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In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children

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In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2018, 12:11
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Question Stats:

64% (01:16) correct 36% (01:19) wrong based on 343 sessions

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In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children in the United States was diagnosed with autism. In 2014, that figure was one out of every 68 eight-year-old children. It can thus be concluded that the per-capita incidence of autism among eight-year-olds more than doubled between 2000 and 2014.

Which of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014.
B) Eight-year-old children were the only group of children diagnosed for autism between 2000 and 2014.
C) The most effective age at which to test children for the incidence of autism is the age of eight.
D) There were no important changes in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014.
E) Autism is not the only condition for which per-capita diagnoses increased substantially between 2000 and 2014.

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In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2018, 13:11
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sahilvijay wrote:
In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children in the United States was diagnosed with autism. In 2014, that figure was one out of every 68 eight-year-old children. It can thus be concluded that the per-capita incidence of autism among eight-year-olds more than doubled between 2000 and 2014.

Which of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014.
B) Eight-year-old children were the only group of children diagnosed for autism between 2000 and 2014.
C) The most effective age at which to test children for the incidence of autism is the age of eight.
D) There were no important changes in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014.
E) Autism is not the only condition for which per-capita diagnoses increased substantially between 2000 and 2014.


This argument talks about the number of eight-year-old children in the United States
diagnosed with autism. This number has reduced from 1 in 150 in the year 2000 to 1
in 68 in the year 2014. The conclusion was that the per-capita incidence of autism had
more than doubled.

An assumption for this argument to stand is Option D(There were no important changes
in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014)

If we were to negate this statement, the conclusion will break as we will be provided
with an alternative reasoning for the fall in the number.
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Re: In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2018, 19:08
pushpitkc wrote:
sahilvijay wrote:
In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children in the United States was diagnosed with autism. In 2014, that figure was one out of every 68 eight-year-old children. It can thus be concluded that the per-capita incidence of autism among eight-year-olds more than doubled between 2000 and 2014.

Which of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014.
B) Eight-year-old children were the only group of children diagnosed for autism between 2000 and 2014.
C) The most effective age at which to test children for the incidence of autism is the age of eight.
D) There were no important changes in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014.
E) Autism is not the only condition for which per-capita diagnoses increased substantially between 2000 and 2014.


This argument talks about the number of eight-year-old children in the United States
diagnosed with autism. This number has reduced from 1 in 150 in the year 2000 to 1
in 68 in the year 2014. The conclusion was that the per-capita incidence of autism had
more than doubled.

An assumption for this argument to stand is Option D(There were no important changes
in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014)

If we were to negate this statement, the conclusion will break as we will be provided
with an alternative reasoning for the fall in the number.


Hi

Can you please delve deeper and explain why option A is incorrect .

Warm Regards,
Arvind
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In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2018, 20:01
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arvind910619 wrote:
pushpitkc wrote:
sahilvijay wrote:
In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children in the United States was diagnosed with autism. In 2014, that figure was one out of every 68 eight-year-old children. It can thus be concluded that the per-capita incidence of autism among eight-year-olds more than doubled between 2000 and 2014.

Which of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014.
B) Eight-year-old children were the only group of children diagnosed for autism between 2000 and 2014.
C) The most effective age at which to test children for the incidence of autism is the age of eight.
D) There were no important changes in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014.
E) Autism is not the only condition for which per-capita diagnoses increased substantially between 2000 and 2014.


This argument talks about the number of eight-year-old children in the United States
diagnosed with autism. This number has reduced from 1 in 150 in the year 2000 to 1
in 68 in the year 2014. The conclusion was that the per-capita incidence of autism had
more than doubled.

An assumption for this argument to stand is Option D(There were no important changes
in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014)

If we were to negate this statement, the conclusion will break as we will be provided
with an alternative reasoning for the fall in the number.


Hi

Can you please delve deeper and explain why option A is incorrect .

Warm Regards,
Arvind




I think the reason for A to be incorrect => per-capita is already mentioned in argument.



Also lets try negation of A

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014.


1/150 in 2000, lets say population is 1500 => 10 cases => PER capita 1/150 remains same
1/68 in 2014 , lets say population is 1360 => 20 cases => per capita 1/68 remains same

when negated => number of 8 year old considerably smaller in 2000 than in 2014
1/150 in 2000, lets say population is 1500 => 10 cases => per capita remains same 10/1500 = 1/150 again same per capta
1/68 in 2014 , population = 68000 => total 1000 cases => 1000/68000 => 1/68 same per capita


I hope it helps
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Re: In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2018, 20:36
Choice A is wrong, because the argument already talks about per capita incidences of autism and thus the absolute population figures do not matter as they are already accounted for.
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Re: In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2018, 10:35
In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children in the United States was diagnosed with autism. In 2014, that figure was one out of every 68 eight-year-old children. It can thus be concluded that the per-capita incidence of autism among eight-year-olds more than doubled between 2000 and 2014.

Which of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

A) The number of eight-year-old children in the United States was not substantially smaller for the year 2000 than it was for the year 2014. --Number of children doesn't impact the figures.
B) Eight-year-old children were the only group of children diagnosed for autism between 2000 and 2014. --We are concerned about eight year old group only
C) The most effective age at which to test children for the incidence of autism is the age of eight. --most effective?
D) There were no important changes in the criteria for diagnosing autism in eight-year-olds between 2000 and 2014. --Correct
E) Autism is not the only condition for which per-capita diagnoses increased substantially between 2000 and 2014. --other conditions are out of scope
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Re: In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2018, 09:17
let's first dissect the argument :
we are talking here about ratios ,
for 2000 : 1 / 150 diagnosed with autism
for 2014 : 1 / 68 diagnosed with autism
taking the LCM ====> approximately 1/150 against 2/150
in choice A we are talking about total numbers , however the argument is addressing some percentages , it's not an apple to apple comparison , that's why A is ruled out
as for option D
If there were important changes in the criteria, then comparing diagnosis rates is an apples-to-oranges comparison - you cannot rely simply on diagnosis rates to accurately determine whether more or fewer eight-year-olds, per capita, had the condition in either time period.
Re: In 2000, approximately one out of every 150 eight-year-old children &nbs [#permalink] 13 Sep 2018, 09:17
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