It is currently 12 Dec 2017, 05:29

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

If you only knew then what you know now... Fave GMAT Tips

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 57

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 19

Location: United States
Concentration: Marketing, Strategy
Re: If you only knew then what you know now... Fave GMAT Tips [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Feb 2013, 15:08
thegmatguru wrote:
MisterEko wrote:
The simplest trick of them all is to read the stem, and then immediately start looking at the easier of two pieces of information, for example, if you get these two options:

1) x+y-6+2xy= 23

and

2) x=6

I used to go to 1) and analyze it. Now, I just pick the easier one to start, which in this case would be statement 2). When you are able to easily eliminate 1 of the statements, it gives you a decent confidence boost because you narrowed your choices down by 40-60%.


What is more interesting about the example above and something that most prep companies don't tell you is that IF YOU CORRECTLY GET ONLY ONE SOLUTION TO ONE OF THE STATEMENTS, THAT SOLUTION WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE A SOLUTION TO THE OTHER STATEMENT.

For example:

What is the value of x?

1) x is a prime factor of 221
2) 2x = 34

Clearly, the second statement is easier to evaluate (sufficient..only answer is 17)

If you know this, the first statement is much easier to evaluate because you KNOW that x=17 is a solution and you can immediately divide 221 by 17 to see what other factors it may have. (17*13 = 221)

Note that knowing the answer to one statement does not tell you how many solutions the other has, so it won't tell you directly "insufficient" or "sufficient", but it gives you at least one solution to start with.


Hi GMAT Guru, what is the answer for this SC question? Thanks
_________________

MV
"Better to fight for something than live for nothing.” ― George S. Patton Jr

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 19

e-GMAT Discount CodesKaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesOptimus Prep Discount Codes
Re: If you only knew then what you know now... Fave GMAT Tips   [#permalink] 28 Feb 2013, 15:08

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 21 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

If you only knew then what you know now... Fave GMAT Tips

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderator: HKD1710

HOT DEALS FOR NOVEMBER
Economist GMAT - Free Free 1-week trial + Free Test
Kaplan Courses - Save $475 $225 Discount + $250 Bonus
Target Test Prep - $800 $50 Discount + $750 Bonus [GMAT Club
Tests and Premium MBA Bundle]
EMPOWERgmat - $99/mo GMAT Club tests included 2nd month
GMAT Club Tests - Free Included with every course purchase
of $149 or more - Full List is here


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.