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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax

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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2019, 00:27
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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!” as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him.

A - as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him

B - as an axe, which is intended to be used to execute him, was being sharpened

C - while the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened

D - as an axe intended to be used to execute him was being sharpened

E - while they sharpened an axe that was intended to be used to execute him

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Re: In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2019, 19:51
Skyline393 wrote:
In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!” as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him.

A - as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him

B - as an axe, which is intended to be used to execute him, was being sharpened

C - while the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened

D - as an axe intended to be used to execute him was being sharpened

E - while they sharpened an axe that was intended to be used to execute him



In the original sentence, that is A, there is no antecedent of pronoun THEY, so eliminate. So does goes choice E.
To remove THEY, we have to convert the second clause in passive voice.

Now both AS and WHILE are correctly used as conjunctions to talk of two events that are happening together.
From the above word ' happening together' comes the reason to eliminate the wrong choices.

The two events exclaiming and sharpening should be in same tense..
Exclaims is parallel in tense to is being sharpened..

So C is the best answer.
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Re: In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2019, 23:17
A) No antecedent for they.
B)B says 'Freedom' is function related to axe.
C)Correct answer
D)Same as B.
E)Awkward and wrong use of they
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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2019, 19:00
chetan2u wrote:
Skyline393 wrote:
In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!” as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him.

A - as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him

B - as an axe, which is intended to be used to execute him, was being sharpened

C - while the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened

D - as an axe intended to be used to execute him was being sharpened

E - while they sharpened an axe that was intended to be used to execute him



In the original sentence, that is A, there is no antecedent of pronoun THEY, so eliminate. So does goes choice E.
To remove THEY, we have to convert the second clause in passive voice.

Now both AS and WHILE are correctly used as conjunctions to talk of two events that are happening together.
From the above word ' happening together' comes the reason to eliminate the wrong choices.

The two events exclaiming and sharpening should be in same tense..
Exclaims is parallel in tense to is being sharpened..

So C is the best answer.


Hey chetan2u

Exclaims - Present tense
is being sharpened - Past Continuous Tense

Can you tell me how are they both parallel? Let me know If I am wrong in my above analysis
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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2019, 04:22
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pikolo2510

Quote:
Exclaims - Present tense
is being sharpened - Past Continuous Tense

Can you tell me how are they both parallel? Let me know If I am wrong in my above analysis


Hope I can pitch in ;) .

Here is the original sentence again:
Quote:
In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!” as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him.

The sentence presents a few facts about Mel Gibson’s character William Wallac.
It says in the climax of the film Braveheart, the characters exclaims 'Freedom'
Simultaneously (as you recall while can represent two simultaneous actions or a contrast)
an axe is being sharpened. This axe is intended to execute him (him = William Wallace)

The sentence does not test parallelism per se, it tests on usage of pronoun (they is incorrect)
and usage as/while (recall that as is used as a role when followed by noun and in comparison
when followed by a clause). Hope you understood that we can not use as here since this is
illogical comparison (axe = character)

Here is correct split of sentence:
In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!”
while (i.e. simultaneously)
the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened
intended to be used is modifier (ask: does it give more info about axe -yes)

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Re: In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2019, 06:05
Hey adkikani

Thank for your help. Although I got this question right, i was unclear on chetan2u's reasoning and hence my query to him?

Can you help to answer that query?
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In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2019, 11:18
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pikolo2510 wrote:
. Although I got this question right, i was unclear on chetan2u's reasoning and hence my query to him?

Can you help to answer that query?

Skyline393 wrote:
In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s character William Wallace defiantly exclaims “Freedom!” as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him.

A - as they sharpen the axe intended to be used to execute him

B - as an axe, which is intended to be used to execute him, was being sharpened

C - while the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened

D - as an axe intended to be used to execute him was being sharpened

E - while they sharpened an axe that was intended to be used to execute him

Hi pikolo2510 , I address your question below. :)

Hot pink = an error that I needed to set off from red because
the pink word is a different error.

Split #1 They must have an antecedent
Options A and E sneak in the word they.
No antecedent exists: who are they?
Mentally, we often supply the doers/agents in such contsructions.

We cannot do so.
Grammatically, they must have an antecedent.

Eliminate A and E

Split #2: Reporting an event: take the verb tense cue from the non-underlined part

In the non-underlined portion, an event (a film scene)
is being reported.
We read, William Wallace defiantly exclaims

When an event is reported, even though the event happened in the past
(the film has already been made), we stay with the tense of the first verb
unless we are given reason to use a different tense.
We might see words such as "before he exclaims..."
We might see a "time stamp": at 11 a.m., Wallace exclaims XYZ, while [contrast!] at 1 p.m. the axe [something about sharp]

In this sentence, no different time stamp exists. All the verbs must be in the present tense to match "exclaims."

In this case we see time-stamp while, which in this context means "simultaneously."

Every verb that follows should be in some form of present tense.

Option B incorrectly uses simple past in passive voice: axe was sharpened.

Option D incorrectly uses past continuous in passive voice: axe was being sharpened.

Option E incorrectly uses simple past in passive voice: axe was sharpened.

The auxiliary or helping verb determines the verb tense.

Eliminate options B and D (already eliminated E).

• Note about passive voice and past participle sharpened

Passive voice is correct.
-- We do not know who the actors/agents are.
-- The focus is on what is being sharpened, not on who is sharpening.
-- If we want to focus on the object (the thing done to) and not the doer;
or if we do not know who or what the doer is;
in English, as a convention, we write the sentence in passive voice
-- The problem in A, B, and E is not sharpened.
The problem in A, B, and E is the past tense helping verb WAS.
The helping verb determines the verb tense, not the participle. See notes below.

• By POE, option C is correct. Check.

...William Wallace defiantly exclaims while the axe intended to be used to execute him is being sharpened

Correct. Simple present (exclaims) is followed by present progressive in the passive voice (IS being sharpened).

• Present progressive (present continuous) tense in ACTIVE and PASSIVE voices?

-- The ACTIVE voice in the present progressive tense (also called "continuous") is formed with
IS/ARE + present participle
example: He IS sharpening

The active voice (use present participle!) modifies the doer.
We cannot write, the axe is sharpening.
Axes do not sharpen themselves.

-- The PASSIVE voice in the present progressive tense is formed with
IS/ARE + being + past participle

The passive voice (use past participle!) in this case (is being sharpened) correctly modifies the axe, the object that takes the action, the thing that is "done to"

(the axe is the object of the transitive verb "to sharpen")

In this sentence, we could not say, the executioner is being sharpened (e.g., by a whetstone).

In English, very often, if an object is involved and is the focus of the verb,
passive voice is correct. Passive voice highlights the object,
the recipient of the action . . . the thing "done to" rather than the doer of the action.

The present participle [verbING] in this construction usually highlights the doer.

The past participle [verbED] in this construction usually highlights the thing or person "done to."

This guideline is what adkikani mentions. +1

Correct: I am counting the votes. (present participle, but the whole verb is in present tense because of the word AM)
The participle counting modifies what? The person, the active doer.

Correct: The votes are being counted. (past participle, but the whole verb is in present tense because of the word ARE)
The participle counted modifies what? The things, the not-active votes, the things that are "done to."

Both examples above are in the present tense, as are the verbs in option C.

pikolo2510 , I think you just got a little mixed up.
"is being sharpened" is in the present tense.

-- is, the helping verb, determines the tense.
-- Although we call sharpened a past participle,
participles do not actually have tense
(as we can see: this "past" participle is used in a present tense verb)
-- a participle takes its tense from the working verb

C is correct.
It couples simple present (exclaims) with present progressive in passive voice (IS being sharpened).

I hope that analysis helps. :)
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Re: In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2019, 05:43
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Re: In the climax of the film Braveheart, Mel Gibson’s In the climax   [#permalink] 17 Mar 2019, 05:43
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