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The next set of PS questions. I'll post OA's with detailed explanations after some discussion. Please, post your solutions along with the answers.

1. The length of the diagonal of square S, as well as the lengths of the diagonals of rhombus R are integers. The ratio of the lengths of the diagonals is 15:11:9, respectively. Which of the following could be the difference between the area of square S and the area of rhombus R?

I. 63
II. 126
III. 252


A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and III only
E. I, II and III

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-80.html#p1215318


2. Set S contains 7 different letters. How many subsets of set S, including an empty set, contain at most 3 letters?

A. 29
B. 56
C. 57
D. 63
E. 64

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215323

3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215329


4. The functions f and g are defined for all the positive integers n by the following rule: f(n) is the number of positive perfect squares less than n and g(n) is the number of primes numbers less than n. If f(x) + g(x) = 16, then x is in the range:

A. 30 < x < 36
B. 30 < x < 37
C. 31 < x < 37
D. 31 < x < 38
E. 32 < x < 38

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215335


5. Which of the following is a factor of 18!+1?

A. 15
B. 17
C. 19
D. 33
E. 39

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215338


6. If the least common multiple of a positive integer x, 4^3 and 6^5 is 6^6. Then x can take how many values?

A. 1
B. 6
C. 7
D. 30
E. 36

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215345


7. The greatest common divisor of two positive integers is 25. If the sum of the integers is 350, then how many such pairs are possible?

A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. 5

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215349


8. The product of a positive integer x and 377,910 is divisible by 3,300, then the least value of x is:

A. 10
B. 11
C. 55
D. 110
E. 330

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215359


9. What is the 101st digit after the decimal point in the decimal representation of 1/3 + 1/9 + 1/27 + 1/37?

A. 0
B. 1
C. 5
D. 7
E. 8

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215367


10. If x is not equal to 0 and x^y=1, then which of the following must be true?

I. x=1
II. x=1 and y=0
III. x=1 or y=0


A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and III only
E. None

Solution: fresh-meat-151046-100.html#p1215370


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New post 03 Sep 2013, 02:26
rrsnathan wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
10. If x is not equal to 0 and x^y=1, then which of the following must be true?

I. x=1
II. x=1 and y=0
III. x=1 or y=0


A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and III only
E. None

Notice that if x=-1 and y is any even number, then \((-1)^{even}=1\), thus none of the options must be true.

Answer: E.



Hi Bunuel,

As per the question which of the following must be true.

So as per the given choice B) II only is true right
where 1^0 = 1 as X =1 and Y=0 given.

As ur explanation gives another chance as
X coud be = -1 , and Y = any even.

Please clarify where i am wrong.

Thanks in Advance,
Rrsnathan


x=1 and y=0 indeed satisfies x^y=1, but the question asks "which of the following must be true". So, this option is NOT necessarily true, because x can be -1 and y any even number.
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New post 18 Sep 2013, 02:57
Bunuel wrote:
25*1=25 and 25*13=325;
25*3=75 and 25*11=275;
25*5=125 and 25*9=225.

Answer: C.


Hello, what about 175, 175 ? The question doesn't state they are distinct positive numbers.

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New post 18 Sep 2013, 03:34
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muzammil wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
25*1=25 and 25*13=325;
25*3=75 and 25*11=275;
25*5=125 and 25*9=225.

Answer: C.


Hello, what about 175, 175 ? The question doesn't state they are distinct positive numbers.


The point is that if the two integers are 175 and 175, then their greatest common divisor going to be 175, not 25 as given in the stem.

Does this make sense?
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New post 30 Sep 2013, 04:14
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


I would like to request some some help with this question..

Could you please elaborate on the theory behind 2^n?
Isnt the null set considered to be a subset of this set?
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New post 30 Sep 2013, 05:41
Transcendentalist wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


I would like to request some some help with this question..

Could you please elaborate on the theory behind 2^n?
Isnt the null set considered to be a subset of this set?


Consider simpler set: {a, b, c}. How many subsets does it have? Each of a, b, and c has two choices either to be included in subsets or not. Thus total of 2^38 subsets (including an empty set). The subsets are:

{a, b, c} --> each is included;
{a, b} --> a and b are included;
{a, c};
{b, c};
{a};
{b};
{c};
{} empty set, none is included.

2^3=8 subsets.

Harder question to practice about the same concept: how-many-subordinates-does-marcia-have-57169.html#p692676

Hope it helps.
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New post 11 Oct 2013, 11:01
Hi bunuel ,
Is following approach right ?
As hcf is actually difference or multiple of difference of two numbers..
So a- b = 25k,
a+b=350

Also k can be only an even number less than 12, that is a- b can at most be only 300, for an odd k anyway integer condition won't satisfy when we solve two equations,
So a-b can be only 50, 100, 150, 200,250,300 ,
This give us three pairs of a and b




quote="Bunuel"]7. The greatest common divisor of two positive integers is 25. If the sum of the integers is 350, then how many such pairs are possible?

A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. 5

We are told that the greatest common factor of two integers is 25. So, these integers are \(25x\) and \(25y\), for some positive integers \(x\) and \(y\). Notice that \(x\) and \(y\) must not share any common factor but 1, because if they do, then GCF of \(25x\) and \(25y\) will be more that 25.

Next, we know that \(25x+25y=350\) --> \(x+y=14\) --> since \(x\) and \(y\) don't share any common factor but 1 then (x, y) can be only (1, 13), (3, 11) or (5, 9) (all other pairs (2, 12), (4, 10), (6, 8) and (7, 7) do share common factor greater than 1).

So, there are only three pairs of such numbers possible:
25*1=25 and 25*13=325;
25*3=75 and 25*11=275;
25*5=125 and 25*9=225.

Answer: C.[/quote]

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New post 12 Jan 2014, 22:15
Bunuel wrote:
9. What is the 101st digit after the decimal point in the decimal representation of 1/3 + 1/9 + 1/27 + 1/37?

A. 0
B. 1
C. 5
D. 7
E. 8

\(\frac{1}{3} + \frac{1}{9} + \frac{1}{27} + \frac{1}{37}=\frac{333}{999} + \frac{111}{999} + \frac{37}{999} + \frac{27}{999}=\frac{508}{999}=0.508508...\).

102nd digit will be 8, thus 101st digit will be 0.

Answer: A.


Great questions Bunuel!

Is there a trick to convert 1/37 --> 27/999?
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New post 13 Jan 2014, 00:17
m3equals333 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
9. What is the 101st digit after the decimal point in the decimal representation of 1/3 + 1/9 + 1/27 + 1/37?

A. 0
B. 1
C. 5
D. 7
E. 8

\(\frac{1}{3} + \frac{1}{9} + \frac{1}{27} + \frac{1}{37}=\frac{333}{999} + \frac{111}{999} + \frac{37}{999} + \frac{27}{999}=\frac{508}{999}=0.508508...\).

102nd digit will be 8, thus 101st digit will be 0.

Answer: A.


Great questions Bunuel!

Is there a trick to convert 1/37 --> 27/999?


\(\frac{1}{3} =\frac{1*333}{3*333}=\frac{27}{999}\).

\(\frac{1}{9} =\frac{1*111}{9*111}=\frac{27}{999}\).

\(\frac{1}{27} =\frac{1*37}{27*37}=\frac{27}{999}\).

\(\frac{1}{37} =\frac{1*27}{37*27}=\frac{27}{999}\).

Following link might help for this problem: math-number-theory-88376.html (check Converting Fractions chapter).
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New post 27 Feb 2014, 07:22
Bunuel wrote:
10. If x is not equal to 0 and x^y=1, then which of the following must be true?

I. x=1
II. x=1 and y=0
III. x=1 or y=0


A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and III only
E. None

Notice that if x=-1 and y is any even number, then \((-1)^{even}=1\), thus none of the options must be true.

Answer: E.


Bunuel.. (II) x=1 andy=0 will give ans 1.. cant we say that this is the solution dat must give Ans "1"? 1^0=1?
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New post 27 Feb 2014, 07:35
sanjoo wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
10. If x is not equal to 0 and x^y=1, then which of the following must be true?

I. x=1
II. x=1 and y=0
III. x=1 or y=0


A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and III only
E. None

Notice that if x=-1 and y is any even number, then \((-1)^{even}=1\), thus none of the options must be true.

Answer: E.


Bunuel.. (II) x=1 andy=0 will give ans 1.. cant we say that this is the solution dat must give Ans "1"? 1^0=1?


The question asks which of the following MUST be true, not COULD be true. So, if if x=-1 and y is any even number, then \((-1)^{even}=1\), thus none of the options MUST be true.
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New post 17 Mar 2014, 11:48
Bunuel wrote:
9. What is the 101st digit after the decimal point in the decimal representation of 1/3 + 1/9 + 1/27 + 1/37?

A. 0
B. 1
C. 5
D. 7
E. 8

\(\frac{1}{3} + \frac{1}{9} + \frac{1}{27} + \frac{1}{37}=\frac{333}{999} + \frac{111}{999} + \frac{37}{999} + \frac{27}{999}=\frac{508}{999}=0.508508...\).

102nd digit will be 8, thus 101st digit will be 0.

Answer: A.


How will one come to know that 508/999 is a repeating decimal. One would stop at 508/999..

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Bunuel wrote:
4. The functions f and g are defined for all the positive integers n by the following rule: f(n) is the number of perfect squares less than n and g(n) is the number of primes numbers less than n. If f(x) + g(x) = 16, then x is in the range:

A. 30 < x < 36
B. 30 < x < 37
C. 31 < x < 37
D. 31 < x < 38
E. 32 < x < 38

Perfect squares: 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, ..,
Prime numbers: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, ...

If x = 31, then f(31) = 5 and g(31) = 10: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 10 = 15.
If x = 32, then f(32) = 5 and g(32) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 11 = 16.
...
If x = 36, then f(36) = 5 and g(36) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 11 = 16.
If x = 37, then f(37) = 6 and g(37) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 6 + 11 = 17.

Thus x could be 32, 33, 34, 35 or 36: 31<x<37.

Answer: C.


Why is zero not being considered in the count of perfect squares? I realize that it states that n is positive, but if f(n) is defined as perfect squares less than n and zero is less than, why do we not count it?
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New post 03 Apr 2014, 08:44
MrWallSt wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
4. The functions f and g are defined for all the positive integers n by the following rule: f(n) is the number of perfect squares less than n and g(n) is the number of primes numbers less than n. If f(x) + g(x) = 16, then x is in the range:

A. 30 < x < 36
B. 30 < x < 37
C. 31 < x < 37
D. 31 < x < 38
E. 32 < x < 38

Perfect squares: 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, ..,
Prime numbers: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, ...

If x = 31, then f(31) = 5 and g(31) = 10: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 10 = 15.
If x = 32, then f(32) = 5 and g(32) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 11 = 16.
...
If x = 36, then f(36) = 5 and g(36) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 5 + 11 = 16.
If x = 37, then f(37) = 6 and g(37) = 11: f(x) + g(x) = 6 + 11 = 17.

Thus x could be 32, 33, 34, 35 or 36: 31<x<37.

Answer: C.


Why is zero not being considered in the count of perfect squares? I realize that it states that n is positive, but if f(n) is defined as perfect squares less than n and zero is less than, why do we not count it?


You are right. The question should read: f(n) is the number of positive perfect squares less than n. Edited.
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New post 09 Apr 2014, 01:53
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


Hi Bunuel,

Is {NULL} a subset of {1,2,3,4,5}?
Because 2^5 also contains {NULL} as one possibility.

Thanks..

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riskietech wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


Hi Bunuel,

Is {NULL} a subset of {1,2,3,4,5}?
Because 2^5 also contains {NULL} as one possibility.

Thanks..


Yes, an empty set is a subset of all sets.
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New post 17 May 2014, 07:44
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


Dear Bunnel

I didnt understand this.

y didnt we take the set {1,2,3,4,5} into consideration and solve like the above qs? where did we get 2^5 from?
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New post 17 May 2014, 07:51
NGGMAT wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


Dear Bunnel

I didnt understand this.

y didnt we take the set {1,2,3,4,5} into consideration and solve like the above qs? where did we get 2^5 from?


What do you mean by the red part?

As for 2^5: the number of subsets of n-element set is 2^n, thus the number of subsets of 5-element set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} is 2^5 (note that this includes an empty set as well as the original set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}). Now, all subsets of {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} are the subsets of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and does not include 0.

Does this make sense?
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New post 17 May 2014, 08:20
Bunuel wrote:
NGGMAT wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.


Dear Bunnel

I didnt understand this.

y didnt we take the set {1,2,3,4,5} into consideration and solve like the above qs? where did we get 2^5 from?


What do you mean by the red part?

As for 2^5: the number of subsets of n-element set is 2^n, thus the number of subsets of 5-element set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} is 2^5 (note that this includes an empty set as well as the original set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}). Now, all subsets of {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} are the subsets of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and does not include 0.

Does this make sense?


By red part i meant that y we havent solved it like we did the below qs:

2. Set S contains 7 different letters. How many subsets of set S, including an empty set, contain at most 3 letters?

A. 29
B. 56
C. 57
D. 63
E. 64

1 empty set;
C^1_7=7 sets with one element;
C^2_7=21 sets with two elements;
C^3_7=35 sets with three element.

Total 1+7+21+35=64 sets


y did 2^n come into qs 3 and not qs 2?
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New post 17 May 2014, 08:39
NGGMAT wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
NGGMAT wrote:
Dear Bunnel

I didnt understand this.

y didnt we take the set {1,2,3,4,5} into consideration and solve like the above qs? where did we get 2^5 from?


What do you mean by the red part?

As for 2^5: the number of subsets of n-element set is 2^n, thus the number of subsets of 5-element set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} is 2^5 (note that this includes an empty set as well as the original set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}). Now, all subsets of {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} are the subsets of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and does not include 0.

Does this make sense?


By red part i meant that y we havent solved it like we did the below qs:

2. Set S contains 7 different letters. How many subsets of set S, including an empty set, contain at most 3 letters?

A. 29
B. 56
C. 57
D. 63
E. 64

1 empty set;
C^1_7=7 sets with one element;
C^2_7=21 sets with two elements;
C^3_7=35 sets with three element.

Total 1+7+21+35=64 sets


y did 2^n come into qs 3 and not qs 2?


We could use 2^n for the second question too:

{The number of subsets with 0, 1, 2, or 3 terms} = {The total # of subsets} - {Subsets with 4, 5, 6, or 7 elements} = \(2^7 - (C^4_7+C^5_7+C^6_7+C^7_7)=128-(35+21+7+1)=64\).

But as you can see this approach is longer than the one used in my solution for that question.
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New post 25 May 2014, 11:41
Hi Bunuel,

1. I went about the combinatorial approach and got 31 and saw your response below that states that one subset is the null set (empty set)

2. Now I also came across M16-23 in the GMAT club tests that states that "If the mean of the set S does not exceed mean of any subset of set S, which of the following must be true about set S?" And the right answer to that question is "all elements in set S are equal" and "the median of set S equals the mean of set S".

Aren't 1 and 2 contradictory? The only way in question M16-23 set S can have a mean more than mean of every subset including null set is if set S is null itself?

I am sure I am overthinking this and just need my caffeine.

Thanks,
Meera



Bunuel wrote:
jacg20 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
3. How many different subsets of the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} do not contain 0?

A. 16
B. 27
C. 31
D. 32
E. 64

Consider the set without 0: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. Each out of 5 elements of the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} has TWO options: either to be included in the subset or not, so total number of subsets of this set is 2^5=32. Now, each such set will be a subset of {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and won't include 0.

Answer: D.



Hi Bunuel,

I did this exercise as follows:

I eliminate the 0, so i have the following set: (1,2,3,4,5). Now, i use combinatorics.

Set containing 5 elements: 5C5=1
Set containing 4 elements: 4C5=5
Set containing 3 elements: 3C5=10
Set containing 2 elements: 2C5=10
Set containing 1 elements: 1C5=5

So, the total of posibilites are 31. What am I missing here¿??

Thanks in advance


You are missing 1 empty set, which is a subset of the original set and also does not contain 0.

Hope it's clear.

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Re: Fresh Meat!!!   [#permalink] 25 May 2014, 11:41

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