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In her account of unmarried women s experiences in colonial

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In her account of unmarried women s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2012, 03:00
In her account of unmarried women’s experiences in
colonial Philadelphia, Wulf argues that educated young
women, particularly Quakers, engaged in resistance to
patriarchal marriage by exchanging poetry critical of
marriage, copying verse into their commonplace
books. Wulf suggests that this critique circulated
beyond the daughters of the Quaker elite and middle
class, whose commonplace books she mines,
proposing that Quaker schools brought it to many poor
female students of diverse backgrounds.
Here Wulf probably overstates Quaker schools’ impact.
At least three years’ study would be necessary to
achieve the literacy competence necessary to grapple
with the material she analyzes. In 1765, the year Wulf
uses to demonstrate the diversity of Philadelphia’s
Quaker schools, 128 students enrolled in these
schools. Refining Wulf’s numbers by the information
she provides on religious affiliation, gender, and length
of study, it appears that only about 17 poor nonQuaker

girls were educated in Philadelphia’s Quaker
schools for three years or longer. While Wulf is correct
that a critique of patriarchal marriage circulated
broadly, Quaker schools probably cannot be credited
with instilling these ideas in the lower classes. Popular
literary satires on marriage had already landed on
fertile ground in a multiethnic population that
embodied a wide range of marital beliefs and
practices. These ethnic- and class-based traditions
themselves challenged the legitimacy of patriarchal
marriage.


According to the passage, which of the following was true of attitudes toward marriage in colonial Philadelphia?
A. Exemplars of a critique of marriage could be found in various literary forms, but they did not impact public attitudes except among educated young women.
B. The diversity of the student body in the Quaker schools meant that attitudes toward marriage were more disparate there than elsewhere in Philadelphia
society.
C. Although critical attitudes toward marriage were widespread, Quaker schools’ influence in disseminating these attitudes was limited.
D. Criticisms of marriage in colonial Philadelphia were directed at only certain limited aspects of patriarchal marriage.
E. The influence of the wide range of marital beliefs and practices present in Philadelphia’s multiethnic population can be detected in the poetry that
educated young women copied in their commonplace books.

I marked
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A
, and I know it is wrong but how can anyone explain
[Reveal] Spoiler:
C
?


The author of the passage implies which of the following about the poetry mentioned in the first paragraph?
A. Wulf exaggerates the degree to which young women from an elite background regarded the poetry as providing a critique of marriage.
B. The circulation of the poetry was confined to young Quaker women.
C. Young women copied the poetry into their commonplace books because they interpreted it as providing a desirable model of unmarried life.
D. The poetry’s capacity to influence popular attitudes was restricted by the degree of literacy necessary to comprehend it.
E. The poetry celebrated marital beliefs and practices that were in opposition to patriarchal marriage.

I again marked
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A
, and the OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D
.

Please explain the above two questions.

Help appreciated.
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New post 30 Sep 2012, 08:07
Ankit

Source of this passage please..........

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Re: In her account of unmarried women’s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2012, 08:29
My 2 cents.

In the first question - (A) says " Exemplars of a critique of marriage could be found in various literary forms" which I feel is not true as per the message. There is no discussion of other literary forms except the poetry, so there are no other literary forms discussed.

Forgot to add, I got it wrong myself then only realized the above difference.
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Last edited by methevoid on 30 Sep 2012, 08:41, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: In her account of unmarried women’s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2012, 08:41
ankit0411 wrote:

The author of the passage implies which of the following about the poetry mentioned in the first paragraph?
A. Wulf exaggerates the degree to which young women from an elite background regarded the poetry as providing a critique of marriage.
B. The circulation of the poetry was confined to young Quaker women.
C. Young women copied the poetry into their commonplace books because they interpreted it as providing a desirable model of unmarried life.
D. The poetry’s capacity to influence popular attitudes was restricted by the degree of literacy necessary to comprehend it.
E. The poetry celebrated marital beliefs and practices that were in opposition to patriarchal marriage.

I again marked
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A
, and the OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D
.

Please explain the above two questions.

Help appreciated.



This one I somehow managed to get right.
{A} In A I caught the word DEGREE and re read the first para again to realize that no where the author compares this habit of educated young Quaker in anyways to suggest that a Degree Measure was mentioned. It simply mention that these women were engaged in that resistance by way of poetry and no where any Degree comparison of this poetry way (to critique marriage) with any other Item.

{D} is the perfect Paraphrase of author's mention that "Here Wulf probably overstates Quaker schools’ impact.
At least three years’ study would be necessary to
achieve the literacy competence necessary to grapple
with the material she analyzes."
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Re: In her account of unmarried women’s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2012, 22:09
wow, i got both of them correct :-D , but took 9mins

In the first question, option A talks about the exemplars of the critque of a marriage could be found in various literary forms, no where in the passage author suggests that these exemplars are supported in various literary forms, indeed exemplars, here common place books(if considered various literary forms) did impact public attitudes of other than young educated women(middle class)...you need to justify every word for the answer to be correct.

Second question,option A says, Wulf exaggerates the degree to which young women from an elite background..... from the passage," Here Wulf probably overstates Quaker schools’ impact." clearly you can infer that young women from an elite background = quaker's school, no where in the passage the same is suggetsed,..moreover Wulf exaggerates the impact not the "the degree (to which young women from an elite background regarded) the poetry as providing a critique of marriage"

Hope this helps

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Re: In her account of unmarried women’s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2012, 23:15
chandangv wrote:
wow, i got both of them correct :-D , but took 9mins

In the first question, option A talks about the exemplars of the critque of a marriage could be found in various literary forms, no where in the passage author suggests that these exemplars are supported in various literary forms, indeed exemplars, here common place books(if considered various literary forms) did impact public attitudes of other than young educated women(middle class)...you need to justify every word for the answer to be correct.

Second question,option A says, Wulf exaggerates the degree to which young women from an elite background..... from the passage," Here Wulf probably overstates Quaker schools’ impact." clearly you can infer that young women from an elite background = quaker's school, no where in the passage the same is suggetsed,..moreover Wulf exaggerates the impact not the "the degree (to which young women from an elite background regarded) the poetry as providing a critique of marriage"

Hope this helps



Yes mate, indeed both are right . Passage + 2 questions 9 minutes. I took 9 mins total ( RC +4 ques) .

Phew , no wonder I got 2 wrong :)
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Re: In her account of unmarried women s experiences in colonial [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 12:02
1)The key is the first sentence of the second paragraph: "Wulf overstates the Quaker school's impact" - this critique of Wulf focuses on schools - the vehicle of 'dissemination'. A is correct.
2)A, B, D, and E are not supported by the passage - only C is.
A - contradicts the argument in the second paragraph.
B - no information to support this idea - the attitudes may have been disparate within and without the schools
D - not supported by the passage.
E - the reverse of what is claimed in para 1, that ideas came from the elites to the population at large.
3)A is not implied in the passage. B - contradicts what is explicitly stated in para 1. C - contradicts the passage. E - not supported in the passage. The poetry did not celebrate alternative beliefs, but rather simply criticized marriage. This leaves D - which corresponds to the author's critique of Wulf's theory, articulated in para 2.
4)B is correct because the critique states the the poor women would have needed higher literacy, but if we establish that the poor women did indeed have a higher level, this would undermine the author's claim that Wulf had 'overstated' (=exaggerated) the influence of the Quaker schools.
A - is incorrect because the data on affiliation and gender has no bearing on the impact of schools, which is due to the accessibility of the poetry. The critique does not claim that these groups of women never met.
C is incorrect because it is sufficient for some of the women to have been Quakers for the ideas to be disseminated via schools.
D - this statement supports, rather than undermines the author's critique of Wulf (that the poetry would have been inaccessible)
E - This supports Wulf's theory, but does not undermine the critique. The critique could claim that regardless of how many women attended the schools - the poetry was inaccessible to them.
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Re: In her account of unmarried women s experiences in colonial   [#permalink] 02 Jul 2017, 12:02
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