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In January 1994 an oil barge ran aground off the coast of

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Joined: 09 Jun 2010
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Re: In January 1994 an oil barge ran aground off the coast of [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 20:33
WillEconomistGMAT wrote:
Just to add some clarification to the "while" discussion here.

"While" is typically used as a stand-in for either "although," "but," or "during." The takeaway for this problem is that you typically only set "while" off with a comma when using it to express contrasts. Consider the following sentences:

(1) While John doesn't usually like to exercise, he has been running more often since his sister gave him an MP3 player.
(2) John prefers classical music, while his sister prefers jazz.
(3) He listens to dubstep while running.

For the original problem, the phrase following while does not express a contrast, so it is incorrectly punctuated. Even if it were expressing duration, it would be incorrect.


"while" is not alway used to show a contrast. it can be used to show a time during which another action happen.

the key to this problem is understanding the meaning relation between main clause and "comma +doing". only if we know this relation, we can get full explanation for the problem.

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Kudos [?]: 168 [0], given: 916

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In January 1994 an oil barge ran aground off the coast of [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 20:43
WillEconomistGMAT wrote:
Just to add some clarification to the "while" discussion here.

"While" is typically used as a stand-in for either "although," "but," or "during." The takeaway for this problem is that you typically only set "while" off with a comma when using it to express contrasts. Consider the following sentences:

(1) While John doesn't usually like to exercise, he has been running more often since his sister gave him an MP3 player.
(2) John prefers classical music, while his sister prefers jazz.
(3) He listens to dubstep while running.

For the original problem, the phrase following while does not express a contrast, so it is incorrectly punctuated. Even if it were expressing duration, it would be incorrect.


REPOST from another thread :


I am not sure whether it was in the forums or any videos from Ron I found the following two usages of "While"
I hope it might be of any help to you.
"While" can actually mean two things:
1) while = at the same time as. I practice piano while twiddling my thumbs. (I’m very talented!) I practice piano at the same time as I twiddle my thumbs.
2) while = although, or some sort of contrast. While it’s true that I play piano and know how to twiddle my thumbs, I obviously can’t do both of those things at the same time. That would be impossible!"
Even the examples are also courtesy the same source.

Could you elaborate more on the usage ?

WHy cannot we consider first usage of while for this qsn ?

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Re: In January 1994 an oil barge ran aground off the coast of [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2017, 11:22
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Re: In January 1994 an oil barge ran aground off the coast of   [#permalink] 25 Oct 2017, 11:22

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