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In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students

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In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 May 2018, 12:39
4
8
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A
B
C
D
E

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  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

43% (00:59) correct 57% (01:02) wrong based on 265 sessions

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In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students who were not proficient in English in the USA, almost twice as many as 1990.


A) almost twice as many as
B) almost twice as many as in
C) almost twice as many as there were in
D) nearly twice as many as in
E) about twice as many as there were in

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Originally posted by prasadyanz on 24 Mar 2016, 08:28.
Last edited by generis on 26 May 2018, 12:39, edited 2 times in total.
Formatted the question
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 08:50
2
My ans option C...

Only C and E maintain the parallel structure:

In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students who were not proficient in English in the USA, almost twice as many as there were in 1990

Almost twice is better than about twice..
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2016, 09:32
I choose B .. it is wrong for || structure ...
Can someone give an example where B would be correct ??
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2016, 09:48
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nikhiljd wrote:
I choose B .. it is wrong for || structure ...
Can someone give an example where B would be correct ??


In a comparison between two elements, the repeated parts in the second element may be omitted as long as the meaning is clear..

Therefore I do not see any problem with B.

Following is an example of a correct answer from OG13:

In no other historical sighting did Halley’s Comet cause such a worldwide sensation as in its return of 1910–1911.

The complete repeated portion from the second element of the comparison has been omitted except for the prepositional clause in in its return of 1910–1911.

In no other historical sighting and in its return of 1910–1911 are compared in this offcial example.

Similarly for the subject question In 1998 and in 1990 can be compared without repeating the part there were.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2016, 02:20
sayantanc2k wrote:
nikhiljd wrote:
I choose B .. it is wrong for || structure ...
Can someone give an example where B would be correct ??


In a comparison between two elements, the repeated parts in the second element may be omitted as long as the meaning is clear..

Therefore I do not see any problem with B.

Following is an example of a correct answer from OG13:

In no other historical sighting did Halley’s Comet cause such a worldwide sensation as in its return of 1910–1911.

The complete repeated portion from the second element of the comparison has been omitted except for the prepositional clause in in its return of 1910–1911.

In no other historical sighting and in its return of 1910–1911 are compared in this offcial example.

Similarly for the subject question In 1998 and in 1990 can be compared without repeating the part there were.



Sayantan-I agree with you-B should be the answer-also, could you please comment on Economist questions-I see a lot of qs from here are not a good quality and controversial-do you recommend using them and did you use them?
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2016, 00:43
KS15 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
nikhiljd wrote:
I choose B .. it is wrong for || structure ...
Can someone give an example where B would be correct ??


In a comparison between two elements, the repeated parts in the second element may be omitted as long as the meaning is clear..

Therefore I do not see any problem with B.

Following is an example of a correct answer from OG13:

In no other historical sighting did Halley’s Comet cause such a worldwide sensation as in its return of 1910–1911.

The complete repeated portion from the second element of the comparison has been omitted except for the prepositional clause in in its return of 1910–1911.

In no other historical sighting and in its return of 1910–1911 are compared in this offcial example.

Similarly for the subject question In 1998 and in 1990 can be compared without repeating the part there were.



Sayantan-I agree with you-B should be the answer-also, could you please comment on Economist questions-I see a lot of qs from here are not a good quality and controversial-do you recommend using them and did you use them?


Sorry KS15 I have not gone through the material and hence cannot comment on the same.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2016, 08:34
Experts from Economist are on GMATClub.

Hope they see this thread and explain why B is not mentioned as the right answer.
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In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2016, 06:24
Soaring television costs accounted for more than half the spending in the presidential campaign of 1992, a greater proportion than in any previous election.

In 1979 lack of rain reduced India’s rice production to about 41 million tons, nearly 25 percent less than the 1978 harvest.

Lake Baikal holds 20 percent of the world's fresh water, more than all the North American Great Lakes combined.

Only seven people this century have been killed by the great white shark, fewer than have been killed by bee stings.

Companies in the United States are providing job training and general education for nearly eight million people, as many as are enrolled in the nation’s four-year colleges and universities.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2016, 10:46
+1 B for me too.
Nothing wrong with it.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 11:39
prasadyanz wrote:
In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students who were not proficient in English in the USA, almost twice as many as 1990.


A) almost twice as many as
B) almost twice as many as in
C) almost twice as many as there were in
D) nearly twice as many as in
E) about twice as many as there were in

The official answer, explained, is C

Economist GMAT Tutor, HERE distinguishes Option B from Option C.
OFFICIAL ANSWER

OPTION B) almost twice as many as in

Incorrect.

While the comparison in this answer choice is logical,
this answer choice is stylistically flawed as there is no unconjugated verb
in the second half of the comparison (i.e., after the second as).

While it is true that stylistic mistakes are not always corrected,
in this case there is a grammatically correct and logical answer choice
that corrects this mistake and includes such a verb. Look for it!

OPTION C) almost twice as many as there were in

Correct.

This answer logically compares the number of certain students in 1998
with the number of these students in 1990.
This comparison also meets the stylistic preference for including
a conjugated verb in the second half of the Comparative structure (i.e., after the second as).

ANSWER C

Hope that helps.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 12:19
Hi generis

What about difference between C & E- Almost/About Split?

generis wrote:
prasadyanz wrote:
In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students who were not proficient in English in the USA, almost twice as many as 1990.


A) almost twice as many as
B) almost twice as many as in
C) almost twice as many as there were in
D) nearly twice as many as in
E) about twice as many as there were in

The official answer, explained, is C

This question turns on stylistic subtlety: if one answer is
100% clear, and another answer is close but possibly unclear,
choose the clear answer.
In this case, the absence of "there were" in B compared to
the presence of "there were" in C decides in favor of C.


Economist GMAT Tutor, HERE distinguishes Option B from Option C.
OFFICIAL ANSWER

OPTION B) almost twice as many as in

Incorrect.

While the comparison in this answer choice is logical,
this answer choice is stylistically flawed as there is no unconjugated verb
in the second half of the comparison (i.e., after the second as).

While it is true that stylistic mistakes are not always corrected,
in this case there is a grammatically correct and logical answer choice
that corrects this mistake and includes such a verb. Look for it!

OPTION C) almost twice as many as there were in

Correct.

This answer logically compares the number of certain students in 1998
with the number of these students in 1990.
This comparison also meets the stylistic preference for including
a conjugated verb in the second half of the Comparative structure (i.e., after the second as).

ANSWER C

Hope that helps.

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In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 13:56
4
generis wrote:
prasadyanz wrote:
In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students who were not proficient in English in the USA, almost twice as many as 1990.
A) almost twice as many as
B) almost twice as many as in
C) almost twice as many as there were in
D) nearly twice as many as in
E) about twice as many as there were in


gmatbusters wrote:
Hi generis

What about difference between C & E- Almost/About Split?

gmatbusters - This distinction is SUBTLE. Good catch.
The words do not have the same meaning.

Almost means "very nearly" or "not quite" [not enough to be equal, but very close]

About means "approximately" or "roughly"

"Almost" means slightly fewer or just a little less than.
"Almost" cannot equal more.
"About" can equal more.

Almost: ONLY fewer than. NOT more than.

About can mean more AND/OR fewer than.

In this question, "about" would change the meaning
from "fewer than 6.4 million (proficient students) but close to that number"
to
"some number a little higher or a little lower than 6.4 million."

The number of proficient students is NOT more than two times 3.2 million.

That distinction might seem to be without any meaningful difference.

Reason through the number of proficient students that each word makes possible.

ABOUT twice as many as 3.2 million
• could mean MORE than twice as many: 6.5 million, OR
• could mean FEWER than twice as many: 6.3 million

ALMOST twice as many as 3.2 million
• could mean ONLY FEWER than 6.4 million
• could NOT mean more than twice as many -- could NOT mean 6.5 million

"About," in short, changes the meaning of the sentence because more or fewer does not mean fewer.

Uncountable
"Almost" and "about" function the same way for both countable and uncountable nouns. "money" is not countable (one money, two moneys) :(

Natasha has some money.

Amelia has almost as much money as Natasha, N.

Amelia has nearly as much money as N. BUT
--Amelia does not have exactly as much money as N, and
--Amelia does not have more money than N
--Amelia has less money than N

Amelia has about as much money as Natasha.
-- Amelia has slightly more or slightly less money than N

Almost - SLIGHTLY
Finally, the "slightly" part of almost is important.

almost = slightly fewer (or less) than.

#1) If I have 20 coins and you have 10 coins, you do not have "almost" (nearly) as many coins as I have.

#2) If I have 20 coins and you have 18 coins, you DO have "almost as many coins" as I have.

#3) If I have 20 coins and you have 22 coins, we cannot say that you have almost as many coins as I have.
You do not have "almost as many."
You have MORE coins.
"Almost" does not = more.

We CAN say in scenarios #2 and #3, however, that you have ABOUT as many coins as I have.

Hope that helps. :-)
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2019, 02:32
C and E are clearly the two most likely options, as they are the ones that maintain //ism.

E is very verbose, so I am sure that C is the correct answer.
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Re: In 1998, there were 3.2 million public school students   [#permalink] 28 Feb 2019, 02:32
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