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I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially

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I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially when it comes to adverbs and adjectives.
Could any one explain how to identify both modifiers ?
Here is an example with which i encounter problems :
In the traditional Japanese household, most clothing could be packed flatly, and so it
was not necessary to have elaborate closet facilities.

(A) flatly, and so it was not necessary to have elaborate closet facilities
(B) flat, and so elaborate closet facilities were unnecessary
(C) flatly, and so there was no necessity for elaborate closet facilities
(D) flat, there being no necessity for elaborate closet facilities
(E) flatly, as no elaborate closet facilities were necessary

What is "flatly" in this case ?
thx in advance !
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2011, 16:42
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I'm not an expert on noun and verb modifiers. I myself have chosen to not give importance to that topic because I never understood it in detail. Still, I"ll try to answer your question based on my understanding.

In this question, b is the right answer. Flat describes the noun clothing, hence is an adjective, implying that flatly is wrong. We can rule our A, C and E based on this rule. Between b and d, I chose b since it was structurally a better constructed sentence.

Now, coming to noun modifiers - my understanding: phrases that modufy nouns are called noun modiefiers. Adjectives are noun modifiers too.
Eg. 1.The grey cat crossed the road. Grey is the noun modifier here(also an adjective,incidentally)
2.The teacher who taught us Physics last year has invited us to join her Physics club. who taught us Physics is the noun modiefier here. Noun modifiers are placed close to the noun that they modify

Verb Modifiers - my understanding: modifies verbs and answers questions such as 'when', 'how', where' etc. Adverbs fall into this category.
Eg.Everyday, I buy a sandwich at this Deli. Here everyday is a verb modifier that modifies buy. Verb modifiers need not be places close to the verb that they modify

Hope that helps.

NOTE - Any SC expert out herE? Let me know if my understaning is correct in this case.

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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2011, 22:04
B says: n the traditional Japanese household, most clothing could be packed flat, and so elaborate closet facilities were unnecessary.
Can flat, an adjective which should modify the noun most clothing is a right option here. Isn't a Noun Modifier suppose to touch a Noun??

I am confused between noun modifier and verb modifier. :(
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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2011, 22:44
Adverbs can modify almost anything (verbs, adjectives or other adverbs) but not nouns and pronouns.

Adjectives modify nouns/pronouns.

And if you are totally stumped, pick adjective :) . This is just an empirical observation, which i have built based on the SC problems.

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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2011, 02:36
Crick,

Thanks for the explanation.
But i'm stuck between the option of using Flat or Flatly for this question. Lets consider using Flat is a better option as compared to Flatly but flat is not touching the noun most clothing here..
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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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Some words can be used as both adjectives and adverbs; flat is one among them. A few more are late, fast, hard, close deep etc. These do not need to be suffixed with the 'ly' tag to denote that they are adverbs.

The test is to find the answer for these question, - packed when, packed where, packed how and some such. If the word could answer any one of the questions, then it is an adverb, since adverbs denote time, manner, place etc.
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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2011, 04:58
daagh,

Thanks.. That serially solves the queries in head.. But raises another question..
I am sorry but have to ask this question..

So here the flat is adverb and acting as verb modifier or it is adjective and acting as noun modifier?
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Re: How to identify a noun or a verb modifier ? [#permalink]

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Flat in this context, is an adverb modifying the verb packed; make bold to choose B as the answer.
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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2016, 21:29
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 08:25
whichscore wrote:
I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially when it comes to adverbs and adjectives.
Could any one explain how to identify both modifiers ?
Here is an example with which i encounter problems :
In the traditional Japanese household, most clothing could be packed flatly, and so it
was not necessary to have elaborate closet facilities.

(A) flatly, and so it was not necessary to have elaborate closet facilities
(B) flat, and so elaborate closet facilities were unnecessary
(C) flatly, and so there was no necessity for elaborate closet facilities
(D) flat, there being no necessity for elaborate closet facilities
(E) flatly, as no elaborate closet facilities were necessary

What is "flatly" in this case ?
thx in advance !



Though answer is B , I am not sure if a comma can be used before " AND ".
AND joins two independent clauses , and I read somewhere that a comma should not come before an AND.
and anybody confirm or deny this rule with come certainty?
Thank you, appreciate your contribution.
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I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 08:27
https://gmatclub.com/forum/i-am-struggl ... l#p1889885
Hi,
Can you please have a look at this query of mine. Thank you.
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Last edited by stne on 17 Jul 2017, 11:18, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 09:23
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stne wrote:
Though answer is B , I am not sure if a comma can be used before " AND ".
AND joins two independent clauses , and I read somewhere that a comma should not come before an AND.
and anybody confirm or deny this rule with come certainty?
Thank you, appreciate your contribution.

I'm not sure where you saw that rule, but "and" is very, very frequently preceded with a comma -- both when "and" joins two independent clauses, and when "and" is part of a list of three or more items. Just flip through the official guide, and you'll find dozens of correct answers with "and" preceded by a comma.
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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 10:11
:arrow: :arrow: "flatly" is incorrect here because it is being used as an adverb. Flatly is modifying the verb - pack.

what we need here something that modifies the noun-clothing- and hence "flat" is appropriate. Options A, C and E are out.

Between B and D, option D is wordy- 'there being...".

Hence option B is short and conveys the message correctly that the clothing is packed "flat".

Correct answer is B. :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:

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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 10:38
GMATNinja wrote:
stne wrote:
Though answer is B , I am not sure if a comma can be used before " AND ".
AND joins two independent clauses , and I read somewhere that a comma should not come before an AND.
and anybody confirm or deny this rule with come certainty?
Thank you, appreciate your contribution.

I'm not sure where you saw that rule, but "and" is very, very frequently preceded with a comma -- both when "and" joins two independent clauses, and when "and" is part of a list of three or more items. Just flip through the official guide, and you'll find dozens of correct answers with "and" preceded by a comma.


Thank you, will get back to you , if I encounter something to the contrary.
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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 18:04
daagh wrote:
Some words can be used as both adjectives and adverbs; flat is one among them. A few more are late, fast, hard, close deep etc. These do not need to be suffixed with the 'ly' tag to denote that they are adverbs.

The test is to find the answer for these question, - packed when, packed where, packed how and some such. If the word could answer any one of the questions, then it is an adverb, since adverbs denote time, manner, place etc.



flatly and flat both can be used as adverbs but meaning is different.
Flatly means showing little interest or emotion. So it cant be used here.

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Re: I am struggling with noun and verb modifiers, especially   [#permalink] 28 Jul 2017, 18:04
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