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Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous

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Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2007, 07:10
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A
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Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.
A. cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are
B. cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
C. cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are
D. cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
E. cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are
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New post 18 Jan 2007, 10:28
E?

Because of the "they" referring to the tomatoes; also the construction of D "although more flavorful." sounds awkward.
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New post 18 Jan 2007, 11:09
E. The semicolon separates two complete and related sentences correctly. D's "or with..." sounds awkward.
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New post 18 Jan 2007, 11:21
A should be fine, use of 'they' is not clear in other choices.
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New post 18 Jan 2007, 20:38
Straight A.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

The part in red should refer to Heirloom tomatoes and not their cousins while the one in blue to the cousins.
Only A maintains this logical structure.
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New post 19 Jan 2007, 01:35
buzzgaurav wrote:
Straight A.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

The part in red should refer to Heirloom tomatoes and not their cousins while the one in blue to the cousins.
Only A maintains this logical structure.


Buzzgaurav, how can "often green and striped" refers to the "cousins" when the argument has clearly stated that the "cousins" are round and red?

Going for E. Agree with jylo on the comments on semicolon. Besides, "they" clearly refers to the Heirloom tomatoes, well at least in my eyes :-D Comments?
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New post 19 Jan 2007, 02:18
jylo wrote:
E. The semicolon separates two complete and related sentences correctly. D's "or with..." sounds awkward.


OA is E.
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New post 19 Jan 2007, 04:18
buzzgaurav wrote:
Straight A.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

The part in red should refer to Heirloom tomatoes and not their cousins while the one in blue to the cousins.
Only A maintains this logical structure.


Glaring mistake. :oops: . I think I need to be more focussed. Thanks Hang Tuah for pointing that out.
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New post 19 Jan 2007, 09:18
But then 'they' in E has two potential nouns it can refer back to?
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Re: SC: Heirloom tomatoes [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2007, 20:26
aurobindo wrote:
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.
A. cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are
B. cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
C. cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are
D. cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
E. cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are


A, B, and C are awkward and ungrammatical. The phrases "often green and striped..." are positioned to qualify "their round and red supermarket cousins" but they should qualify "heirloom tomatos".

D violates //ism:
"they are often green and striped" or
"they are with plenty of bumps and bruises"?
Wrong.

In D and E, the semicolon after cousins indicates that a second independent clause follows, so "they" clearly refers to the subject of the first independent clause, heirloom tomatoes.

E, although a bit lengthy, is grammatical and keeps the meaning.
Re: SC: Heirloom tomatoes   [#permalink] 19 Jan 2007, 20:26
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