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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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In an effort to reduce the number of fires started by [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 10:31
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Ssingh1807 wrote:
Hi Mike
I have heard and read that "comma + which" is the correct modifier usage. Then why in the correct OA, "in which" used in the beginning of the highlighted portion is correct.
Thanks in advance..

SS

Dear Ssingh1807,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am going to chide you. Your question is very much characteristic of someone who has been diligent learning rules but who has done far too little reading. Learning lists of rules will not get you anywhere close to GMAT SC mastery. To learn and understand at a deep level, you need to develop a habit of reading. I recommend this blog:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

I'll briefly discuss this particular rule. If the pronoun "which" is the subject of the subordinate clause, as it often is, then most typically it would immediately follow the target noun modified by the clause. In this case, there is always a comma.
Christiaan Huygens was the first to identify the rings of Saturn, which confused Galileo, who had a less powerful telescope.
Nevertheless, sometimes in more sophisticated writing, the pronoun "which" is object of a preposition within the subordinate clause. In this case, the structure is
[target noun][preposition]"which"[subordinate clause]
I just read the book for which the professor wrote the introduction.
This is not a task of which I am capable.

There is no comma in this construction. Once again, this is a feature of particularly sophisticated and well-spoken language. Most of the American population does not speak in this way. The GMAT, though, represents a very high bar, so these forms are typical of what you could see on the GMAT SC.

I also will recommend these two blogs:
That vs. Which on the GMAT
GMAT Grammar: Vital Noun Modifiers

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Re: In an effort to reduce the number of fires started by [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 19:15
Thanks mike.. i don't mind your chiding; it only helps..:)

SS

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Re: In an effort to reduce the number of fires started by   [#permalink] 15 Aug 2017, 19:15

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