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Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous

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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 17:16
icandy wrote:
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

(A) cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are
(B) cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(C) cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are
(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are

Please explain your answer.


It is clear from the question stem that the sentence from "often green and striped..." is used for the main subject of the sentence which is "Heirloom tomatoes". Use of above sentence directly after comma makes it as misplaced modifier. To overcome this, there are two choices-
1. Complete first sentence and begin another with subject as "Heirloom tomatoes"
2. break the sentence with ";" and begin with preposition.

Answer E perfectly fits into this.

D has been excluded since the sentence "or with plenty of bumps and bruises" demands further closing sentence to fulfil conditional explanation started at "with".
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 18:13
E
cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are

When we use pronoun after semicolon , then it refers to the subject in the sentence preceding the semicolon. So here , they is not ambiguous.
Conjunction 'or' has successfully linked two clauses. They before 'or' is used in both the clauses connected by 'or'.
"But they are" : In this 'but' is correctly joining two sentences . "They are ...to bruises" and "they are more flavourful".
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes - again starting the thread [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 21:35
Above question has already been discussed in this forum.

But I need more explanation in reference to the usage of although in D.

Someone wrote in the previous three that Although don't have a subject in D, hence option D is wrong.

Please explain the above concept in detail.
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes - again starting the thread [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 23:18
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.
The 2 bold parts are Subject and Verb of the sentence. Therefore, often green and striped part constitutes a run-on sentence. -> eliminate A, B, C.

(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although more flavorful
(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are more flavorful
To my view, the 2 above sentences successfully deliver the meaning of the original sentence excepting the bold part in D.
Although is used to convey a contrast meaning with the previous part. D should be correct if the previous part told somethings not flavorful -> E will be wrong.
But in the previous part of the sentence, it deals with other issues. Therefore, 'but' is more suitable
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes - again starting the thread [#permalink]

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vivekdixit07 wrote:
Above question has already been discussed in this forum.

But I need more explanation in reference to the usage of although in D.

Someone wrote in the previous three that Although don't have a subject in D, hence option D is wrong.

Please explain the above concept in detail.


The word "although" kicks of a dependent CLAUSE and needs a cleear subject.

Examples:

Although they had no umbrellas, the excited children ran outside to enjoy the summer rainstorm. -- Logical and Correct.
Although had no umbrellas, the excited children ran outside to enjoy the summer rainstorm - Illogical without the subject "they".

In option D [although are more flavorful], "although" does not have an explicit (or even clearly implied) subject, therefore it is incorrect.

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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2012, 00:11
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although more flavorful.

Subject: Heirloom tomatoes
Verb: appetizing

Whats wrong with answer choice B?

"often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although" is modifying/describing red supermarket cousins? isn't that true?

In ans choise E -

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are more flavorful.

why is "they" not ambiguous? they can refer to Heirloom tomatoes or red supermarket cousins.
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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KuttingChai

B is incorrect because the comma makes it a run on sentence. It is modifying the red supermarket cousins but that is not the intent of the statement. The "green and striped" is for the heirloom tomatoes. ( how can red cousins be green )

By replacing the comma with ";" we make each a separate clause. The subject of the first clause(Heirloom tomatoes) matches with subject of the second (they).

Also, the "Although" in B is incorrect as explained in the posts above.

Hope it helps :)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2013, 00:21
Does Although need to be followed by a clause always? can't it introduce a phrase?
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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Sachin9 wrote:
Does Although need to be followed by a clause always? can't it introduce a phrase?


Yup. 'Although' cannot introduce phrases. It is a sub-ordinate conjunction (generally placed before a complete sentence or independent clause to make that clause dependent)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2013, 15:09
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

(A) cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are
(B) cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(C) cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are
(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are




Here we have a comparsion between the Heirloom tomatoes which is saved from the previous year and the supermarket Tomatoes often green and striped or have plenty of bumps and bruises but they are more flavorful

clearly the supermarket tomatoes are more flavorful

lets break the sentence into individual clauses

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and
red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises,
but are more flavorful.

Here the subject is Heirloom tomatoes
verb is look less appetizing
saved from the previous year is clearly modifying the closest noun Heirloom Tomatoes
The error in the below sentence is parallelism error and there is no subject after but


so the answer is E
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2013, 00:05
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

(A) cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are --- it is given that cousins are round and red -- how can they be green and striped also --- hence wrong ---- WRONG MEANING
(B) cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although --- same as A
(C) cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are ---- SAME AS ABOVE
(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although--HERE GREEN AND STRIPPED REFER TO HEIRLOOM TAMAMOES BUT SENTENCE NOT PARALLEL
(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are -- SAME AS d BUT SENTENCE IS PARALLEL AND HENCE CORRECT
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2013, 12:26
smashingpumpkins wrote:
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

(A) cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are

(B) cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although

(C) cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are

(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although

(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are


This is a meaning/modifier/parallelism SC so I would rate it at the 650 level

First three are incorrect answer choices. The clause often green and striped is meant to refer to Heirloom tomatoes not their cousins. Next, semi-colon is appropiate to separate both ideas.
Now between D and E, 'E' might look a little longer but its fine! It expresses the idea clearly in the last part after the comma showing //ism too (they are....but they are)

Looking good

E is our best choice

Hope it helps!
Cheers
J :)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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jlgdr wrote:

First three are incorrect answer choices. The clause often green and striped is meant to refer to Heirloom tomatoes not their cousins. Next, semi-colon is appropiate to separate both ideas.
Now between D and E, 'E' might look a little longer but its fine! It expresses the idea clearly in the last part after the comma showing //ism too (they are....but they are)

Looking good

E is our best choice

Hope it helps!
Cheers
J :)



Between D & E,
Although should always be followed by a bonafide noun-verb. In D, there is no noun after although. So the usage is wrong.
In E, comma + but is the co-ordinating conjunction which is properly connecting the independent clauses.
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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icandy wrote:
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are more flavorful.

(A) cousins, often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but are
(B) cousins, often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(C) cousins, often green and striped, or they have plenty of bumps and bruises, although they are
(D) cousins; they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises, although
(E) cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are.

kinjiGC wrote:
Hi Mike,
I would like to have your inputs on the question. I prefer option E) to A) but I am not sure. Can you please explain once.
Thanks, Kinjal

Dear Kinjal,
I am happy to respond. :-) This questions is quite curious, because it's almost identical in topic to OG13, SC #132, and uses many of the same phrases, though in a different order. I would think that GMAC might be a position to sue a company for having a question so blatantly similar to its own. That does give me a bit of concern about the question and its authors.

In (A) - (C), among other problems, there's modifier ambiguity. We know logically that "often green and striped" should apply to heirloom tomatoes, but it touches "their round and red supermarket cousins." That's less than ideal.

Also, in (A), if we remove the modifying detail, the logic is wonky: "Heirloom tomatoes ... only look less appetizing ... or have plenty of bumps and bruises" ??? Why is that a choice, to "look less appetizing" vs. "to have bumps and bruises"? Joining these two verbs with "or" makes no sense. That's why (A) is definitively wrong.

The semicolon divide is a very clean, clear way to delineate the logic of the sentence. The parallelism removes any ambiguity about the pronoun: the pronoun "they" is subject of the second clause, so it is obviously in parallel to the subject of the first clause, and that first subject, "Heirloom tomatoes," is the antecedent. This is why (E) is the best answer.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2017, 11:00
mikemcgarry wrote:
I am happy to respond. :-) This questions is quite curious, because it's almost identical in topic to OG13, SC #132, and uses many of the same phrases, though in a different order. I would think that GMAC might be a position to sue a company for having a question so blatantly similar to its own. That does give me a bit of concern about the question and its authors.

In (A) - (C), among other problems, there's modifier ambiguity. We know logically that "often green and striped" should apply to heirloom tomatoes, but it touches "their round and red supermarket cousins." That's less than ideal.

Also, in (A), if we remove the modifying detail, the logic is wonky: "Heirloom tomatoes ... only look less appetizing ... or have plenty of bumps and bruises" ??? Why is that a choice, to "look less appetizing" vs. "to have bumps and bruises"? Joining these two verbs with "or" makes no sense. That's why (A) is definitively wrong.

The semicolon divide is a very clean, clear way to delineate the logic of the sentence. The parallelism removes any ambiguity about the pronoun: the pronoun "they" is subject of the second clause, so it is obviously in parallel to the subject of the first clause, and that first subject, "Heirloom tomatoes," is the antecedent. This is why (E) is the best answer.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,
In the first clause of this sentence, "their" was used to refer to "Heirloom tomatoes". is that the reason why "they" in the latter clause ambiguity-free?
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Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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oldest wrote:
Hi Mike,
In the first clause of this sentence, "their" was used to refer to "Heirloom tomatoes". is that the reason why "they" in the latter clause ambiguity-free?

Dear oldest,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, many factors contribute to establishing the relationship of a pronoun to its antecedent. Here's the OA, version (E):
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises, but they are more flavorful.
What contributes to our understanding that the highlighted pronoun "they" refers back to "heirloom tomatoes"?
1) As you suggest, just a single pronoun is used, with consistent antecedent, throughout the sentence
2) Parallelism. When we have two independent clauses in parallel, and a pronoun is the subject of the second, the parallelism strongly suggests that the subject of the first should be the antecedent.
3) Rhetoric. Think about it: what is the subject and focus of the entire sentence? Of course, "heirloom tomatoes." The fact that the entire sentence focuses on this single topic strongly suggests that any pronoun would be referring back to this focus.
In this well-crafted sentence, all three of these elements work in concert to reinforce one another. This makes 100% clear the antecedent of the pronoun.

Do not take the pronoun-antecedent relationship for granted. There are always many different elements of the sentence, at many different levels, contributing this relationship.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2017, 10:10
Hi expert,
In my 2 cents,option D could be a good contender of this question.
Option A,B,and C are gone as "often green and stripe" wrongly modifies cousins.
"they" in option E is not ambiguous;"they",as the subject" all refer to Heirloom tomatoes.
However,I find it difficult to eliminate option D.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or (they are)with plenty of bumps and bruises, although more flavorful.
or it is only acceptable only the 2nd independent clause reads ", although more flavorful,they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises.

Please shed some light on this
Thanks :-)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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sleepynut wrote:
Hi expert,
In my 2 cents,option D could be a good contender of this question.
Option A,B,and C are gone as "often green and stripe" wrongly modifies cousins.
"they" in option E is not ambiguous;"they",as the subject" all refer to Heirloom tomatoes.
However,I find it difficult to eliminate option D.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or (they are)with plenty of bumps and bruises, although more flavorful.
or it is only acceptable only the 2nd independent clause reads ", although more flavorful,they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises.

Please shed some light on this
Thanks :-)


"Although" ideally introduces a clause. However there are official questions, in which the phrase "Although+ adjective" is constructed to be used as a modifier - in such case the modifier should touch the noun it modifies. Here "although more flavorful" should touch "they".
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sleepynut wrote:
Hi expert,
In my 2 cents,option D could be a good contender of this question.
Option A,B,and C are gone as "often green and stripe" wrongly modifies cousins.
"they" in option E is not ambiguous;"they",as the subject" all refer to Heirloom tomatoes.
However,I find it difficult to eliminate option D.

Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or (they are)with plenty of bumps and bruises, although more flavorful.
or it is only acceptable only the 2nd independent clause reads ", although more flavorful,they are often green and striped, or with plenty of bumps and bruises.

Please shed some light on this
Thanks :-)

Dear sleepynut,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's (D):
Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous year, only look less appetizing than their round and red supermarket cousins; they are often green and striped, or (they are) with plenty of bumps and bruises, although (they are) more flavorful.
A few things to notice about (D).
1) It demands the implied subject-verb "they are" twice, two clauses in a row. Not grammatically wrong, but not exactly the most elegant and compelling structure.
2) Think about the phrasing: "they are with plenty of bumps and bruises." That's 100% grammatically correct, but extremely awkward. The natural thing to say would be "they [color=#00a651]have plenty of bumps and bruises[/color]." That is what a native speaker would say. Consider similar examples:
My friend is with a new car. = awkward
My friend has a new car. = natural
Company X is with 5000 employees. = awkward
Company X has 5000 employees. = natural
Again, the "with" examples here are 100% grammatically correct, but they are terribly "off" in a way that would sound jarring to a native ear. By contrast, the "has" construction sounds direct and clear: despite the simplicity, it has a kind of no-nonsense power that the "with" version dismally lacks.

Notice that (E) gets both of these things correct: (E) looks stellar where (D) falls in the mud. (E) is the best answer.

Mike :-)
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Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2017, 09:04
In this question if we go by meaning, we can easily eliminate option A, B and C. among D and E, i opted for E as because D has following issues :

with plenty of bumps and bruises - parallelism is not maintained
although - there is no verb
Re: Heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved from the previous   [#permalink] 12 Mar 2017, 09:04

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