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In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line

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In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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In the figure above, points A, B, C, D, and E lie on a line. A is on both circles, B is the center of the smaller circle, C is the center of the larger circle, D is on the smaller circle, and E is on the larger circle. What is the area of the region inside the larger circle and outside the smaller circle?

(1) AB = 3 and BC = 2
(2) CD = 1 and DE = 4


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In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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In the figure above, points A, B, C, D, and E lie on a line. A is on both circles, B is the center of the smaller circle, C is the center of the larger circle, D is on the smaller circle, and E is on the larger circle. What is the area of the region inside the larger circle and outside the smaller circle?

We need to find the value of \(\pi{R^2}-\pi{r^2}\), where R is the radius of the larger circle and r is the radius of the smaller circle. So, bascally we need to find R and r.

(1) AB = 3 and BC = 2 --> \(AB=r=3\) and \(AB+BC=AC=5=R\). Sufficient.

(2) CD = 1 and DE = 4 --> \(CD+DE=CE=R=5\). Next, \(AD+DE=AE=DIAMETER=2R=10\), and since \(AD=2r\), then \(2r+DE=10\) --> \(2r+4=10\) --> \(r=3\). Sufficient.

Answer: D.
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 Oct 2015, 00:23
4
1
From the figure we know that:
B is the center of the smaller circle
C is the center of the larger circle
We have to find out area of region i.e area obtained when area of the smaller circle removed from area of the larger circle.

Statement 1

AB=3 and BC= 2

from this statement we know radius of the smaller circle i.e 3(AB) and radius of the larger circle as well \(3+2=5 (AB+BC)\)
using radius of both the circle we can find the area of each circle and hence the required area.
Sufficient

Statement 2

CD=1 and DE=4

from this statement we know that radius of the larger circle is \(1+4=5 (CD+DE)\)
now for the smaller circle,we know that AE=10 and we know DE=4. therefore diameter of the smaller circle is \(10(AE)-4(DE)=6 (AC)\)
therefore radius of the smaller circle \(= 3 (\frac{AC}{2})\). using radius of both the circle we can find the area of each circle and hence the required area.
Sufficient

Answer D

Originally posted by AayushGMAT on 18 Sep 2014, 13:11.
Last edited by AayushGMAT on 26 Oct 2015, 00:23, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2014, 17:29
Kudos for the solution. I tried to solve the problem twice, but could not get it. I am hoping to start getting solutions to such problems with more practice :-|
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2014, 21:55
Bunuel - As we know CE=AC=5 so AD=2r=AC+CD=6, can this be an alternative way to confirm that statement#2 is sufficient?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2014, 06:05
Bunuel, are there any similar problems to this one?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2014, 11:35
In this question Why are we considering C towards left of D its not stated in the question that its in left of D its shown but not stated. C is given that its lie on the same line and its center of larger circle, But what if the C is towards right of D. Then we can not solve this question using only statement 2.

Should the diagram be considered as concrete not flexible?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2014, 16:22
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Parth Monga wrote:
In this question Why are we considering C towards left of D its not stated in the question that its in left of D its shown but not stated. C is given that its lie on the same line and its center of larger circle, But what if the C is towards right of D. Then we can not solve this question using only statement 2.

Should the diagram be considered as concrete not flexible?


OG13, page 272:
A figure accompanying a data sufficiency problem will conform to the information given in the question but will not necessarily conform to the additional information given in statements (1) and (2).
Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight and lines that appear jagged can also be assumed to be straight.
You may assume that the positions of points, angles, regions, and so forth exist in the order shown and that angle measures are greater than zero degrees.
All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

OG13, page 150:
Figures: A figure accompanying a problem solving question is intended to provide information useful in solving the problem. Figures are drawn as accurately as possible. Exceptions will be clearly noted. Lines shown as straight are straight, and lines that appear jagged are also straight. The positions of points, angles, regions, etc., exist in the order shown, and angle measures are greater than zero. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

Hope it helps.
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2014, 01:29
Bunuel wrote:
Parth Monga wrote:
In this question Why are we considering C towards left of D its not stated in the question that its in left of D its shown but not stated. C is given that its lie on the same line and its center of larger circle, But what if the C is towards right of D. Then we can not solve this question using only statement 2.

Should the diagram be considered as concrete not flexible?


OG13, page 272:
A figure accompanying a data sufficiency problem will conform to the information given in the question but will not necessarily conform to the additional information given in statements (1) and (2).
Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight and lines that appear jagged can also be assumed to be straight.
You may assume that the positions of points, angles, regions, and so forth exist in the order shown and that angle measures are greater than zero degrees.
All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

OG13, page 150:
Figures: A figure accompanying a problem solving question is intended to provide information useful in solving the problem. Figures are drawn as accurately as possible. Exceptions will be clearly noted. Lines shown as straight are straight, and lines that appear jagged are also straight. The positions of points, angles, regions, etc., exist in the order shown, and angle measures are greater than zero. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

Hope it helps.




This a lot Bunuel that solves my concern with this question. Thanks a lot for your help.
P.S. the content provided in your signature is quite good and helpful. Really appreciate your work and effort.
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In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2014, 00:08
Walkabout wrote:
Attachment:
Two circles.png
In the figure above, points A, B, C, D, and E lie on a line. A is on both circles, B is the center of the smaller circle, C is the center of the larger circle, D is on the smaller circle, and E is on the larger circle. What is the area of the region inside the larger circle and outside the smaller circle?


(1) AB = 3 and BC = 2
(2) CD = 1 and DE = 4



A - clearly sufficient
B- cd+de= radius so smaller circle can also be found if you use it in opposite direcetion - sufficient
OA:D
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2014, 01:47
I have one question, how do we know CE is the diameter. The problem never says it is?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2014, 06:50
Bunuel wrote:
Turkish wrote:
I have one question, how do we know CE is the diameter. The problem never says it is?


CE is the radius of the large circle because C is its center and E is on its circumference.


Sorry Bunuel may be I am not getting this. In the problem it never say E is one the circumference, It says E is on larger circle. Should we believe in what we see,even if its not mentioned?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2014, 07:06
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Turkish wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Turkish wrote:
I have one question, how do we know CE is the diameter. The problem never says it is?


CE is the radius of the large circle because C is its center and E is on its circumference.


Sorry Bunuel may be I am not getting this. In the problem it never say E is one the circumference, It says E is on larger circle. Should we believe in what we see,even if its not mentioned?


E is on the larger circle means that E is on the circumference.
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2015, 04:57
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We need to find AREA (BIG)-(SMALL) --> P*R^2 - P*R^2
1) AB=3, BC=2, R(big)=3+2=5, R(small)=3 Sufficient
2) CD=1, DE=4, Diameter of the big circle = CD+DE=5, Diameter of the small circle = AC+CD=5+1=6, Radius =3 Sufficient
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2015, 09:36
In this question what we need to decide is that area of both the circles can be calculated or not
Area of circle = π r^2
from (1):radius of inner circle = AB=3(given);Radius of outer circle = AC=AB+BC=3+2=5 Both area can be calculated. Hence Sufficient
from(2): radius of outer circle => AC=CE=CD+DE=1+4=5=>AD=AC+CD=5+1=6
radius of inner circle=>AB=BD(since b is the center and D is a point on inner circle)=AD/2=6/2=3. Both area can be calculated. Hence Sufficient

Answer: D

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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2018, 11:23
Bunuel wrote:
Image
In the figure above, points A, B, C, D, and E lie on a line. A is on both circles, B is the center of the smaller circle, C is the center of the larger circle, 0 is on the smaller circle, and E is on the larger circle. What is the area of the region inside the larger circle and outside the smaller circle?

We need to find the value of \(\pi{R^2}-\pi{r^2}\), where R is the radius of the larger circle and r is the radius of the smaller circle. So, bascally we need to find R and r.

(1) AB = 3 and BC = 2 --> \(AB=r=3\) and \(AB+BC=AC=5=R\). Sufficient.

(2) CD = 1 and DE = 4 --> \(CD+DE=CE=R=5\). Next, \(AD+DE=AE=DIAMETER=2R=10\), and since \(AD=2r\), then \(2r+DE=10\) --> \(2r+4=10\) --> \(r=3\). Sufficient.

Answer: D.




i dont get is D in the center ? :?
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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2018, 19:51
1
dave13 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Image
In the figure above, points A, B, C, D, and E lie on a line. A is on both circles, B is the center of the smaller circle, C is the center of the larger circle, D is on the smaller circle, and E is on the larger circle. What is the area of the region inside the larger circle and outside the smaller circle?

We need to find the value of \(\pi{R^2}-\pi{r^2}\), where R is the radius of the larger circle and r is the radius of the smaller circle. So, bascally we need to find R and r.

(1) AB = 3 and BC = 2 --> \(AB=r=3\) and \(AB+BC=AC=5=R\). Sufficient.

(2) CD = 1 and DE = 4 --> \(CD+DE=CE=R=5\). Next, \(AD+DE=AE=DIAMETER=2R=10\), and since \(AD=2r\), then \(2r+DE=10\) --> \(2r+4=10\) --> \(r=3\). Sufficient.

Answer: D.




i dont get is D in the center ? :?


No, D is not the centre of any circle in the image. Check the highlighted parts.
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PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

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Re: In the figure above, points A, B, C, 0, and E lie on a line &nbs [#permalink] 23 Aug 2018, 19:51
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