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How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the

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How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2010, 13:42
2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

69% (00:59) correct 31% (00:57) wrong based on 94 sessions

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How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the state long jump finals?

(1) On his final jump, Ken exceeded the average length of his first four jumps by 2.5 feet.
(2) Ken’s final jump increased the length of his average (arithmetic mean) jump from 22.5 feet to 23 feet.
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Re: DS - Princeton, not satisfied with OA, please discuss  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2010, 13:55
In B it is not specified the average is of 4 jumps, then how B will be sufficient. However, in A, though it is not sufficient, it is clearly specified that 'en exceeded the average length of his first four jumps by 2.5 feet.'. My question about B is that how can we make sure that 22.5 is not his career average?
mailash wrote:
B is sufficient
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New post 06 Mar 2010, 16:39
B it is...from the question you can infer that there were 4 jumps....
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New post 06 Mar 2010, 17:33
Sir Don Bradman played 10 matches, what is his average in 10th match?

1. In his final match, Sir Don Bradman exceeded the average of his first nine matches by 2.5.
2. Bradman’s final match increased the average (arithmetic mean) from 99.94 to 100.
amma4u wrote:
B it is...from the question you can infer that there were 4 jumps....


Now in the above example how will we find out that average 100 is his total career average or 10 matches average? Matter of fact, world knows that average 99.94 is his career average and not only 10 match average? With the same analogy how do we know that 23 feet is Ken's 4 jump average and not his career average?

Don't you think that B is ambiguous?
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Re: DS - Princeton, not satisfied with OA, please discuss  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2010, 22:34
reply2spg wrote:
Sir Don Bradman played 10 matches, what is his average in 10th match?

1. In his final match, Sir Don Bradman exceeded the average of his first nine matches by 2.5.
2. Bradman’s final match increased the average (arithmetic mean) from 99.94 to 100.
amma4u wrote:
B it is...from the question you can infer that there were 4 jumps....


Now in the above example how will we find out that average 100 is his total career average or 10 matches average? Matter of fact, world knows that average 99.94 is his career average and not only 10 match average? With the same analogy how do we know that 23 feet is Ken's 4 jump average and not his career average?

Don't you think that B is ambiguous?


will go with B as the question stem says "fifth and final attempt". there is no talk about career average at all hence we cannot assume the same.

As for Sir Don Bradman example "Matter of fact, world knows that average 99.94 is his career average and not only 10 match average?"
my question is what if the person reading the question doesn't follow cricket and has no idea who Don Bradman is...that person will follow what is given in the question and I would believe GMAT will have no intention to assume that the person reading the question will have knowledge of everything

Whatever I have read, specially for GMAT RC, we should not use our own knowledge [even if one is an expert in that subject with which the passage deals with] on any subject while reading the passage and answer questions based on the facts provided in the passage...similarly we should use the same approach for these types of question

The experts can definitely provide more inputs on this
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Re: How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2013, 15:29
reply2spg wrote:
How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the state long jump finals?

(1) On his final jump, Ken exceeded the average length of his first four jumps by 2.5 feet.
(2) Ken’s final jump increased the length of his average (arithmetic mean) jump from 22.5 feet to 23 feet.

OA


Fifth and final, yeah might be ambigious.
Could be 5th and final (6th) no?

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How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2017, 17:29
1
The way I solve this.

S-1) Last Jump - (Avg 4 jumps) = 2.5. Not sufficient

S-2) We can infer that 22.5 is for 4 jumps and 23 for 5 jumps. So Last jump = 23*5-22.5*4. Sufficient.
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Re: How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2017, 20:43
Ambiguity... 5th and final...
Is final jump 5th or 6th?

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Re: How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2017, 03:58
B alone is sufficient to answer as we have old average as well as new average so the 5th and final jump can be calculated from these information such as
new average=old+s.d.(shared in each jump)
23=22+.5
so .5*5=2.5 now last jump would be 22.5+2.5=25 so sufficient
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Re: How far did Ken jump on his fifth and final attempt in the &nbs [#permalink] 03 Mar 2017, 03:58
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