not classical pianists have not even heard of Clara Schumann.

The reasoning in the argument above is flawed in that it

A) ignores the possibility that Claudette is more familiar with the works of other composers of music for piano.

B) presumes, without providing justification, that people who have not heard of Clara Schumann do not recognize her works.

C) presumes, without providing justification, that classical pianists cannot also play other musical instruments.

D) relies for its plausibility on the vagueness of the term "classical."

E) ignores the possibility that the majority of people who recognize many of Clara Schumann's works are not classical pianists.


The answer is clearly E.
B and C can be clearly eliminated
A doesnt matter or is outta scope
D similarly is out of scope
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New post Updated on: 03 Oct 2009, 15:40
Sorry guys for my sporadic posting. I was in NYC for a conference.

Quote:
Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula portrayed vampires - the "undead" who roam at night to such the blood out of living people - as able to turn into bats. As a result of the pervasive influence of this novel, many people now assume that a vampire's being able to turn into a bat is an essential part of vampire myths. However, this assumption is false, for vampire myths existed in Europe long before Stoker's book.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

A) At least one of the European vampire myths that predated Stoker's book did not portray vampires as strictly nocturnal.

B) Vampire myths in Central and South America, where real vampire bats are found, portray vampires as able to turn into bats.

C) Vampire myths did not exist outside Europe before the publication of Stoker's Dracula.

D) At least one of the European vampire myths that predated Stoker's book did not portray vampires as able to turn into bats.

E) At the time he wrote Dracula, Stoker was familiar with earlier European vampire myths.


Answer:

Originally posted by Franklin on 03 Oct 2009, 15:22.
Last edited by Franklin on 03 Oct 2009, 15:40, edited 2 times in total.
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New post 03 Oct 2009, 15:32
Quote:
Scientist: My research indicates that children who engage in impulsive behavior similar to adult thrill-seeking behavior are twice as likely as other children to have a gene variant that increases sensitivity to dopamine. From this, I conclude that there is a causal relationship between this gene variant and an inclination toward thrill-seeking behavior.

Which one of the following, if true, most calls into question the scientist's argument?

A) Many impulsive adults are not unusually sensitive to dopamine.

B) It is not possible to reliably distinguish impulsive behavior from other behavior.

C) Children are often described by adults as engaging in thrill-seeking behvaior simply because they act impulsively.

D) Many people exhibit behavioral tendencies as adults that they did not exhibit as children.

E) The gene variant studied by the scientist is correlated with other types of behavior in addition to thrill-seeking behavior.


Answer:
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New post 03 Oct 2009, 15:36
1
Franklin wrote:
Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula portrayed vampires - the "undead" who roam at night to such the blood out of living people - as able to turn into bats. As a result of the pervasive influence of this novel, many people now assume that a vampire's being able to turn into a bat is an essential part of vampire myths. However, this assumption is false, for vampire myths existed in Europe long before Stoker's book.


Franklin, the question is missing.
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New post 03 Oct 2009, 15:42
powerka wrote:
Franklin wrote:
Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula portrayed vampires - the "undead" who roam at night to such the blood out of living people - as able to turn into bats. As a result of the pervasive influence of this novel, many people now assume that a vampire's being able to turn into a bat is an essential part of vampire myths. However, this assumption is false, for vampire myths existed in Europe long before Stoker's book.


Franklin, the question is missing.


HAHA! Thanks ... fixed! Just adding a layer of difficulty!!!
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New post Updated on: 03 Oct 2009, 16:02
3
Franklin wrote:
Quote:
Scientist: My research indicates that children who engage in impulsive behavior similar to adult thrill-seeking behavior are twice as likely as other children to have a gene variant that increases sensitivity to dopamine. From this, I conclude that there is a causal relationship between this gene variant and an inclination toward thrill-seeking behavior.

Which one of the following, if true, most calls into question the scientist's argument?

A) Many impulsive adults are not unusually sensitive to dopamine.

B) It is not possible to reliably distinguish impulsive behavior from other behavior.

C) Children are often described by adults as engaging in thrill-seeking behvaior simply because they act impulsively.

D) Many people exhibit behavioral tendencies as adults that they did not exhibit as children.

E) The gene variant studied by the scientist is correlated with other types of behavior in addition to thrill-seeking behavior.



C and E -> are irrelevant.
A and D -> Imprecise quantifiers (many) are dangerours in GMAT. Many could still be less than 1% of the adult population.
B -> if it is not possible to distinguish impulsive behavior from other behavior, then the scientist's research has no value, and nothing can be concluded based on it.

Great question.
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Originally posted by powerka on 03 Oct 2009, 15:50.
Last edited by powerka on 03 Oct 2009, 16:02, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 03 Oct 2009, 16:01
Franklin wrote:
Sorry guys for my sporadic posting. I was in NYC for a conference.

Quote:
Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula portrayed vampires - the "undead" who roam at night to such the blood out of living people - as able to turn into bats. As a result of the pervasive influence of this novel, many people now assume that a vampire's being able to turn into a bat is an essential part of vampire myths. However, this assumption is false, for vampire myths existed in Europe long before Stoker's book.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

A) At least one of the European vampire myths that predated Stoker's book did not portray vampires as strictly nocturnal.

B) Vampire myths in Central and South America, where real vampire bats are found, portray vampires as able to turn into bats.

C) Vampire myths did not exist outside Europe before the publication of Stoker's Dracula.

D) At least one of the European vampire myths that predated Stoker's book did not portray vampires as able to turn into bats.

E) At the time he wrote Dracula, Stoker was familiar with earlier European vampire myths.


Answer:


The author concludes that people should not assume that "vampires turning into bats is essential" because "vampire myths existed in Europe long before Stoker's book".

The answer must contain "vampires turning into bats" and "Europe".

D is the only answer that does so.
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New post 13 Nov 2009, 02:31
powerka wrote:
Franklin wrote:
Quote:
Scientist: My research indicates that children who engage in impulsive behavior similar to adult thrill-seeking behavior are twice as likely as other children to have a gene variant that increases sensitivity to dopamine. From this, I conclude that there is a causal relationship between this gene variant and an inclination toward thrill-seeking behavior.

Which one of the following, if true, most calls into question the scientist's argument?

A) Many impulsive adults are not unusually sensitive to dopamine.

B) It is not possible to reliably distinguish impulsive behavior from other behavior.

C) Children are often described by adults as engaging in thrill-seeking behvaior simply because they act impulsively.

D) Many people exhibit behavioral tendencies as adults that they did not exhibit as children.

E) The gene variant studied by the scientist is correlated with other types of behavior in addition to thrill-seeking behavior.



C and E -> are irrelevant.
A and D -> Imprecise quantifiers (many) are dangerours in GMAT. Many could still be less than 1% of the adult population.
B -> if it is not possible to distinguish impulsive behavior from other behavior, then the scientist's research has no value, and nothing can be concluded based on it.

Great question.



Agree with you, powerka, that this is a very good question.
I understand that the best answer is B because it makes scientist's study useless.
But how do you think, what is the reason to negate E?
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New post 25 Nov 2009, 22:12
First of all, many thanks to Franklin..Man hats off to you.. what a beautiful post !! This should be made sticky. I couldn't resist - finished all the questions in one sitting. Please post some more questions. I wish I would get some more such questions to practice as I have my Test next week. Thanks everyone for posting their responses and many thanks to Franklin once again.Please post some more (as soon as possible : out of selfishness I am getting impatient)
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Re: Franklin's Super-Fly Critical Reasoning Question Thread  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2009, 00:06
2
Franklin wrote:
The Law School Admission Council created this question back in 2003-4 ... I thought the question to be quite prophetic!

Quote:
The economy is doing badly. First, the real estate slump has been with us for some time. Second, car sales are at their lowest in years. Of course, had either one or the other phenomenon failed to occur, this would be consistent with the economy as a whole being healthy. But, their occurrence together makes it quite probable that my conclusion is correct.

Which one of the following inferences is most strongly supported by the information above?

A) If car sales are at their lowest in years, then it is likely that the economy is doing badly.

B) If the economy is doing badly, then either the real estate market or the car sales market is not healthy.

C) If the real estate market is healthy, then it is likely that the economy as a whole is healthy.

D) If the economy is in a healthy state, then it is unlikely that the real estate and car sales markets are both in a slump.

E) The bad condition of the economy implies that both the real estate and the car sales markets are doing badly.


This one is a difficult one, but if anyone cares, here is the write up I did on it...
This is definitely one of those questions that requires a lot of time...and not worth it on the LSAT test day...

PROMPT: Which one of the following inferences is most strongly supported by the information above? So this is a "Soft Must Be True" Question.

Lets start with a KEY to make it easier:
RES: "Real Estate Slump for Some Time"
CLY: "Car Sales Lowest in Years"
EDB: "Economy Doing Badly"
~ (the sign for tilde): "NOT"
v (small letter v): "OR"
& (ampersand): "AND"
--> (Arrow): "THEN"
-M-> : "MOST"

***Note: People have two problems here:

FIRST PROBLEM:

Sentence 4: "Of course, had either one or the other phenomenon failed to occur, this would be consistent with the economy as a whole being healthy." One of the challenges here is understanding what "consistent with" means in logical reasoning. This requires an understanding of higher level logic (the concept of entailment in particular), but I will try to simplify...Many, incorrectly diagram this as: ~RES v ~CLY --> ~EDB (With a contraposition [CP] of this is: EDB --> RES & CLY)

However, If it says that "A is consistent with B"...It means that "A is entailed by B"...or more simply "B entails A".
Thus...B is the antecedent (sufficient) and A is the consequent (required) . Take a look, for example, a statement/quote by FDR. "I have decided that the course of conduct which I am following is consistent with my sense of responsibility as president in time of war". More simply, it states, my action (let's refer to as action X) is consistent with my responsibility (let's refer to as responsibility y). The question you have to ask is what "requires" what. It is his responsibility that requires the action, not the other way around. Thus, the correct diagram will be "If I have a sense of responsibility as a president in time of war, then I will take this course of conduct."

SO...going back to question...you have to diagram the above as a healthy economy requires RES or CLY
Which is (And remember EDB is Economy Doing Badly, so ~EDB is a healthy economy).
~EDB --> ~RES v ~CLY (with contraposition [CP] RES & CLY --> EDB)

SECOND PROBLEM:

Sentence 5: "But, their occurrence together makes it quite probable that my conclusion is correct."
***His conclusion, that he refers to in this sentence, is EDB. But what most people miss is that the last sentence is diagrammable. The word, "probable" should be a sign of a logical force (most...or 50%+1).
Diagram is: RES & CLY -M-> EDB (There is no contraposition [CP] of MOST statements).

So if we put this down it looks like this:

P1: ~EDB --> ~RES v ~CLY (CP: RES & CLY --> EDB)
P2: RES & CLY -M-> EDB
P3: We have RES
P4: We have CLY
-----
CONCLUSION: EDB

Note: While you can sometimes combine most and all statements, you don't get anything useful from the above, so we hit the answer choices.

A) If car sales are at their lowest in years, then it is likely that the economy is doing badly.
***NOTE: Likely has a logical force of MOST (50%+1)
Diagram: CLY -M-> EDB
***EXPLANATION: We have no evidence to support that CLY alone will "likely" cause EDB. It could...but it is not "MUST BE TRUE"
SO...WRONG...

B) If the economy is doing badly, then either the real estate market or the car sales market is not healthy.
***Diagram: EDB --> RES v CLY
***EXPLANATION: Fallacy of the converse of P1. It could be true, but it is not a "MUST BE TRUE"
SO...WRONG...

C) If the real estate market is healthy, then it is likely that the economy as a whole is healthy.
***Diagram: ~RES -M-> ~EDB
***EXPLANATION: This is the fallacy of the inverse in P2. It could be true, but it is not a "MUST BE TRUE".
SO...WRONG...

D) Lets come back to this at the end...

E) The bad condition of the economy implies that both the real estate and the car sales markets are doing badly.
***Diagram: EDB --> RES & CLY
***EXPLANATION: Again, fallacy of the converse for CP of P1. EBD does not require RES & CLY, so not a "MUST BE TRUE".
SO...WRONG...

Ok...Back to D)
If the economy is in a healthy state, then it is unlikely that the real estate and car sales markets are both in a slump.

Lets diagram one at a time:
If the economy is in a healthy state: ~EDB
Then it is UNLIKELY that you have both RES & CLY:

Unlikely is a quantifier meaning NOT LIKELY. This does not mean some...it just means NOT MOST...or "MOST ARE NOT"
So...
You diagram it as:
~EDB -M-> ~(RES & CLY)
Which is the logical equivalent of...
~EDB -M-> ~RES v ~CLY

And, if you look at P1, you see...
~EDB --> ~RES v ~CLY

And b/c we understand that if All A are B, then Most A are B

You can conclude, that Given P1...It MUST BE TRUE that...
~EDB -M-> ~RES v ~CLY
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New post 04 Jan 2010, 17:57
I guess the answer is A, because money exists because we believe in it.
If we stop believing in it, it will disappear, that means it is not real.
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New post 17 Jan 2010, 09:44
Quote:
It is proposed to allow the sale, without prescription, of a medication that physicians currently prescribe to treat the common ear inflammation called "swimmer's ear." The principal objection is that most people lack the expertise for proper self-diagnosis and might not seek medical help for more serious conditions in the mistaken belief that they have swimmer's ear. Yet in a recent study, of 1,000 people who suspected that they had swimmer's ear, 84 percent had made a correct diagnosis - a slightly better accuracy rate than physicians have in diagnosing swimmer's ear. Thus, clearly, most people can diagnose swimmer's ear in themselves without ever having to consult a physician.

Which one of the following, if true, most undermines the conclusion?

A) Case in which swimmer's ear progresses to more serious infections are very rare.

B) Most of those who suspected incorrectly that they had swimmer's ear also believed that they had other ailments that in fact they did not have.

C) Most of the people who diagnosed themselves correctly had been treated by a physician for a prior occurrence of swimmer's ear.

D) Physicians who specialize in ear diseases are generally able to provide more accurate diagnoses than those provided by general practitioners.

E) For many people who develop swimmer's ear, the condition disappears without medical or pharmaceutical intervention.


IMO... C... 1min 30 seconds....
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New post 17 Jan 2010, 09:46
Quote:
In an experiment, researchers played a series of musical intervals - two-note sequences - to a large diverse group of six-month old babies. They found that the babies paid significantly more attention when the intervals were perfect octaves, fifths, or fourths than otherwise. These intervals are prevalent in the musical systems of most cultures around the world. Thus, humans probably have a biological predisposition to pay more attention to those intervals than to others.

Which one of the following, if true most strengthens the argument?

A) Several similar experiments using older children and adults found that these subjects, too, had a general tendency to pay more attention to octaves, fifths, and fourths than to other musical intervals.

B) None of the babies in the experiment had previous exposure to music from any culture.

C) All of the babies in the experiment had been exposed to music drawn equally from a wide variety of cultures around the world.

D) In a second experiment, these same babies showed no clear tendency to notice primary colors more than other colors.

E) Octaves, fifths, and fourths were played more frequently during the experiment than other musical intervals were.


IMO B... 1 min 7 sec
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Re: Franklin's Super-Fly Critical Reasoning Question Thread  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2010, 13:34
Franklin wrote:
Okay, so I got a PM stating that the questions I've posted so far are too easy. I guess I need to rectify that! :-D

It's bonus Wednesday ... I will post three questions since I will not be able to provide a question tomorrow (attending a seminar).

I thought about adding my reasoning to the discussion but I think that would be superfluous especially since snipertrader did such a fantastic job!

Quote:
In an experiment, researchers played a series of musical intervals - two-note sequences - to a large diverse group of six-month old babies. They found that the babies paid significantly more attention when the intervals were perfect octaves, fifths, or fourths than otherwise. These intervals are prevalent in the musical systems of most cultures around the world. Thus, humans probably have a biological predisposition to pay more attention to those intervals than to others.

Which one of the following, if true most strengthens the argument?

A) Several similar experiments using older children and adults found that these subjects, too, had a general tendency to pay more attention to octaves, fifths, and fourths than to other musical intervals.

B) None of the babies in the experiment had previous exposure to music from any culture.

C) All of the babies in the experiment had been exposed to music drawn equally from a wide variety of cultures around the world.

D) In a second experiment, these same babies showed no clear tendency to notice primary colors more than other colors.

E) Octaves, fifths, and fourths were played more frequently during the experiment than other musical intervals were.


IMO B.. 1:43
I narrowed down to B and D but final answer B.
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