GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Nov 2019, 14:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 59182
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 May 2016, 14:42
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

61% (02:03) correct 39% (02:19) wrong based on 173 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

SVP
SVP
User avatar
V
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 2344
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 May 2016, 17:18
1
Bunuel wrote:
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

(A) –5
(B) 1
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 551



Hi Bunuel,

2x-y=11....y=2x-11

4x+y=4x+2x-11=6x-11

6x-11=-5...x=1
6x-11=1... x=2
6x-11=13...x=4
6x-11=17..X is not integer
6x-11=551..X is not integer

I think the choice E is 55 not 551. Otherwise both D & E CANNOT be solution.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Sep 2015
Posts: 73
Location: India
GMAT 1: 730 Q48 V42
GMAT 2: 750 Q50 V41
Reviews Badge
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 May 2016, 09:38
1
2x-y=11 & 4x+y=k.

On adding we get 6x=11+k

x = (11+k)/6

Insert each option and verify.

Both D and E do not satisfy the equation though. One should be removed ? Bunuel ?
_________________
Appreciate any KUDOS given ! :)
Board of Directors
User avatar
D
Status: QA & VA Forum Moderator
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 4835
Location: India
GPA: 3.5
WE: Business Development (Commercial Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 May 2016, 11:11
1
Bunuel wrote:
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

(A) –5
(B) 1
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 551


Will use a rather unusual way ( As I can not think algebraically , using X and Ys :-D )

Check the pattern -

Attachment:
Capture.PNG
Capture.PNG [ 2.83 KiB | Viewed 3425 times ]


Can you find something useful ? Yes you are correct the numbers are divisible by 6....

Given 2x–y= 11 and 4x+ y ( Results in the options ) must be a multiple of 6 , check out..

(A) –5

11-5 =6 (Multiple of 6)

(B) 1

11 + 1 = 12 (Multiple of 6)

(C) 13

11 + 13 = 24 (Multiple of 6)

(D) 17

11 + 17 = 28 (Not a Multiple of 6)

(E) 551

11 + 551 = 562 (Not a Multiple of 6)


I request Bunuel to kindly edit the post, either (D) or (E) must be changed...
_________________
Thanks and Regards

Abhishek....

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES FOR POSTING IN QA AND VA FORUM AND USE SEARCH FUNCTION BEFORE POSTING NEW QUESTIONS

How to use Search Function in GMAT Club | Rules for Posting in QA forum | Writing Mathematical Formulas |Rules for Posting in VA forum | Request Expert's Reply ( VA Forum Only )
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 59182
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2016, 01:42
Abhishek009 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

(A) –5
(B) 1
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 551


Will use a rather unusual way ( As I can not think algebraically , using X and Ys :-D )

Check the pattern -

Attachment:
Capture.PNG


Can you find something useful ? Yes you are correct the numbers are divisible by 6....

Given 2x–y= 11 and 4x+ y ( Results in the options ) must be a multiple of 6 , check out..

(A) –5

11-5 =6 (Multiple of 6)

(B) 1

11 + 1 = 12 (Multiple of 6)

(C) 13

11 + 13 = 24 (Multiple of 6)

(D) 17

11 + 17 = 28 (Not a Multiple of 6)

(E) 551

11 + 551 = 562 (Not a Multiple of 6)


I request Bunuel to kindly edit the post, either (D) or (E) must be changed...


Edited. Thank you everyone.
_________________
Current Student
User avatar
D
Joined: 12 Aug 2015
Posts: 2549
Schools: Boston U '20 (M)
GRE 1: Q169 V154
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2016, 01:49
Here is how i would solve it =>
2x-y=11
2x=11+y
4x=22+2y

now we need to check the value of 4x+4 => 22+2y+y=22+3y
hence 22+3y=value(in the options)
so y=value-22/3
so checking the options only D is unfit
Hence D
_________________
Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Mar 2018
Posts: 994
Location: India
Re: If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jan 2019, 10:12
Bunuel wrote:
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

(A) –5
(B) 1
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 55


If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11

2x - 11 = y

now just get the values for x and y, they are integers you can plug in

x-----y
1-----(-9)
2-----(-7)
3-----(-5)
4-----(-3)
5-----(-1)

Now just substitute them back and get the value which is not possible

16 - 3 = 13
20 - 1 = 19

D doesn't exist.
_________________
If you notice any discrepancy in my reasoning, please let me know. Lets improve together.

Quote which i can relate to.
Many of life's failures happen with people who do not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.
VP
VP
User avatar
D
Joined: 31 Oct 2013
Posts: 1472
Concentration: Accounting, Finance
GPA: 3.68
WE: Analyst (Accounting)
CAT Tests
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jan 2019, 13:53
Bunuel wrote:
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

(A) –5
(B) 1
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 55


Given,

2x - y = 11

2x -11 =y

we are looking for the value of 4x + y.

4x + y

4x + 2x -11

6x -11 = ?

*** Trail and error method is suitable now.

6*1 - 11 = -5
6*2 -11 =1
6*3 -11 =7
6*4 -11 =13
6*5 -11 = 19
6*6 - 11 = 25

look at the answer pattern........Value is increasing .

17 is not in the list and no chance to get this integer.

6*11 -11 =55

D is the correct answer.
GMAT Club Bot
If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be   [#permalink] 29 Jan 2019, 13:53
Display posts from previous: Sort by

If x and y are integers and 2x–y= 11, then 4x+ y CANNOT be

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne