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In a political system with only two major parties, the

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In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2010, 20:08
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In a political system with only two major parties, the entrance of a third-party radical candidate into an election race has historically damaged the chances of one of the two major candidates. This notion played out in the presidential race of 2000. In this important election the third-party extremist candidate attracted some of the voters who otherwise would have voted for one of the two major candidates, but not voters who supported the other candidate. Because the third-party candidate affected the two major candidates unequally, for reasons neither of them has any control over, the practice of allowing a third-party presidential candidate was unfair and should not be allowed in future national elections.

If the factual information in the above passage is true, which of the following can be most reliably inferred?

If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.

If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.

A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the major parties.

The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.

The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.
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Re: political system  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2010, 23:18
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Using the info here :
"In this important election the third-party extremist candidate attracted some of the voters who otherwise would have voted for one of the two major candidates, but not voters who supported the other candidate."

Choice A - If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote. - CORRECT
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 06:44
That was tricky. But I did get B by POE. Here's how.

(A) If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.
The question mentions that the 3rd party will get its votes from only one of the two parties.

(B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.
This remains. So B.

(C) A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the two major parties.
Words such as 'will not' or 'never voted' seem too strong. Eliminate.
(D) The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.
Political stance? Not important. Eliminate

(E) The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.
Who cares about founders? OOS.
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 08:17
Very clear explanation hanumayamma...Went for C too, as per your reasoning...
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 10:18
Also went with B. Tough question B was the only answer that I felt made any sense.
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 19:15
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+ 1 for B
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 19:51
I picked B as well. If before the third party came into the picture, the split was 50-50, then after the 3rd party came in, none of the parties will have more than 50%.
Very bad way of putting things but hey, this is CR for you!
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jun 2011, 18:57
Inference on the GMAT is something that is absolutely and always true...

Choice B!
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2012, 22:10
Official Answer please

Thanks
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2012, 05:11
Very good question.... KUDOS from me
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2012, 05:44
This is a fun math-based problem.

Correct answer is option B.

Let's assume the two major parties each have 50 votes out of a total 100 votes. And we know that a third party will take some of the 50 votes of ONLY ONE of the parties leaving the votes of the other party intact. Thus, no party would (still) have more than 50% of the votes or more than 50 votes.

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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2012, 05:46
B is the answer.

Though I arrived at the answer through POE because none of them seemed fitting as per the facts given.

bsdlover nicely explained the answer though!
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2012, 05:57
I don't think this should be categorized as debatable OA. The answer is a clearcut B. A is close but upon close inspection, B comes out on top. This is a must be true question type.
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2012, 19:05
buffdaddy wrote:
I go for B, since if before the 3rd party comes into the picture, there was a 50-50 split, the third party will only get voters from only one pool. So the 50-50 split will turn into a 50-(50-X)-X split. So B, and only B can be correctly inferred


Okay, so say there are 100 voters originally, 50-50 for party A and B. Party C is introduced and 10 voters from Party B vote for Party C instead. Meanwhile party A still captures a half of the vote?!

Thus, I don't understand how C is correct?
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2012, 20:10
In a political system with only two major parties, the entrance of a third-party candidate into an election race damages the chances of only one of the two major candidates. The third-party candidate always attracts some of the voters who might otherwise have voted for one of the two major candidates, but not voters who support the other candidate. Since a third-party candidacy affects the two major candidates unequally, for reasons neither of them has any control over, the practice is unfair and should not be allowed.

If the factual information in the passage above is true, which of the following can be most reliably inferred from it?

(A) If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.

- Wrong because the author states that the third party affects the other two candidates unequally

(B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.

- Not sure at first... 'The third-party candidate always attracts some of the voters who might otherwise have voted for one of the two major candidates'

Then, some usually means about 30% or less than a half. Therefore, this fits into the premise.

(C) A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the two major parties.

Out of scope

(D) The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.

Out of scope

(E) The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.

Out of scope
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2013, 17:17
Answer: B

The conclusion that can be inferred here is that the entrance of a third party will affect both voters unequally.


If the factual information in the passage above is true, which of the following can be most reliably inferred from it?

(A) If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.
There is no reference in the passage regarding the position a party takes and how it affects other parties' voters. -- incorrect
(B) If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.
Correct - According to the passage, the new third party would take some votes at least, and will also bring in its own voters, hence the new tally won't allow any one party to have more the 1/2 of the votes.
(C) A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the two major parties.
This is ambiguous - as we know the new party will bring its own voters - those could be voters who have not voted for anyone else before. -- incorrect
(D) The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.
Similar to A, no opinions or stance of a party is known -- incorrect
(E) The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.
No information in the passage suggests a coalition of other party leaders -- incorrect.
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2013, 21:41
In an inference question you are looking for the thing you know to be true from the paragraph ALONE. You are not looking to add extra information or change the author's opinion in any way. a good start to these question types is to elminate answer choices that bring in new information that is not contained in the passage. In this question:

A is out becuase it directly contradicts the passage - saying the third party will pull voters equally while the passage says a third party will only pull voters from one side.
C is out becuase the passage does not discuss new voters so we can't know that for sure.
D is out becuase we don't know the nature of the political stance of a new party
E is out becuase we don't know how a third party would be founded.

This leaves B which must be true because the passage says a third party would only pull voters from one party - thus if each party started with 50% then a third party would pull some votes from one side, leaving the other side untouched. Therefore, it is unlikely one party will get more than 50%. Also notice the "mushy" wording in the word "likely" this makes it easier to prove true over an answer that says something will happen.
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Re: CR - Political Parties  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2013, 23:11
Yikes!!

we all fell into the same trap & chose C




buffdaddy wrote:
sebycb976 wrote:
In a political system with only two major parties, the entrance of a third-party candidate into an election race damages the chances of only one of the two major candidates. The third-party candidate always attracts some of the voters who might otherwise have voted for one of the two major candidates, but not voters who support the other candidate. Since a third-party candidacy affects the two major candidates unequally, for reasons neither of them has any control over, the practice is unfair and should not be allowed.
If the factual information in the passage above is true, which of the following can be most reliably inferred from it?

A. If the political platform of the third party is a compromise position between that of the two major parties, the third party will draw its voters equally from the two major parties.
B. If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equally between the two major parties, neither of the major parties is likely to capture much more than one-half of the vote.
C. A third-party candidate will not capture the votes of new voters who have never voted for candidates of either of the two major parties.
D. The political stance of a third party will be more radical than that of either of the two major parties.
E. The founders of a third party are likely to be a coalition consisting of former leaders of the two major parties.

Explain your choice please.


I go for B, since if before the 3rd party comes into the picture, there was a 50-50 split, the third party will only get voters from only one pool. So the 50-50 split will turn into a 50-(50-X)-X split. So B, and only B can be correctly inferred
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2015, 18:53
I thought B so clearly defeats all other options here with a very straightforward logic. No PoE reqd.

According to the passage:
Party X and Party Y exist.
Party Z comes in and takes away votes from X and Y unequally.
Conclusion: Therefore, this practice (of a third party entering) is unfair.

What must be true?

Option B:
If, before the emergence of a third party, voters were divided equallybetween the two major parties i.e.
X has 50%
Y has 50%
(Game over! Even before Z enters, choice B holds true. Neither X nor Y will get more than 50% :) )
Entrance of C will further reduce either X's or Y's votes, which can never be >50%. Hence B has to be true alwayz.

I did not even bothered reading rest of the choices, hope i was not tricked here.. :|
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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2016, 11:37
The question's OA is B

Added to the 1st post. :)

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Re: In a political system with only two major parties, the &nbs [#permalink] 22 Jun 2016, 11:37

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