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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca

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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2020, 20:39
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E

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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.


A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except

E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in

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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2020, 21:25
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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.

IMO E
There are 2 laws -> Secular Administrative Law and Personal Law.
Now first of all the the term Qanun is not the law. It is referring to the law. Hence A, B, D are out.
Law is extended to all subjects
excepting is not an appropriate structure. It should be -> Law is extended to all subjects except those in realm of .......
Hence C is out.

For all Hindi speaking friends, it
kanoon andha hota hai

A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except
E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2020, 21:54
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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.

A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
- "the term... was the law"?? How can you have a term as a law? a term must refer to something.

B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
- '....was the law...' indicates that Qanun ''used to be'' a law in the past. (B) effectively tells us that this law ceased to exist in the past; this is obviously not the intended meaning of the sentence.

C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
- ...law that extended to all subjects, excepting...? "except" should have been used here instead of the present progressive tense 'excepting'.

D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except
- "Qanun....was the term...." indicates that the law ceased to exist at some time in the past.

Moreover, I believe that what follows 'except' (after the underlined portion) tries to highlight a situation where the "Qanun" is not applicable. Hence, you need to have the preposition 'in' right after the word 'except' to make complete sense.

E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in - here, we have no error. Hence, (E) is the right answer choice.
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2020, 22:08
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the error in the initial passage is that the term can refer to something, a term cannot be something -- E corrects this mistake
second part of the initial passage puts excepting for -- quite ugly except in is a more idiomatic form.

Correct answer is E
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In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 04 Jun 2020, 23:24
My answer: C

We can split the options based on the following:
1) "referred" is a keyword here since the term "Qanun" referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects. Hence a 3-2 split. Choose b/w C and E.
2) The next split is more idiom-based. "Excepting for" according to me seems more appropriate since as per my knowledge, excepting is related to the word "exception". By looking at the options, we can sense that excepting for is a better fit.

Hence C.
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Originally posted by aaditya0893 on 04 Jun 2020, 00:46.
Last edited by aaditya0893 on 04 Jun 2020, 23:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2020, 02:28
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IMO E

In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.


A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for- Incorrect - The term was not the secular administrative law; Expecting for incorrect

B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for - Incorrect - Qanam wasn't the secular administrative law but a term for administrative law

C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for Incorrect -

D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except- Incorrect - Except + preposition required.

E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in -Correct - Verb missing for the subject Qanum. Correct-
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2020, 05:34
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I do not think that this is a worthwhile question. After all ‘excepting for’ and ‘except’ are both prepositions and there is no great difference. As per usage terms by the Free Dictionary “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/excepting” except is better.
Usage: The use of ‘excepting’ is considered by many people to be acceptable only after not, only, or without. Elsewhere except is preferred: every country agreed to the proposal except (not excepting)
Therefore it is not clear what is these questions trying to make by the so-called splits. Only in the case of D, the preposition after except, in is missing and that makes a slight difference in the meaning. Perhaps ‘except’ in is slightly better than’ excepting for’ and therefore one may choose E grudgingly

On a different route, we can ignore all the choices that say that the term was qanun. The term is not the one that administered the law and therefore we can ignore choices A and B. Between and C and E, E is better for the sake of the use of the popular preposition ‘in.
Can anyone cite another such style based question from the Official side?
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2020, 09:05
I was so confused on this . Finally I am voting for D .
Below is my reasoning .

In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.

Meaning : In the late Ottoman empire, Qanun was the term used for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except Y .(the realm ..)..



A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

1. the term Q was the secular administrative law .. This is providing a nonsensical meaning . The term can never be secular administrative law .
2. , excepting for .. is wrong usage of verb-ing modifier .


B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

1. Q was the secular administrative law .. This is again providing a nonsensical meaning . Qanun can never be secular administrative law .
2. , excepting for .. is wrong usage of verb-ing modifier .


C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for


1. , excepting for .. is wrong usage of verb-ing modifier .

D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except

1. Correct .
-- Q was the term for S ..subjects ,except Y .


E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in

1. , except in .. changes the meaning . Also except in is a wrong idiom .
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2020, 09:29
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Quote:
In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.

A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for
D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except
E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in


notes: Qa is a term, thus it must refer to something; the correct idiom is "except for/in (preposition)" not "excepting..." - Qa is a term that extends to all subjects, but, it does not extend in the realm of personal law [except in the realm...].

ans (E)
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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2020, 22:28

OFFICIAL EXPLANATION



In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for the realm of personal law which was administered by the religious law of each confessional community, known in Turkish as a millet.


A. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

Incorrect.

This answer choice is illogical. This sentence tries to define the term "Qanun". However, the term Qanun itself is not the secular administrative law; the term only refers to that law. Stating that a word or a term is what it describes is illogical, e.g. the word 'cake' is tasty.

What helps us identify this mistake in the original sentence is the following Stop Sign: The word/term... (it) is...

Whenever we see this Stop Sign, we know that the question is checking the use of refers to/defines/describes after the word/term (and not is or was).

In addition, the phrase excepting for is non-idiomatic.

Look for an answer choice that uses except (not excepting!) in an idiomatically correct fashion.



B. Qanun (a term derived from the Greek "canon") was the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original logical mistake, it repeats the idiom mistake in the original sentence. The phrase excepting for is non-idiomatic.



C. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, excepting for

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original logical mistake, it repeats the idiom mistake in the original sentence. The phrase excepting for is non-idiomatic.



D. Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") was the term for the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except

Incorrect.

While this answer choice corrects the original logical mistake and the idiom mistake, it introduce a new logical mistake. Although the word except is used correctly, it requires in this case a preposition after it. Without such preposition, the construction all subjects, except the realm of personal law presents the realm of personal law as one of the subjects of the Ottman empire, which is illogical.

Note that here subject means citizen or resident of the empire (and not a topic). We know this because the sentence draws the comparison between secular law for all residents vs. religious law in local communities.



E. the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "canon") referred to the secular administrative law that extended to all subjects, except in

This answer choice corrects the original logical mistake by changing the term Qanun...was to the term Qanun...referred to. It also changes the idiom mistake by changing the incorrect idiom excepting for to except in.

The use of the preposition in (except in the realm of personal law) clearly indicates that secular law extended to all subjects generally, but did not extend to all subjects in matters concerning personal law.

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Re: In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca   [#permalink] 04 Jun 2020, 22:28

In the late Ottoman empire, the term Qanun (derived from the Greek "ca

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