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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 13:15
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2017, 09:34
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Thanks Ninja for your kind response. In that case, I make bold to re -present it here!

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear---- 1. if it …. it may refer to heavy commitment or the course 2. makes it … it refers perhaps to commitment or course or action -- no clear referent for 'it'.


B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. --- unparallel around the fanboy 'or'

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. --- if it has …it may refer to course or action or trouble. No clarity.

D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. -- 1. no clear referent for 'it' as usual 2. makes them-- 'them' refers to executives but there is no 'executives', only 'executives' is there 3. 'misinterpreting is unparallel with 'miss'. misinterpreting "them" -- them refers to signs - error of one pronoun referring to two different nouns in one clause.


E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. ----- Correct choice. Being as part of a substantive noun is acceptable. 'them' refers to signs.

A nice question on pronoun reference; also brings out a rare instance in which 'being' is accepted as a correct expression in GMAT
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2017, 07:13
souvik101990 wrote:
Edit: This discussion has retired. Please find the new thread HERE


The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 776
Page: 704


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Great SC Question.
I was deliberating between C & E, but that 'it' near the end of C made me feel iffy, as I couldn't pin point it's antecedent. Went with E instead, although I like staying clear of being because E seemed to be the best answer choice in the lot.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 08:34
Can we reject A, C, D on the basis of incorrect usage of if, then conditional verb?
I mean, don't we have to have a then clause for every "if" clause?

In this sentence, it is written as
"especially if it has worked well". There is no "then clause" after it.

Please advise on this point.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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Harshani wrote:
Can we reject A, C, D on the basis of incorrect usage of if, then conditional verb?
I mean, don't we have to have a then clause for every "if" clause?

In this sentence, it is written as
"especially if it has worked well". There is no "then clause" after it.

Please advise on this point.



Hello Harshani,

I would be glad to help you with this query. :-)

We need a then clause with an if clause when the intended meaning is to say If A happens, then B happens.

However, the context of this sentence is slightly different from what I have mentioned above.

In a way the main clause acts as the then clause for the if clause mentioned in this official sentence. Simple put, the sentence says that if a course of action has worked well for someone in the past, then heavy commitment towards the same makes the person miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Hence, there is no error in the usage of if clause in Choices A, C, and D.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 10:56
E
This is one of those SC questions which have 'being' in the correct answer.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. What does 'it' refer to is unclear

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. gives the idea that an executive is the one that worked well in the past

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. modifier 'especially if it has worked well in the past' is wrongly placed. It modifies course of action and should be placed immediately after it

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. 'them' refers to 'executives being' - incorrect. Also 'miss' and 'misinterpreting' are not parallel.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. No error - Correct

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 11:27
Hi,
In almost 95% of the cases the use of Being is considered incorrect. Can anybody brief in what situations is the use of Being correct. In this questions the word Being seems to appear as a Verb.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 11:34
TalalAzam wrote:
Hi,
In almost 95% of the cases the use of Being is considered incorrect. Can anybody brief in what situations is the use of Being correct. In this questions the word Being seems to appear as a Verb.


Hi TalalAzam ,

You can get help for your question from here.

Feel free to reach out for any questions.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 13:06
abhimahna wrote:
TalalAzam wrote:
Hi,
In almost 95% of the cases the use of Being is considered incorrect. Can anybody brief in what situations is the use of Being correct. In this questions the word Being seems to appear as a Verb.


Hi TalalAzam ,

You can get help for your question from here.

Feel free to reach out for any questions.


Hey Thanks !
This is really helpful. Sorts out the confusion.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 06:29
LakerFan24 wrote:
I go with E.

Strangely enough, I always make a note of "being", and more often than not, I find A/C that contain that word are wrong. However, this is why I selected "E" here:

E. [Being heavily committed to a course of action = modifier], [especially one that has worked well in the past = modifier], is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- Note: the EXECUTIVE is clearly either (a) missing signs of something; or (b) misinterpreting something. Both are in the same tense, and obviously linked to the Executive.

I was only considering "B" or "C" in addition to "E"

B: An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
-- Does the course of action make missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely OR is it the executive who does these verbs?

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
-- "it" is singular but the A/C is talking about two things: either "miss signs of incipient trouble" or "misinterpret signs of incipient trouble"


Hi,

The construction of the sentence in option E is MODIFIER, MODIFIER, is likely ......

Shouldn't the sentence after the modifier begin with the word that is being modified, in this case, being heavily committed...., modifier, executives .....??

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 06:40
pra1785 wrote:
LakerFan24 wrote:
I go with E.

Strangely enough, I always make a note of "being", and more often than not, I find A/C that contain that word are wrong. However, this is why I selected "E" here:

E. [Being heavily committed to a course of action = modifier], [especially one that has worked well in the past = modifier], is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- Note: the EXECUTIVE is clearly either (a) missing signs of something; or (b) misinterpreting something. Both are in the same tense, and obviously linked to the Executive.

I was only considering "B" or "C" in addition to "E"

B: An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
-- Does the course of action make missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely OR is it the executive who does these verbs?

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
-- "it" is singular but the A/C is talking about two things: either "miss signs of incipient trouble" or "misinterpret signs of incipient trouble"


Hi,

The construction of the sentence in option E is MODIFIER, MODIFIER, is likely ......

Shouldn't the sentence after the modifier begin with the word that is being modified, in this case, being heavily committed...., modifier, executives .....??


Being in this question acts as a part of a Noun.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink]

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A small pamphlet on the correct use of 'being'

Typically usage of "being" makes the answer choice wordy and awkward. Nevertheless, it has been deprecated so much as if it is an untouchable word. However, there are two perfectly correct usages of this word. Being cognizant of these usages is important. Moreover, make sure you do not blindly eliminate an answer choice just because you see the word "being" in it.

Correct Usage 1 - When Being is used as part of a noun phrase or as a substantive phrase. For example
Being disrespectful to elders is not an acceptable behavior. Remember this noun phrase containing the gerund 'being' will always be accompanied by verb after it. If you don't see a verb, then 'being' wouldn’t be a correct usage.
Notice the noun phrase acting as the subject here - being disrespectful to her elders

Correct Usage 2 - When passive continuous verb tense is required to communicate the meaning. For example:
The residents of this 100-year old apartment complex are being evacuated because of structural instability of the building.
Notice the verb tense here - are being evacuated-present continuous written in passive voice. If you don't see the helping verb - anything such as is, are, was, were will be. would be , and so on-, before being, then be sure ' being is not being used properly.

Correct use of being --- some Official examples

1. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. Ans E

2. Simply because they are genetically engineered does not make it anymore likely for plants to become an invasive or persistent weed, according to a decade-long study published in the journal Nature.

A. because they are genetically engineered does not make it any more likely for plants to
B. because it is genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to
C. being genetically engineered does not make it any more likely that plants will
D. being genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to
E. being genetically engineered does not make a plant anymore likely that it will become D

3. According to one expert, the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not so much that dogs are being bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria as that the breeds have relatively few founding members.

(A) the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not so much that dogs are being bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria
(B) the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not as much their being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria as much
(C) it is not so much the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog that they are being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria as much
(D) it is not so much that the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is their being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria so much
(E) it is not so much the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog to be bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria Ans B

4. A year advantage in a new computer product or process being introduced can give a company a significant edge on its competitors.
a. A year advantage in a new computer product or process being introduced
b. Introducing a new computer product or process by a year earlier
c. A year's advantage to introduce a new computer product or process
d. To introduce a new computer product or process by a year earlier
e. Being a year ahead in introducing a new computer product or process Ans. E


5. The artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir's last word was "flowers," spoken as a bouquet consisting of roses just picked from his garden were arranged in a vase on his bedroom windowsill.

a. as a bouquet consisting of roses just picked from his garden were arranged
b. as a bouquet of roses, just picked from his garden, were arranged
c. as a bouquet of roses just picked from his garden was being arranged...
d.during the arrangement of a bouquet of roses, just picked from his garden
e. while they arranged a bouquet of roses that had just been picked, from his garden Ans C

6. In these difficult economic times, those who have public pensions – veterans, mail workers, firemen, and others – are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies that operate without much oversight from banking regulators, but they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

a. are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies that operate without much oversight from banking regulators, but they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

b.are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies, which operate without much oversight from banking regulators but are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

c.are pursued strongly by pension advance companies and operate without much oversight from banking regulators but are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

d.are pursued strongly by pension advance companies, operating without much oversight from banking regulators but now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

e. are pursued strongly by pension advance companies who operate without much oversight from banking regulators; however, they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations
Ans B

7. The survival of coral colonies, which are composed of innumerable tiny polyps living in a symbiotic relationship with brilliantly colored algae, are being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants like agricultural runoff, oil slicks, and trash, but also by dropped anchors, probing divers, and global warming.

A. are being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants like

B. are being threatened, experts say, by not only pollutants such as

C. is not only being threatened, experts say, by pollutants such as

D. is not only being threatened, experts say, by pollutants like

E. is being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants such as

Ans E.

Hope this will be some use to beginners at least.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,   [#permalink] 21 Aug 2017, 08:06

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