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Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant

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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 18:45
still not convinced why answer A is incorrect. " need more solid explanations than "having doesn't sound right"
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2017, 07:18
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LakerFan24 wrote:
still not convinced why answer A is incorrect. " need more solid explanations than "having doesn't sound right"


"Having" + participle is used to depict a completed event, e.g.,
Having finished my lunch, I left for the station...... implies that AFTER I fnished my lunch, I left for the station.


The structure of option A is as follows:
Having been named for a nymph, the asteroid was discovered.
The above implies that the AFTER the asteroid was named, it was discovered. This is absurd because naming cannot happen before an asteroid is discovered.
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2018, 08:42
thanhmaitran wrote:
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

A. Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

C. In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

D. The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

E. Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.



Can someone please explain what is wrong with "and discovered in 1884" in option D?
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2018, 09:02
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aviejay wrote:
thanhmaitran wrote:
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

A. Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

C. In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

D. The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

E. Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.



Can someone please explain what is wrong with "and discovered in 1884" in option D?


The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter
two issues:
1. to orbit
2. The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph (who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884), is in.... this is also a different meaning coming up because of the placement of "and discovered in 1884".

Whenever you see choices keeping phrases here and there, then it means you should watch out for misplaced modifier issue. Such issues creates meaning issues.
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2018, 11:18
HKD1710 wrote:
aviejay wrote:
thanhmaitran wrote:
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

A. Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

C. In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

D. The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

E. Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.



Can someone please explain what is wrong with "and discovered in 1884" in option D?


The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter
two issues:
1. to orbit
2. The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph (who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884), is in.... this is also a different meaning coming up because of the placement of "and discovered in 1884".

Whenever you see choices keeping phrases here and there, then it means you should watch out for misplaced modifier issue. Such issues creates meaning issues.



Hi HKD1710,

I did no t understand your explanation in point 2. Could you please elaborate how is the meaning of the sentence changing?
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New post 10 Oct 2018, 01:25
thanhmaitran wrote:

(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.


GMATNinja, mikemcgarry, Hey, Can you please help me with the errors in D. One error which i have understood is that the usage of "to orbit" is incorrect.

Can you please comment on the parallelism in the noun modifier "named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884"

Thanks in Advance.
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2018, 20:24
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RajatGoel wrote:
thanhmaitran wrote:

(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.


GMATNinja, mikemcgarry, Hey, Can you please help me with the errors in D. One error which i have understood is that the usage of "to orbit" is incorrect.

Can you please comment on the parallelism in the noun modifier "named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884"

Thanks in Advance.

The use of "to orbit" is the most glaring issue in (D). If I write, "Tim is in class to learn," I'm communicating that Tim has a conscious intent and motivation for being in class -- in other words, he wants to learn. Similarly, in "The asteroid Ida is in the middle of the belt of asteroids...to orbit the sun," it sounds as the asteroid is a conscious entity that's placed itself in the middle of this belt because it wishes to orbit the sun. Outside of science fiction or maybe a Michael Bay movie, a conscious asteroid is not logical.

As for "and discovered" I wouldn't say that it's wrong so much as it is confusing. In "named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884," the "and" is a parallel marker. At first glance, it appears as though "discovered" is parallel to the verb "cared," and we're getting ready to figure out what this nymph discovered -- except that the nymph didn't discover anything. In reality, it only makes sense for "discovered" to be parallel to the modifier "named," but it's very difficult to see this without rereading the sentence a few times. The OA doesn't create the same confusion, and that's a big part of why (B) is correct.

I hope this helps!
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Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Mar 2019, 10:01
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and figure out the correct choice! First, let's take a quick look at the original question, and highlight any obvious differences between the options in orange:

Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.
(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.
(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.
(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.
(E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Whenever you see the entire sentence underlined, you have to think about both the minor differences between the options and the overall grammar issue the entire sentence deals with:

1. that orbit / to orbit (idioms)
2. having been named / named / which was named (verb tense)

...and our overall grammar concept?

3. Modifiers (placement and usage)


To begin, let's start with #1 on our list: that orbit vs. to orbit. This is an easy one that will knock 2-3 options out of contention quickly. It is idiomatically correct to say that "objects that orbit" and not "objects to orbit." So, let's see which options do this correctly:

(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.
(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.
(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.
(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.
(E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

We can eliminate options D & E because they don't use the right idiom "that orbit." How easy was that? Sometimes, starting with the simplest differences can rule out several wrong options without much effort!

Now that we're down to 3 options, let's focus on #2: verb tense. We know that these events happened in a particular order:

1. An asteroid was discovered in 1884.
2. The asteroid was named Ida after a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.
3. Ida is located in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the sun between Mars and Jupiter.


Let's make sure that the verb tenses throughout each sentence tell the events in the right order, and don't create any confusion:

(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

This is INCORRECT because it puts the events in the wrong order! By using the past perfect "having been named," this suggests that the asteroid was named Ida BEFORE it was discovered?? That doesn't make sense, does it? Let's eliminate this one.

(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

This is CORRECT! The past tense "discovered" clearly shows that the asteroid was discovered in the past. The word "named" here is being used as a modifier, so it's fine how it is. We also like the use of the present tense "is" to show that Ida is still currently located in the same place, which makes sense!

(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

This is INCORRECT because it's a sentence fragment! We have two modifiers (highlighted in red), and a subject - but it's missing a verb altogether!

There you go - option B is the correct choice! It uses the right idiom "that orbit" and it's a complete sentence with the right verb tenses!


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Originally posted by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 06 Nov 2018, 16:56.
Last edited by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 29 Mar 2019, 10:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2018, 14:40
I hate to complain, but with exception to the expert's replies in here most users are eliminating (A) for no solid grounds.

I got this correct, but i found it more difficult than the difficulty implied by the timer statistic here.

To be clear, (A) is incorrect because "Having been named..." is a past perfect verb that implies the asteroid was named before it's discovery in 1884.
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New post 27 Jun 2019, 15:41
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

To make it simple. Lets arrange the sentence in a sequence of Event.

Means 1. something discovered in 1884
2. They named
3. n the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter


(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884. ( WRONG) : Having been ( GMAT never prefer)

(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. ( CORRECT ANSWER)

(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter. ( WRONG)

(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. (WRONG)

(E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.(WRONG)
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2020, 12:30
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter.

(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

(E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

A. incorrect. Meaning error. We want to state facts. Asteroid which was named something and discovered in some year orbits Sun. Using having been named unnecessarily indicates that the asteroid was named first and discovered later.

B. Correct answer.

C. Verb missing.

D. 'to orbit' incorrectly indicates a purpose.

E. Same error as D.
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New post 09 Apr 2020, 00:10
B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Would anyone please advise the point I am missing? Since the main verb of this sentence is present tense (is), the participle phrase "Discovered in 1884," means "the asteroid Ida is discovered in 1884", which does not make sense. That is why I thought "Having been discovered in 1884," would be correct, and B was wrong... Am I making a misunderstanding?

Thank you for your help!
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New post 09 Apr 2020, 06:13
kazup wrote:
B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Would anyone please advise the point I am missing? Since the main verb of this sentence is present tense (is), the participle phrase "Discovered in 1884," means "the asteroid Ida is discovered in 1884", which does not make sense. That is why I thought "Having been discovered in 1884," would be correct, and B was wrong... Am I making a misunderstanding?

Thank you for your help!
Hi kazup,

Discovered is a (past participle) modifier. It doesn't really have a tense the way that verbs do. But you already seem to know that, so I'm not sure how you arrived at the rest of what you wrote in your post. Have you come across a "rule" like that somewhere?
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2020, 19:22
AjiteshArun wrote:
kazup wrote:
B. Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Would anyone please advise the point I am missing? Since the main verb of this sentence is present tense (is), the participle phrase "Discovered in 1884," means "the asteroid Ida is discovered in 1884", which does not make sense. That is why I thought "Having been discovered in 1884," would be correct, and B was wrong... Am I making a misunderstanding?

Thank you for your help!
Hi,

Discovered is a (past participle) modifier. It doesn't really have a tense the way that verbs do. But you already seem to know that, so I'm not sure how you arrived at the rest of what you wrote in your post. Have you come across a "rule" like that somewhere?


Hello AjiteshArun, thank you very much for your reply!

As for the participle clause, I learned the following rule from a book: "Participle clauses do not have a specific tense. The tense is indicated by the verb in the main clause."

I thought "Discovered in 1884" was a participle clause but is it just an adjective phrase modifying "Ida"? (maybe that is why I was confusing.. !)
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2020, 19:48
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kazup wrote:
Hello AjiteshArun, thank you very much for your reply!

As for the participle clause, I learned the following rule from a book: "Participle clauses do not have a specific tense. The tense is indicated by the verb in the main clause."

I thought "Discovered in 1884" was a participle clause but is it just an adjective phrase modifying "Ida"? (maybe that is why I was confusing.. !)
Hi kazup,

There are quite a few people here who seem to follow that rule, but it is definitely not something that I am familiar with. As far as I know, the burden of identifying the intended meaning is on the reader. The tense of the main verb could be one of the things that a reader could use to get to that meaning, but I just don't see how the main verb can always determine the participle's meaning.

That said, it could be that I am missing something here, and it would be great to get more opinions on this.
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New post 09 May 2020, 17:47
daagh wrote:
A. Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884. --- The core activity that Ida is in the midst of other asteroids is just expressed a in prepositional modifier without the verb ‘is’

How do we know that the core activity is not the discovery if Ida in 1884?
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New post 21 May 2020, 02:52
(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit [/u]the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Does anyone know why the verb 'orbit' is not 'orbits' given 'the belt of asteroids' is sigular??
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New post 21 May 2020, 03:38
mlstcom4ed wrote:
(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit [/u]the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Does anyone know why the verb 'orbit' is not 'orbits' given 'the belt of asteroids' is sigular??

Whether the verb should be orbit or orbits, depends on what that is modifying.

In this case, that modifies asteroids (plural) and hence, the correct verb is orbit.

Basically the sentence is conveying:
i) There are a number of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter
ii) Asteroid lda is in the middle of such belt of asteroids

Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses modifier issues of "that", its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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New post 21 May 2020, 18:35
Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884.

(A) Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, the asteroid named Ida, in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, was discovered in 1884. - "Having been named" is in the past perfect continuous tense; past perfect continuous tense indicates that the main event (a event in the past) occurred before another event from the past. So, the main event here is 'the naming for...' while the other event from the past is 'the discovery'. The usage of past perfect continuous to highlight 'the naming for..' action now literally means that the 'naming' happened before the 'discovery'. How would this make any sense? Hence, eliminate (A)

(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. - here, both the events ('the discovery' and 'the naming') are indicated in the simple past tense, the usage of which is absolutely correct (when we try to indicate two events that occur within the same time period in the past). Hence, (B) is the correct answer choice.

(C) In the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, the asteroid lda, discovered in 1884 and named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter. - The structure of the sentence here is as follows: [Modifier], [Noun], [Modifier]. So, where is the main verb? what exactly is happening to the subject of the sentence? This structure has no clear meaning and is therefore considered incorrect. Hence, eliminate (C)


(D) The asteroid Ida, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter and discovered in 1884, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. - The asteroid...... is in the middle...to orbit the sun?? This does not make any sense. Hence, eliminate (D)


(E) Ida, an asteroid discovered in 1884 and which was named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids to orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. - Ida,....., is in the middle... to orbit? This does not make any sense. Hence, eliminate (E)
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New post 23 May 2020, 14:19
EducationAisle wrote:
mlstcom4ed wrote:
(B) Discovered in 1884, the asteroid lda, named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant Jupiter, is in the middle of the belt of asteroids that orbit [/u]the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

Does anyone know why the verb 'orbit' is not 'orbits' given 'the belt of asteroids' is sigular??

Whether the verb should be orbit or orbits, depends on what that is modifying.

In this case, that modifies asteroids (plural) and hence, the correct verb is orbit.

Basically the sentence is conveying:
i) There are a number of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter
ii) Asteroid lda is in the middle of such belt of asteroids

Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses modifier issues of "that", its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.


Isn't 'the bell of' in 'the belt of asteroids' singular ?
For example,in another question, In some types of pine tree, a thick layer of needles protects the buds from which new growth proceeds; consequently they are able to withstand forest fires relatively well.
, "..a thick layer of needles protects the buds ".
How to explain the differences between these two applications?
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Re: Having been named for a mythological nymph who cared for the infant   [#permalink] 23 May 2020, 14:19

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