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In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with

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In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Aug 2019, 20:53
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A
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C
D
E

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In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence of a murder case to establish the guilt or innocence of the defendant.

(A) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
(B) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidential
(C) occupations, personalities, and temperaments, weighs evidence
(D) personality types and occupations weighs evidently
(E) temperaments, personality styles, and occupations weighs the evidence

Originally posted by JanarthCj on 06 Apr 2017, 10:08.
Last edited by hazelnut on 27 Aug 2019, 20:53, edited 2 times in total.
Underlined properly
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 15:04
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Arunavamunshi1988, the main issue with (C) is that there's no need for the comma after "temperaments" -- though I can't think of any GMAT questions that ever really test the comma in that way. So don't worry about it too much.

The missing article in (C) is also a minor problem -- since we're talking about the specific evidence of the murder case, it should probably be "the evidence of a murder case" instead of just "evidence of a murder case." But I'm hard-pressed to think of many real GMAT questions that test that specific issue in that specific way, either.

And "different" shouldn't be underlined, fwiw. :)
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 10:47
I did not understand what was wrong with ans choice C? Can anybody please explain?
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New post 06 Apr 2017, 11:12
Priyancee wrote:
Is the answer E ?


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Yes the Answer is E.

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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 11:20
Hi,
Shouldn't the answer have the word different. In Answer E that is missing.

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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 00:43
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But what is the need or significance of the changed word order in the list at whim and fancy? Are the word order and the meaning absurd in the original to warrant a change? Any logic?
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 02:08
In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence of a murder case to establish the guilt or innocence of the defendant.

jury..weighs.

A) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
B) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidential
C) occupations, personalities, and temperaments, weighs evidence
D) personality types and occupations weighs evidently
E) temperaments, personality styles, and occupations weighs the evidence
CORRECT.
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 03:33
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In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence of a murder case to establish the guilt or innocence of the defendant.

A) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
B) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidential
C) occupations, personalities, and temperaments, weighs evidence
D) personality types and occupations weighs evidently
E) temperaments, personality styles, and occupations weighs the evidence

While jury is collective subject and needs a singular verb weighs.
adjectives like evidential, adverbs like evidently change the intended meaning of the sentence as is in case of options B and D.
comma remains the sole spoilsport in option C..........changing the structure.
redundant phrase personality styles surprisingly standsout as the correct answer choice.
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 03:54
Can anyone explain how E is the OA? Shouldn't the main point be that the jury is composed of different kinds of American men? That is missing in E, isn't it?
Moreover, can't the subject be American men and not the jury. That would imply that the original sentence is correct?
Kindly help in understanding this.
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 03:55
I feel "different" should not be part of the underlined section. I feel its a typo since option A does not contain "different".

Without different, we will read the portion as --> a jury made up of American men with temperaments, personality styles, and occupations.

The essence is jury is made up of people with different characteristics.


Jury is singular and hence we need singular verb. Options A and B are out.

Comma issue in option C.

In option D, it should be evidence and not evidently.

Option E seems to be the best choice
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2017, 14:05
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From Daagh:

Quote:
But what is the need or significance of the changed word order in the list at whim and fancy? Are the word order and the meaning absurd in the original to warrant a change? Any logic?


Nope, I don't see any real logic to the the changed word order of the list. Looks like a random thing that the question-writers did to distract us, but just rearranging the list doesn't do anything to the meaning of the sentence. And I can't think of any official GMAT questions that do the same sort of thing. Seems really, really arbitrary to me.
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2017, 03:54
In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence of a murder case to establish the guilt or innocence of the defendant.

A) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
B) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidential
C) occupations, personalities, and temperaments, weighs evidence
D) personality types and occupations weighs evidently missing temperaments and evidently is wrong
E) temperaments, personality styles, and occupations weighs the evidence correct
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 05:37
Hi guys,

Can someone clarify why it's weighs vs. weigh? I studied the MGMAT sentence correction book, and it says when we have 'a group of workers' this is plural. But, if we have 'the group of workers', this is singular. Given 'a jury', why is jury singular?

Thanks for your help!

P.S. Twelve Angry Men is a great movie, one which I highly recommend (Family Guy did a parity of it as well).
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2017, 05:41
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nightblade354 wrote:
Hi guys,

Can someone clarify why it's weighs vs. weigh? I studied the MGMAT sentence correction book, and it says when we have 'a group of workers' this is plural. But, if we have 'the group of workers', this is singular. Given 'a jury', why is jury singular?

Thanks for your help!

P.S. Twelve Angry Men is a great movie, one which I highly recommend (Family Guy did a parity of it as well).

Collective nouns -- such as "jury" or "army" or "band" -- are generally singular, even though we know that they might represent multiple people. So all of these are correct:

  • A band of Mongolian guitarists IS playing at Red Rocks Amphitheater tonight.
  • An army of ants IS attacking my picnic right now.
  • A jury of 12 citizens IS listening to the defense attorney's closing arguments.

"Group" is a funny case, though -- it can be either singular or plural, depending on the situation, and grammar experts don't always agree on the nuances of how to use it. The short version is that "group" is generally singular if its members are acting in tandem ("the group of test-takers IS planning an assault on GMAC headquarters"), but plural if the individuality of the members is emphasized ("the group of grammar experts ARE arguing about collective nouns right now"). This gets messy.

But don't lose sleep over those messy cases! The GMAT generally stays far away from anything that is even vaguely controversial among grammar and style experts. Sure, you'll see a few collective nouns on the GMAT, but they'll generally be very clearly singular. I can't think of any official questions that require you to strain any brain cells worrying about whether "group" or "jury" might somehow be plural. So don't worry about this too much -- and in this particular question, "jury" is unambiguously singular.

I hope this helps!
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2017, 06:16
GMATNinja wrote:
nightblade354 wrote:
Hi guys,

Can someone clarify why it's weighs vs. weigh? I studied the MGMAT sentence correction book, and it says when we have 'a group of workers' this is plural. But, if we have 'the group of workers', this is singular. Given 'a jury', why is jury singular?

Thanks for your help!

P.S. Twelve Angry Men is a great movie, one which I highly recommend (Family Guy did a parity of it as well).

Collective nouns -- such as "jury" or "army" or "band" -- are generally singular, even though we know that they might represent multiple people. So all of these are correct:

  • A band of Mongolian guitarists IS playing at Red Rocks Amphitheater tonight.
  • An army of ants IS attacking my picnic right now.
  • A jury of 12 citizens IS listening to the defense attorney's closing arguments.

"Group" is a funny case, though -- it can be either singular or plural, depending on the situation, and grammar experts don't always agree on the nuances of how to use it. The short version is that "group" is generally singular if its members are acting in tandem ("the group of test-takers IS planning an assault on GMAC headquarters"), but plural if the individuality of the members is emphasized ("the group of grammar experts ARE arguing about collective nouns right now"). This gets messy.

But don't lose sleep over those messy cases! The GMAT generally stays far away from anything that is even vaguely controversial among grammar and style experts. Sure, you'll see a few collective nouns on the GMAT, but they'll generally be very clearly singular. I can't think of any official questions that require you to strain any brain cells worrying about whether "group" or "jury" might somehow be plural. So don't worry about this too much -- and in this particular question, "jury" is unambiguously singular.

I hope this helps!


Thanks, GMATNinja! This makes perfect sense, and I see where I went wrong. I guess I over thought the example in MGMAT.
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 11:06
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GMATNinja wrote:
nightblade354 wrote:
Hi guys,

Can someone clarify why it's weighs vs. weigh? I studied the MGMAT sentence correction book, and it says when we have 'a group of workers' this is plural. But, if we have 'the group of workers', this is singular. Given 'a jury', why is jury singular?

Thanks for your help!

P.S. Twelve Angry Men is a great movie, one which I highly recommend (Family Guy did a parity of it as well).

Collective nouns -- such as "jury" or "army" or "band" -- are generally singular, even though we know that they might represent multiple people. So all of these are correct:

  • A band of Mongolian guitarists IS playing at Red Rocks Amphitheater tonight.
  • An army of ants IS attacking my picnic right now.
  • A jury of 12 citizens IS listening to the defense attorney's closing arguments.

"Group" is a funny case, though -- it can be either singular or plural, depending on the situation, and grammar experts don't always agree on the nuances of how to use it. The short version is that "group" is generally singular if its members are acting in tandem ("the group of test-takers IS planning an assault on GMAC headquarters"), but plural if the individuality of the members is emphasized ("the group of grammar experts ARE arguing about collective nouns right now"). This gets messy.

But don't lose sleep over those messy cases! The GMAT generally stays far away from anything that is even vaguely controversial among grammar and style experts. Sure, you'll see a few collective nouns on the GMAT, but they'll generally be very clearly singular. I can't think of any official questions that require you to strain any brain cells worrying about whether "group" or "jury" might somehow be plural. So don't worry about this too much -- and in this particular question, "jury" is unambiguously singular.

I hope this helps!


GMATNinja
("the group of test-takers IS planning an assault on GMAC headquarters")
That example though :lol: :lol:
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 14:24
Answering this though I got it wrong :) as I realized it after answering

Jury is singular and so weigh is wrong, this rule actually eliminates A and B
In C, the sentence
a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
is enclosed in commas meaning that this whole sentence is a modifier. The sentence would read:
In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men , ------, weighs .....
This does not make sense, so C is wrong

In D evidently is wrong.

Therefore only option is E which is correct

In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with different personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence of a murder case to establish the guilt or innocence of the defendant.

A) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidence
B) personalities, occupations, and temperaments weigh the evidential
C) occupations, personalities, and temperaments, weighs evidence
D) personality types and occupations weighs evidently
E) temperaments, personality styles, and occupations weighs the evidence
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Re: In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with   [#permalink] 27 Aug 2019, 14:24

In the 1957 film Twelve Angry Men, a jury made up of American men with

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