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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K

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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 18:26
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

57% (01:05) correct 43% (01:09) wrong based on 184 sessions

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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous

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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 19:01
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aragonn wrote:
In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous


+1 for D

Split 1:
'He' is ambiguous here. Is 'he' referring to president or the general himself? Who knows? I know that we know, to whom 'he' refers to but the sentence doesn't convey the same ;)
Eliminate A, B, C

Split 2:
Idiom used Consider X Y/ Consider X as Y
Both D and E use correct idiom but in E the second clause screws up the meaning of the sentence. Hence eliminate E

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 21:39
Akash720 wrote:
aragonn wrote:
In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous


+1 for D

Split 1:
'He' is ambiguous here. Is 'he' referring to president or the general himself? Who knows? I know that we know, to whom 'he' refers to but the sentence doesn't convey the same ;)
Eliminate A, B, C

Split 2:
Idiom used Consider X Y/ Consider X as Y
Both D and E use correct idiom but in E the second clause screws up the meaning of the sentence. Hence eliminate E

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous


How is option E wrong?
that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous

As the conjunction "and" is in between two sub-verb pairs (he-considered)-(it-was), the use of comma is correct, isn't it?
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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 20 Sep 2018, 22:24
shiva007 wrote:

How is option E wrong?
that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous

As the conjunction "and" is in between two sub-verb pairs (he-considered)-(it-was), the use of comma is correct, isn't it?


In my opinion, option E changes the intended meaning of the original sentence.

Meaning in A:
The general did one thing i.e.,
considered some X theory to be ridiculous in something.

Meaning in E:
The general did consider some X theory and that consideration was ridiculous. Hence, option E distorts the meaning conveyed.

E maybe grammatically correct but changes the meaning.

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Originally posted by Akash720 on 20 Sep 2018, 21:52.
Last edited by Akash720 on 20 Sep 2018, 22:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 21:54
I actually selected B.
Part 1: Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory"- He makes sense considering the Subject is MacArthur.
Part 2:“domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age. Removing the modifier in B (which clearly is the modifier of the preceding term) of domino theory, the sentence reads as follows:
Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory" ridiculous in the nuclear age.
as per idiom- consider x y, and B satisfies this rule and the meaning of the sentence is clear and not wordy.
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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 22:01
taniad wrote:
I actually selected B.
Part 1: Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory"- He makes sense considering the Subject is MacArthur.
Part 2:“domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age. Removing the modifier in B (which clearly is the modifier of the preceding term) of domino theory, the sentence reads as follows:
Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory" ridiculous in the nuclear age.
as per idiom- consider x y, and B satisfies this rule and the meaning of the sentence is clear and not wordy.


Part 1: Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory"- He makes sense considering the Subject is MacArthur.

Here the pronoun "he" have no clear antecedent. It can also be used for "President Kennedy".
For example:- Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he(President Kennedy) considered the “domino theory"....

I hope that helps.
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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 22:27
shiva007 wrote:
taniad wrote:
I actually selected B.
Part 1: Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory"- He makes sense considering the Subject is MacArthur.
Part 2:“domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age. Removing the modifier in B (which clearly is the modifier of the preceding term) of domino theory, the sentence reads as follows:
Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory" ridiculous in the nuclear age.
as per idiom- consider x y, and B satisfies this rule and the meaning of the sentence is clear and not wordy.


Part 1: Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he considered the “domino theory"- He makes sense considering the Subject is MacArthur.

Here the pronoun "he" have no clear antecedent. It can also be used for "President Kennedy".
For example:- Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy that he(President Kennedy) considered the “domino theory"....

I hope that helps.



The pronoun reference does make it a bit of an issue, but the idiom that I learnt from artistotle very clearly stated that consider x y:
eg: x= you, y= my friends
Correct: I consider you my friend
incorrect: I consider you to be my friend
incorrect: I consider you as my friend.

I am assuming the 2 part to this sentence's idiom as:
Consider domino theory ridiculous,
and the modifier of domino theory is the justification of America's involvement in the Vietnam war.

Keeping the idiom and modifier in mind I eliminated everything except B.
Analyzing B with the entire sentence, for the pronoun reference: the subject told XYZ that he .... in this case, he makes perfect pronoun reference to the noun that is performing the action; Kennedy is just the object in the sentence who doesn't perform any action.

IMO, the pronoun reference is clear with B as the modifier and idiom is clear. Will wait for OA and check for Pronouns again.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 23:23
Consider X Y is the only right idiom.
Consider X as Y and consider X to be Y both are wrong.


A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous


Only A and B pass the idiom test.
in A..domino theory is written in past tense 'which was..'
in fact that theory isn't retired, it must exist now. Better to write that in a way B is composed.

B must be the right answer.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2018, 02:33
Considered to be..
Considered as...

Above both are wrong idioms.

Consider X Y is correct.

Option B is perfect and right.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2018, 19:11

Official Explanation


A question about conversations between General MacArthur and President Kennedy.

Split #1: idioms. The correct idiom for “consider” is

to consider A B

“to consider” + [noun] + [noun/adjective]

Here, this should be “considered the ‘domino theory’ ridiculous.” Putting an “as” or “to be” between the noun & adjective is incorrect. Choices (C) & (D) & (E) make these mistakes.

Split #2: in the formal language of the GMAT, anything “told” should begin with the word “that.” Choice (A) is the only one that omits the “that” so it is wrong.

These two splits are enough to isolate (B) as the answer, but it’s important to appreciate other problems with the wrong answers. (A) is simply bloated and wordy. In (C), the meaning changes: here, the idea that the “domino theory” is the “justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam” is presented as MacArthur’s own idea, rather than objective fact; furthermore, the phrase “making it ridiculous” is both ambiguous and far too colloquial for the GMAT. In (D), we have the unnecessary and redundant repetition of MacArthur’s name. In (E), the final “it” is ambiguous and incorrect.

The best answer is (B).
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In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2018, 20:07
A - "that" is needed for more clarity.
D,E - Rejected on the ground that "MacArthur" is making sentence wordy.
The doubt will arise in mind of some people that the usage of "He" is ambiguous in b and c.
But "he" is the subject case for pronoun and cannot refers to the object(Kennedy)
C - making... acts as a modifier but it does not have any proper action or clause to modify.

Hence, B is the answer.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2018, 23:22
aragonn wrote:
In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President Kennedy he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous in the nuclear age

A. he considered the “domino theory,” which was the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
B. that he considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, ridiculous
C. that he considered the “domino theory” to be the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, making it ridiculous
D. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory,” the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, to be ridiculous
E. that he, MacArthur, considered the “domino theory” as the justification for America’s involvement in Vietnam, and it was ridiculous


Hi aragonn,

Doesn't B has a typo error. Shouldn't the comma come after "domino theory", instead of "domino theory,". Please correct me if I am wrong.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2018, 23:32
Yes it should, but question is given this way. I have not changed it. May be its a typo from magoosh side. Definitely its awkward.
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Re: In late 1961, the legendary general Douglas MacArthur told President K &nbs [#permalink] 21 Sep 2018, 23:32
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