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Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas,

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2010, 23:41
Hey Nusma,

We don't disagree. You just hit on ANOTHER reason why D is problematic. But my reasons are both legitimate, and in the end, more grammatically central than the parallelism issue, because we do sometimes parallel a singular and a plural: "I have three cookies and a glass of orange juice." OR "They are terrible musicians and a lousy comedy team."

Hope that makes sense!

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2010, 00:04
Hi tommy
Ohh ! I didn't see the modifier issue. :-D. instability, significant contributors to global warming. Thanks for pointing that out.
But I have seen gmat keeps the "noun number" same when listing the items. And especially maintains "the" any of the item starts with the determiner "the". The following SC has the same issue - A is wrong.

Rockets, like the airplane and the jet, were
rapidly improved during World War II.
(A) Rockets, like the airplane and the jet,
were
(B) The rocket, like airplanes and jets, was
(C) Rockets, like airplanes and jets, was
(D) The rocket, like the airplane and the jet,
were
(E) The rocket, like the airplane and the jet,
was

OA is E. Source Kaplan.
OE : That is, we can't compare the plural
“rockets”with the singular the “airplane and the jet,”
in (A); nor can we compare the singular “the rocket”
with the plural “airplanes and jets,” in (B).

cheers

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2010, 01:22
Hey Nusma,

Honestly, I'm not 100% on the rule of this. In your example, we're comparing things to the subject, which has a plural verb. In that case, we need to match plural, because the verb is, in some ways, applying to both the original subject and the comparison terms. In the example we've been discussing, the items in question are the objects of the sentence, so there's no verb confusion. Anyway, there are plenty of reasons to cross off D. Stupid D. : )

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2010, 04:54
nusmavrik wrote:
Hi tommy
Ohh ! I didn't see the modifier issue. :-D. instability, significant contributors to global warming. Thanks for pointing that out.
But I have seen gmat keeps the "noun number" same when listing the items. And especially maintains "the" any of the item starts with the determiner "the". The following SC has the same issue - A is wrong.

Rockets, like the airplane and the jet, were
rapidly improved during World War II.
(A) Rockets, like the airplane and the jet,
were
(B) The rocket, like airplanes and jets, was
(C) Rockets, like airplanes and jets, was
(D) The rocket, like the airplane and the jet,
were
(E) The rocket, like the airplane and the jet,
was

OA is E. Source Kaplan.
OE : That is, we can't compare the plural
“rockets”with the singular the “airplane and the jet,”
in (A); nor can we compare the singular “the rocket”
with the plural “airplanes and jets,” in (B).

cheers


And if it were:

Rockets, like airplanes and jets, were...

What would Kaplan say?
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Last edited by noboru on 30 Jul 2010, 12:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2010, 12:05
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Hey Noburu,

That would definitely be wrong; most things between commas are not considered part of the main sentence/subject (the exception being in a list of three things, where the middle item WOULD be part of the main subject, assuming the list was the subject of the sentence: "Bread, cheese, and water were hard to come by during the war."

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2010, 12:17
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Noburu,

That would definitely be wrong; most things between commas are not considered part of the main sentence/subject (the exception being in a list of three things, where the middle item WOULD be part of the main subject, assuming the list was the subject of the sentence: "Bread, cheese, and water were hard to come by during the war."

-t


Sorry, I wanted to say Rocket, like airplanes and jets, were...

Aside from that, I personally prefer not to use the determinant "the" when doing this kind of comparisons. "The" seems to be referring to a very specific rocket, airplane or jet, and generally what we want is to compare in general terms.
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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2012, 05:13
Y it can't be A ?
My reason for why I eliminated A, B and C is huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability

It means as if reservoirs of energy are causing sea floor instability which is not the meaning that the original sentence intends to present. So A,B and C are ruled out for possibly. It must be possible which is D and E. Now you can consider the parallelism issue in D and E and easily rule out D.

djhouse81 wrote:
I chose "A."

I see your decision to go with "E," based on parellism, but first that parallelism has to be idiomatic: "...being studied for their potential as...". When you put it back in the sentence, "potential as" does not sound as good as "potential to be." Instead, "A" correctly uses the idiom, "...being studied for their potential to be...". It also has correct parallelism, "...to be [blank]...and [blank]". If you take out the modifier, "possibly...instability," it makes more sense. The modifier is there to throw you off.

Despite the above reasons, it cannot be "B" because adding "even" in there is unnecessary. Just plug the answer choice back in the stem to make sure it flows.

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2012, 05:48
how to eliminate to be and as .....

A and C is my shortlisted answer .. I chose C because I thought "as" is a better usage then "to be" ...

B,D and E --> do not convey the true meaning of the sentence ....

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2012, 08:08
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Very interesting.

Point 1. Let me give a different dimension of //ism. How many things are the Gas Hydrates have the potential to be or pote4ntial as? Only two and not three as D and E point out: 1. Potential to be huge gas reservoirs and 2. Significant contributors. The intervening participial phrase ‘possibly causing sea instability’ is an adverbial modifier that modifies the previous clause in its entirety. It is therefore not essential to see what it modifies. So in my opinon, D and E are droppable in as much as they point out to three things as the GHs have the potential for while the text means only two factors.
Pont 2. Between to be and as. ‘Potential to be’ IMO, is kind of speculation. Something has the potential to be, but it is not exploited as of now. For all that the potential may even turn negative. On the contrary, ‘potential as’ is something that is confirmed. But the original note borders more on speculation considering them to potentials to be; and one of these factors is even a possible cause for some instability. That is the reason we have to drop C, D and E. In A and B. apparently, the intervening modifier looks inelegantly placed, but still is passable. In B, the addition of ‘even as’ is unnecessary and changes the meaning of the original text. So B is gone. A looks the best bet IMO.

My kudo to the original poster of this thread.
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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2012, 08:28
daagh wrote:
Very interesting.

Point 1. Let me give a different dimension of //ism. How many things are the Gas Hydrates have the potential to be or pote4ntial as? Only two and not three as D and E point out: 1. Potential to be huge gas reservoirs and 2. Significant contributors. The intervening participial phrase ‘possibly causing sea instability’ is an adverbial modifier that modifies the previous clause in its entirety. It is therefore not essential to see what it modifies. So in my opinon, D and E are droppable in as much as they point out to three things as the GHs have the potential for while the text means only two factors.
Pont 2. Between to be and as. ‘Potential to be’ IMO, is kind of speculation. Something has the potential to be, but it is not exploited as of now. For all that the potential may even turn negative. On the contrary, ‘potential as’ is something that is confirmed. But the original note borders more on speculation considering them to potentials to be; and one of these factors is even a possible cause for some instability. That is the reason we have to drop C, D and E. In A and B. apparently, the intervening modifier looks inelegantly placed, but still is passable. In B, the addition of ‘even as’ is unnecessary and changes the meaning of the original text. So B is gone. A looks the best bet IMO.

My kudo to the original poster of this thread.



Nicely explained.. Now i know how to differentiate A from C...

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2012, 03:13
What is the OA. I am still confused between potential to be and potential as.

@daagh: Here I think potential to be is the right usage.
Ex- Sachin has the potential to be the captain
Sachin's potential as captain is questionable
So usage of example 1 is more suitable here.
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New post 11 Sep 2012, 03:25
What is the OA. I am still confused between potential to be and potential as.

@daagh: Here I think potential to be is the right usage.
Ex- Sachin has the potential to be the captain
Sachin's potential as captain is questionable
So usage of example 1 is more suitable here.
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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2012, 05:14
Hi Daagh,

Thanks a lot for providing the detailed explanation.

However, I am still confused on how to identify the intended meaning in the original question, as both "Potential to" (in option A) and "Potential as" (in option E) are idiomatically correct............... To maintain parallelism, (E) seems to be correct.......... However, going by your logic, where "Potential to" seems to have a speculative intention, (A) seems to be correct.

I googled this question, and found other forums where this question has been discussed. While some experts select (E), others select (A).

In the following link, expert Eli from Kaplan (who is also active in Gmatclub) suggests that (E) is correct because only (E) maintains parallelism
http://www.beatthegmat.com/gas-hydrates-t18920.html

Similarly, in the following post, an expert from Manhattan also suggests that (E) is correct
http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/gas ... 16086.html

However, experts in the following post vacillate between (A) and (E), with the final post of an expert leaning towards (A)
http://www.urch.com/forums/gmat-sentenc ... tes-2.html

The point here is not how experts interpret this question, but how GMAC will interpret such a question - Will GMAC lean towards making the sentence parallel, i.e term (E) as correct, or will lean towards (A)?

Please let me know your views on this, because if such a question is presented in the GMAT, most of us will select (E) because it is difficult to guess whats the intended meaning - i.e. whether the sentence should have a adverbial modifier (possibly causing sea floor instability) or whether it should have a list (possible causes of sea floor instability).

Thanks a lot for your time and efforts

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2012, 09:14
@ Muki
I am out of my town and will reply as soon as I return
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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2012, 06:49
The point is, if GHs are reservoirs of energy that cause sea floor instability,, then A is correct (the phrase starting with “ possibly causing” is taken as a modifier). On the contrary, if GHs cause seafloor instability as a separate factor, then E is ok on the count of //ism alone, notwithstanding the intrusion of ‘even’ in that choice.
Coming to the factor of ‘the potential to be and the potential as’, if both are interchangeable as you have researched out, then GMAT may as well avoid this question altogether, not wanting to get caught in the muddle.
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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2012, 09:49
Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, are increasingly being studied for their potential to be huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability, and significant contributors to global warming.

I believe the answer is "A". It's idiomatic for Gas Hydrates TO BE X, AND Y. Answer choice E may be parallel, but by listing it out, it changes the meaning of the original sentence - Gas Hydrates......potential to be huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability, AND significant contributors to global warming. The "possibly causing sea floor instability" is modifying reservoirs of energy. Answer choice E separates them. Thus I believe answer choice A is correct.

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2014, 21:35
Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, are increasingly being
studied for their potential to be huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor
instability, and significant contributors to global warming
.
A. to be huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability, and
For parallelism, the construction has to be like
to be X, Y and Z
Here, X(huge reservoirs of energy) is not parallel to Y(possibly causing sea floor
instability)

B. to be huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability, and even as
Same as A
C. as huge reservoirs of energy, possibly causing sea floor instability, and
as X,Y and Z
Here also, X(huge reservoirs of energy) is not parallel to Y(possibly causing sea floor
instability)

D. as huge reservoirs of energy, and the possible cause of sea floor instability,
as X,Y and Z
Here also, X(huge reservoirs of energy) is not parallel to Y(the possible cause of sea floor instability)

E. as huge reservoirs of energy, as possible causes ofsea floor instability, and even as
Fits perfectly ! :wink:

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2015, 06:47
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Nusma,

We don't disagree. You just hit on ANOTHER reason why D is problematic. But my reasons are both legitimate, and in the end, more grammatically central than the parallelism issue, because we do sometimes parallel a singular and a plural: "I have three cookies and a glass of orange juice." OR "They are terrible musicians and a lousy comedy team."

Hope that makes sense!

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Hey Tom

in option E)
Does not even in the last clause makes the list unparallel??

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas, [#permalink]

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Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

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Re: Gas hydrates, chemical compounds of water and natural gas,   [#permalink] 23 Oct 2015, 02:16

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