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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made

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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2016, 20:22
email2vm wrote:
nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins



Experts,

Need your help here to understand why C is not the contender. My reasoning is as below:

Since each child was asked to pick all the rolling pins but he chose to pick only one he has used. Which means that he is searching for all the pins which looks similar to the one he has used and hence he was searching for the same general shape. And it must be true that child is not aware that rolling pins are distinct. But he couldn't find any other than the one he used. hence C.

what's the flaw in this reasoning?

looking for answers.

oa is C it seems that few of u got the right answer though I myself chose B :shock: :shock:
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2017, 09:55
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.

Type - inference

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin - From the text, it seems possible that the children did understand the function of a rolling pin; certainly, they were able to identify the rolling pin they used.
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object - Correct - The answer must be true because we know that despite being asked to identify all the rolling pins, each child selected only the rolling pin he had used. No two children picked the same rolling pin and therefore no two children understood the name “rolling pin” to
apply to the same object.
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape - Incorrect - If this was true , then children would have chosen other rolling pins too
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used - ISWAT - a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about whether the children could identify those utensils.
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins - Incorrect - 180 answer

Answer B
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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 00:48
OE : Courtesy some expert :
Answer (B). The “rolling pin” problem above is a famous question that lures
many people to incorrectly select answer choice (D), a Shell Game answer.
Answer choice (D) looks perfect at first glance, but the author never indicated
that the children could identify only the utensils that they used. Rolling pins,
yes; utensils, no. The correct answer choice is (B), which many test takers
quickly pass over. Let’s examine each answer: Answer choice (A): From the
text, it seems possible that the children did understand the function of a
rolling pin; certainly, they were able to identify the rolling pin they used.
Answer choice (B): This is the correct answer choice. The answer must be
true because we know that despite being asked to identify all the rolling pins,
each child selected only the rolling pin he had used. No two children picked
the same rolling pin and therefore no two children understood the name
“rolling pin” to apply to the same object. Answer choice (C): Apparently not,
otherwise logic would say the children would pick other rolling pins aside from
the one they used. Answer choice (D): Do not be concerned if you fell into
this trap, but consider it a lesson for the future. The test makers smoothly slip
“utensils” into the answer choice, and most students make the mistake of
equating utensils with rolling pins. Yes, a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are
other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about
whether the children could identify those utensils. This is the essence of the
Shell Game: you expect one thing and the test makers slip something quite
similar but essentially different into its place. Answer choice (E): This is an
Opposite Answer. As indicated by the final sentence of the stimulus, the
children were able to distinguish the rolling pin they used from the other
rolling pins. This circumstance is exactly opposite of that stated in answer
choice (E), which declares, “The children were not able to distinguish...” In
this case, if you miss the “not,” this answer choice is very attractive.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2018, 11:53
I chose D without giving any suspicion of what can be wrong with D.
D is a good trap. "identify correctly only the utensils that he had used" -> the word "only" is extreme -> ones cannot conclude what are only things that those children can identify.
On the other hand, B is a sure answer.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2018, 09:49
I selected answer C but that’s the wrong answer. The answers dwells upon the last sentence “each child picked only the one that he had used” that means that these children knew and understood what a rolling pin is and the one that they had already used.
A and E are simply out because of the reasons stated above.
C is out because it talks about the general shape and it may be true but not 100%. Eliminate.
D tries to play with words, instead of rolling pin it says utensils.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2018, 19:07
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
Totally reverse...Infact they were able to grasp the function

(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object

Because the children clearly distinguished one Rolling Pin from another.For every child, there was only one RP in the group of RP's and utensils. In his mind, there is only one RP and he picked that one.

(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape

They did not understood that at all

(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used - They were able to identify the rolling pins also correctly which they used

(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins- Reverse statement, Infact they were able to distinguish
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made   [#permalink] 26 Mar 2018, 19:07

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