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In stating the argument that the President does not care

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2010, 11:37
I came till D (or) E...but how to differentiate between Inferred & Implied here?

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2010, 07:06
I understand why 'it' should be used instead of 'them' but why choose imply over infer? originally the sentence uses the word infer, aren't we changing its meaning?

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2010, 11:05
IMO in order to for "infer" have the same meaning as "imply" it would (somehow) have to be together with the preposition "from" like in "from A you can infer that B"

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2010, 00:21
Its E. Only E referes to the plight.

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2011, 00:11
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The Answer is E

For Everyone Reference
NFER vs. IMPLY

The best way to remember the difference between these two words is to think in terms of the model used by communications theorists. Communication consists of a message, a sender, and a receiver. The sender can imply, but the receiver can only infer. The error that usually occurs is that the word infer is mistakenly used for imply.


WRONG: Are you inferring that I am a fool?
RIGHT: Are you implying that I am a fool?


If someone gets the idea from your behavior that you are a fool, then he is inferring that you are a fool. But if he is subtly letting you know that he thinks so, then he is implying that you are a fool. You, of course, can infer from his implication that he thinks you are a fool.


IMPLY = to put the suggestion into the message (sender implies)

INFER = to take the suggestion out of the message (receiver infers)

IMPLICATION = what the sender has implied

INFERENCE = what the receiver has inferred

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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2011, 07:12
though one..I thought B at first, then E :)
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2011, 08:59
My first choice was B but after seeing the explanations here i too believe that the answer should be E only.
It refers to the phrase "plight of the poor" but i am still not 100% about the infer vs imply argument.
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2011, 01:47
it refers "the plight"
Hence answer is "E"
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Re: SC-Democrat [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2011, 22:46
Implied is firstly the preferred choice. Furthermore, only E qualifies to be a good pick.
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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2011, 22:35
Simply E

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2011, 02:22
IMO E,

"It" refers to "Plight" hence Options D,E are valid.
Out of D & E the Difference between Imply & Infer can be used to futher split the choices.
I first chose D but its now clear why the answer is E.

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2012, 04:15
Yes, GMAT may test correct diction, such as "economic" versus "economical", but I think testing "infer" versus "imply" is not quite GMAT's style.

Sentence Correction can make or break your score. It is advisable to keep one's practice to GMAT-style questions; this way, you would look for the right signals on test day, maximizing your output on the test, instead of ferreting for red herrings on test day.

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2012, 05:03
Implied is better than Inferred, which leaves C and E.

The plight OF the poor--> plight should have the pronoun "it", not "them".

Answer is E.

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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In stating the argument that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.

A prominent democrat will never infer, he/she can only imply a new point in order to demean the republicans so implied is a better choice.

(A) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
them-incorrect pronoun for "plight"
(B) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about the poor.
incorrect - plight not poor
(C) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
them-incorrect pronoun for "plight"
(D) a prominent Democrat inferred that Republicans have never been concerned about it.
inferred -incorrect
(E) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about it.
it refers to the plight not the poor -correct
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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 07:40
I chose B. The explanations above have really been helpful. I missed the fact of imply/infer as well that it is not the poor people but their plight that was being referred to. Could have avoided this mistake by reading more carefully.

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 08:39
C) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
(E) a prominent Democrat implied that Republicans have never been concerned about it.

I get muddled with this type of nuances.
Here 'them' can refer back to 'the poor'. Also 'it' can refer back to 'the plight of the poor'. As per me, there is no grammatical mistake in these two sentence.

So, is there any solid logic to score out answer choice 'C'?
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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2013, 04:25
Why should the pronoun "it" refers to the plight of the poor? Why should not the pronoun "them" refers to the poor.

I think there is nothing in the original sentence that suggests they have not concerned about the plight.

I got the infer vs imply and chose E.

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2013, 17:49
I picked B over E...but now I see why it's E....thanks for the explanations...

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2013, 11:08
In stating the argument that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat (inferred syn;deduce,conclude,generalised,derived)/(implied syn;connoted,indirectly,latent,hidden etc) that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
looking at the two infered and implied, and base on the augment about the president's negligence of the poor which is the plight(it)/trouble/condition/predicament. i will go for 'D'

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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care [#permalink]

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1terrific wrote:
In stating the argument that the President does not care about the plight of the poor, a prominent Democrat (inferred syn;deduce,conclude,generalised,derived)/(implied syn;connoted,indirectly,latent,hidden etc) that Republicans have never been concerned about them.
looking at the two infered and implied, and base on the augment about the president's negligence of the poor which is the plight(it)/trouble/condition/predicament. i will go for 'D'


Hi 1terrific

Welcome to gmatclub :)

D is wrong because "infer" is used incorrectly in the sentence's context.

Let think this way.
IMPLY vs INFER
Communication consists of a message, a sender, and a receiver. The sender can imply, but the receiver can only infer. Very often, the word infer is mistakenly used for imply.

For example:
WRONG: Peter infers that he is the best student <-- Peter is the sender, he can only imply
CORRECT: Peter implies that he is the best student.

Back to the question, the prominent Democrat in stating blah blah... implied that............. <== because he is the sender of the message, thus he can only imply, not infer.

Hope it helps.
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Re: In stating the argument that the President does not care   [#permalink] 20 Aug 2013, 16:06

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