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I. Whenever some of the runners are leading off and all of

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I. Whenever some of the runners are leading off and all of [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2004, 20:59
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A
B
C
D
E

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I. Whenever some of the runners are leading off and all of the infielders are playing in, all of the batters attempt to bunt
II. Some of the runners are leading off, but some of the batters are not attempting to bunt

Which of the following conclusions can be deduced from the two statements given?
A) some of the runners are not leading off
B) some of the batters are attempting to bunt
C) none of the infielders is playing in
D) all of the infielders are playing in
E) some of the infielders are not playing in
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New post 12 Jun 2004, 22:01
I was caught up between A and E. Any reason to refute A then?
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New post 12 Jun 2004, 22:08
This is what I think.

A & B = C
if not C then following are possible
1) not a
2) not b
3) not a and not b

I)
a = some runners are leading off
b = all infielders are playing in
c = all batters attempt to bunt

II)
a is true but c is not true

therefore b is not true.
not of ( all of the infielders are playing in ) = cannot say none are playing in for sure
but some are not playng in for sure.

some runners are leading off. It is possible that those who are leading off may be the only runners. In this case also the stem holds good. That is why I got rid of (A)

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New post 12 Jun 2004, 22:10
(A) expresses only a possibility. (E) apparently is definite from the given statement.

The pattern : some A and all of B = C

(A) speaks for the first part -- some A.
(E) speaks for the second part -- all of B. If only a part of B is true, then C is not true.

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Re: CR: Runners, infielders and batters [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 01:37
Some A and All B leads C
Some A and X leads to no C

We need to find X and hence it has to be related to infielders
Hence A, B out
C - Means "Some A and No B leads No C" may be correct but is extreme
D - Means "Some A and All B leads No C"
E - Means "Some A and some B (or not some B) leads No C"

D is wrong
Between C and E .... C is EXTREME

Hence E's my choice

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Re: CR: Runners, infielders and batters [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 03:53
Paul wrote:
I. Whenever some of the runners are leading off and all of the infielders are playing in, all of the batters attempt to bunt
II. Some of the runners are leading off, but some of the batters are not attempting to bunt

Which of the following conclusions can be deduced from the two statements given?
A) some of the runners are not leading off
B) some of the batters are attempting to bunt
C) none of the infielders is playing in
D) all of the infielders are playing in
E) some of the infielders are not playing in


To me it looks like a tough choice between C and E. I'll go with E and here's an attempt to explain.

I. SOME A leading off, ALL [color=red]B [/color]playing in = ALL C attepmting to bunt.
II. SOME A leading off = SOME C not attempting to bunt.

We need to deduce smth from both statements taken together.

A. - wrong, because we can deduce that from each statement taken separately. If some A ARE leading off, it means that some A are NOT leading off.

B. - wrong, because we can deduce that from statement II only. If some batters are NOT attempting to bunt, then some ARE attempting to bunt.

C. - wrong, because, like Srijay said, too EXTREME. If all B need to be playing in, for all C to attempt to bunt, then any lessening in the # of B playing in, would automatically lessen the # of B attempting to bunt. It doesn't have to be 'NO B playing in', therefore 'SOME C not attempting to bunt'. Although it could be valid as well.

D. - wrong, because "Whenever SOME of A are leading off, and ALL of B are playing in, then ALL of C are attempting to bunt". If D were true, then the result in statement II would equal the result of statement I (all batters attempting to bunt).

E. - is best.
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Re: CR: Runners, infielders and batters [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 03:57
SmashingGrace wrote:
Paul wrote:
I. Whenever some of the runners are leading off and all of the infielders are playing in, all of the batters attempt to bunt
II. Some of the runners are leading off, but some of the batters are not attempting to bunt

Which of the following conclusions can be deduced from the two statements given?
A) some of the runners are not leading off
B) some of the batters are attempting to bunt
C) none of the infielders is playing in
D) all of the infielders are playing in
E) some of the infielders are not playing in


To me it looks like a tough choice between C and E. I'll go with E and here's an attempt to explain.

I. SOME A leading off, ALL [color=red]B [/color]playing in = ALL C attepmting to bunt.
II. SOME A leading off = SOME C not attempting to bunt.

We need to deduce smth from both statements taken together.

A. - wrong, because we can deduce that from each statement taken separately. If some A ARE leading off, it means that some A are NOT leading off.

B. - wrong, because we can deduce that from statement II only. If some batters are NOT attempting to bunt, then some ARE attempting to bunt.

C. - wrong, because, like Srijay said, too EXTREME. If all B need to be playing in, for all C to attempt to bunt, then any lessening in the # of B playing in, would automatically lessen the # of B attempting to bunt. It doesn't have to be 'NO B playing in', therefore 'SOME C not attempting to bunt'. Although it could be valid as well.

D. - wrong, because "Whenever SOME of A are leading off, and ALL of B are playing in, then ALL of C are attempting to bunt". If D were true, then the result in statement II would equal the result of statement I (all batters attempting to bunt).

E. - is best.


Hi, Annie! Nice to see you! :-)

As I can see, you are really strong in Verbal...

Don't hesitate to explore your weak points in Math as well. Finally, the more weak point in your Quant you will find, the greater your score will be.

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 16:07
Wow! You guys have been doing some serious posting! Too bad I couldn't visit the board during the weekend :(

You can either intuit the answer or get it this way:

I. Some Runners Lead Off & All Infielders Play In -> All Batters Bunt
II. Some Runners Lead Off & X -> Some Batters Not Bunt

Some Batters Not Bunt => Not All Batters Bunt.

Therefore,

II. Some Runners Lead Off & X => Not All Batters Bunt (We negate the conclusion of Statement I!)

If we deny the conclusion, the only thing we can deduce is that Not All Infielders Play In => "some of the infielders are not playing in."

On the E bandwagon.

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 17:48
E is my final answer.

For all batter to bunt, all fielders should play. So if some batters bunt then probably not all fielders play.

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New post 13 Jun 2004, 19:13
Great to stir up those discussions. OA is E :)
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  [#permalink] 13 Jun 2004, 19:13
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