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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief

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New post Updated on: 28 Oct 2018, 06:04
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A
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C
D
E

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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in that person’s nature; the misfortune is thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net” programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.

Which of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?

A. The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
B. The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of Greek tragedy.
C. Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
D. Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
E. The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.

Originally posted by serbiano on 28 Jan 2010, 00:07.
Last edited by gmat1393 on 28 Oct 2018, 06:04, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 05 Mar 2015, 06:11
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This question is part of the GMAT Club Critical Reasoning : Paradox Revision Project.

Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in that person’s nature; the misfortune is thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net” programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.

Which of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?

A. The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.

B. The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of Greek tragedy.

C. Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.

D. Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.

E. The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.
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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2012, 21:35
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Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that
the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in
that person’s nature; the misfortune is thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the
public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net”
programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense. Which
of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?
A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
b) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of
Greek tragedy.
c) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
d) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take
advantage of other social safety net programs.
e) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to
charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.

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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2010, 02:52
serbiano wrote:
1. Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized
the concept that the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but
rather a logical outcome of flaws in that person’s nature; the misfortune is
thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the public broadly supports
bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net” programs
that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.
Which of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the
statements above?
• The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their
society.
• The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare
than those of Greek tragedy.
• Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most
accidents. Correct.Causes both the events mentioned in the argument.
• Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy
or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
• The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to
contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters,
such as hurricanes.

OA and explanation will follow ...


An option that is a possible cause of the vents in the argument resolves the paradox in the argument.

OA plz?
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New post 28 Jan 2010, 03:45
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The fact that "some" people insist that society is to blame for misfortune does
not explain why the public today "broadly supports" social safety net programs.

So its not C. "some" is the easiest way to see why C is wrong
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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2010, 03:54
1
Maybe (E)?

Greek tragedy may remain one of the pillars of western belief system but there are other factors to consider too - that is religion.
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New post 28 Jan 2010, 07:22
• The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their
society.
CORRECT: as they didnothave any such "social security pgms",even if the greeks had broadly supported so
,there was no way they could have enrolled in them.But since today we have such programs and we enrol in them

• The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare
than those of Greek tragedy.
Shakespeare doesnot add anything to aolve the discrepancy
• Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most
accidents.
SOME people donot define the broad agreement
• Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy
or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
its not about taking advantage rather about wide accepatnce in safety programs
• The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to
contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters,
such as hurricanes.
out of context
so IMO: A
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New post 29 Jan 2010, 05:24
IMO : D

It resolves the paradox. It says that even though there is social safety net, Many people suffer for misfortune because of their own fault
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New post 29 Jan 2010, 10:53
1
1. Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized
the concept that the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but
rather a logical outcome of flaws in that person’s nature; the misfortune is
thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the public broadly supports
bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net” programs
that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.
Which of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the
statements above?
• The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their
society.
• The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare
than those of Greek tragedy.
• Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most
accidents.
• Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy
or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
• The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to
contribute to charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters,
such as hurricanes.

Would go with E... as the same shows another reason for the public today to be more inclined towards such programs. Hence this has got nothing to do with the Greek version of misfortune
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New post 31 Jan 2010, 16:43
would go with E because it does not contradicts either of the premises presented
1) greek belief that people are to blame for their own misfortunes
2) in our society today, we set up systems and networks to help those who are in need

The answer is saying that particular group of people, the religeous one, would still help others out, these group of people do not fall into the category of the ancient greek, thus they are willing to helps out others, this does not contradict the first premise, as we are not talking abot the same group of people. Also, it does not contradict the second premise.
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New post 31 Jan 2010, 23:32
6
OA is E

The statements above present a paradox. If, as the author implies, the ethos of
Greek tragedy still holds as an "enduring pillar of our belief system," an ethos
declaring each person's misfortune that person's fault, then the majority of the
public should not support "social safety net" programs, which are based on the
philosophical position that someone's misfortune is not necessarily his or her
fault.
(A) This choice does not resolve the paradox. The observation that the ancient
Greeks had few social safety net programs does not explain why the public today
supports such programs, while holding onto the ethos of Greek tragedy.
(B) This is an irrelevant comparison. This choice does not say that the public is
actually unfamiliar with Greek tragedy, and its greater familiarity with
Shakespeare does not explain the paradox.
(C) The fact that "some" people insist that society is to blame for misfortune does
not explain why the public today "broadly supports" social safety net programs.
(D) This choice does not resolve the paradox. Perhaps many destitute people do
not take advantage of social safety net programs because they feel ashamed --
maybe even guilty, as if they caused their own misfortunes (whether or not they
did), in accordance with the ethos of Greek tragedy. However, this observation
does not explain why these programs enjoy the broad support of the public.
(E) CORRECT. This statement undermines the author’s assumption that the
ethos of the ancient Greeks is the only operative component of the public's belief
system. If most people believe in helping innocent victims of natural disasters,
then they must believe that there can be "innocent victims" and that not all
misfortune is due to the actions and flaws of the individual in question.
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New post 02 May 2012, 07:12
IMO C is the right one.

I don't understand how E would resolve the paradox. Please explain.
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New post 02 May 2012, 09:10
I also do not see how E can be the answer....

A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
Not relevant to the argument...What the ancient Greeks had back then does not influence our decisions now

B) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of
Greek tragedy.
Shakespeare? We are only concerned with Greek influences...

C) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
Although the wording is a bit weak (i.e., stronger wording such as "all" or "most" would have been better to show how the public broadly supports people who are in need) this does the best job why people may help out others even though they're poor.

D) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
How is this relevant?

E) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to
charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.
This answer choice is only relevant to "innocent people injured in natural disasters." The examples given in the actual argument above states otherwise (i.e., "destitue" = those who are poor, impoverished, etc.)
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New post 03 May 2012, 02:24
Based on elimination strategy, i chose E. C has only "some people". E shows people's tendency/belief to help those in need even though the condition they are in is not their fault(innocent) which in turn explains the people's tendecy to help destitues as well.

I have noticed that answers involving "some", "a few" are seldom true(mostly in some weaken type of questions they are the answers.)
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New post 03 May 2012, 19:37
+1 C

E is out of scope. We are talking about the taxpayers, not about the people who give money to charities.
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New post 11 May 2012, 04:21
I also have doubts as to why the answer must be E.

A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
We are not concerned with Social Safety Net in the times of Greek. We are concerned with the current time only.

B) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of
Greek tragedy.
We are not concerned with works of Shakespeare or for that matter about Greek tragedies. Our concern is limited to the view held by Greek with respect to human tragedy.

C) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
As suggested, wording is weak. But it talks about accidents, role of individual and helps explain why an individual should help others in need.

D) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take advantage of other social safety net programs.
We are concerned with people who declare bankruptcy or who take advantage of Social Safety Net.

E) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to
charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.
It is correct by pointing towards the need to help others in need. But it talks of natural disasters and leaves out other accidents such as bankruptcy, social security net, etc. Also, it talks of money spent by charity and not tax-payer's money i.e. government help through social security net.

C is not entirely correct but appears a good choice among the given options.

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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief  [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2012, 09:21
Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that
the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in
that person’s nature; the misfortune is thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the
public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net”
programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense. Which
of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?
A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
b) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of
Greek tragedy.
c) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
d) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take
advantage of other social safety net programs.
e) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to
charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.

Main CR Qs link - cr-qs-600-700-level-131508.html[/quote]

+1 for C.
C clearly states that it is not the individual but the society who is to be blamed for most of the accidents. That's why though people believe that the misfortune is a person's fault, yet they shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense.
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New post 26 Jul 2012, 00:19
IMO C would be wrong because the passage mention "public broadly supports", whereas C is about some people.
Moreover natural disasters in option E can be supported by "the misfortune a person suffers" from the passage and "public broadly supports" will support "encourage people to contribute to charities" in the answer choice.
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New post 29 Oct 2012, 05:30
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GetThisDone wrote:
Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief system, dramatized the concept that
the misfortune a person suffers is not an accident, but rather a logical outcome of flaws in
that person’s nature; the misfortune is thus that person’s “fault.” Nonetheless, today the
public broadly supports bankruptcy protection, family welfare and other “social safety net”
programs that shield the destitute in the face of their hardships, at taxpayer expense. Which
of the following, if true, would best resolve the paradox in the statements above?
A) The ancient Greeks had few, if any, such social safety net programs in their society.
b) The majority of the public is more familiar with the works of Shakespeare than those of
Greek tragedy.
c) Some people insist that society, not the individual, is to blame for most accidents.
d) Many people in financial difficulties feel too ashamed to declare bankruptcy or to take
advantage of other social safety net programs.
e) The religions practiced by most people today strongly encourage people to contribute to
charities that assist innocent people injured in natural disasters, such as hurricanes.

Main CR Qs link - cr-qs-600-700-level-131508.html


I stumbled on this one...Indeed a toughie!
I got OE for this, hope it helps.

The statements above present a paradox. If, as the author implies, the ethos of
Greek tragedy still holds as an "enduring pillar of our belief system," an ethos
declaring each person's misfortune that person's fault, then the majority of the
public should not support "social safety net" programs, which are based on the
philosophical position that someone's misfortune is not necessarily his or her
fault.
(A) This choice does not resolve the paradox. The observation that the ancient
Greeks had few social safety net programs does not explain why the public today
supports such programs, while holding onto the ethos of Greek tragedy.
(B) This is an irrelevant comparison. This choice does not say that the public is
actually unfamiliar with Greek tragedy, and its greater familiarity with
Shakespeare does not explain the paradox.
(C) The fact that "some" people insist that society is to blame for misfortune
does not explain why the public today "broadly supports" social safety net
programs.
(D) This choice does not resolve the paradox. Perhaps many destitute people do
not take advantage of social safety net programs because they feel ashamed --
maybe even guilty, as if they caused their own misfortunes (whether or not they
did), in accordance with the ethos of Greek tragedy. However, this observation
does not explain why these programs enjoy the broad support of the public.
(E) CORRECT. This statement undermines the author’s assumption that the
ethos of the ancient Greeks is the only operative component of the public's belief
system. If most people believe in helping innocent victims of natural disasters,
then they must believe that there can be "innocent victims" and that not all
misfortune is due to the actions and flaws of the individual in question.

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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2012, 08:18
1
IMO E is the best answer.
Paradox : People are now contributing towards others misfortune; they should have been let to suffer as during ancient time.

Took time to eliminate C.
E states a reason for people's behavior today; C just gives an explanation for the thought of a few ppl. We do not know what was there previous belief. Hence E
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Re: Greek tragedy, one of the enduring pillars of our belief &nbs [#permalink] 20 Dec 2012, 08:18

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