It is currently 18 Jan 2018, 03:26

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 902

Kudos [?]: 472 [0], given: 69

Location: United States
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.98
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Aug 2015, 05:58
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Divyadisha wrote:

HI! Karishma,

Thanks for replying, but I am a bit confused now. You are saying that honey bee population has nothing to do with the conclusion; whereas, the conclusion says that decline in population will result in unavailability of fruits. So, certainly the population is important.

From the shared link I understand that we need to eliminate those options where decline in population has no role in availability of fruits and the flowers can be pollinated by other means.

But for choice ‘D’ if we take two extremes, I feel that the option makes sense to evaluate the argument
- YES. reducing the use of pesticide will reverse the decline (increase honey bee population)- Reduction of pesticide will help.
- NO. Reducing the use of pesticide will not reverse the decline- Reduction will not help

Please advise if there is any gap in my understanding.


Divya, the point is that whether a reversal is possible or not is immaterial to the conclusion.

Let me re-iterate:

What is the conclusion?

"If the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers."

Note that the conclusion is a conditional: "If this happens, that will happen."
You don't have to worry about whether "this" will happen or not. All you have to worry about is if "this" does happen, will "that" happen?

As an example:
"If I flunk, I will need to take the test again."

If you want to evaluate this opinion, you will try to figure out what I should do if I flunk and whether taking the test again is the only option or only good option etc. Will you evaluate whether I will flunk or not? No. That is not the point of concern here. The point is what I should do if I do flunk.

Check out this question on my blog post (link given above).


Hi! Karishma,

Great and simple example- ‘If I flunk, I will need to take the test again’ :). Thanks for this.

Basically, we have to assume the decline in honeybee population to be true and evaluate the argument. We should not be concerned about the reversal in decline.

Sharing my thoughts after understanding the question again:-
A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee? Even if honeybee population declines, there will be insect pollinators to pollinate the crops
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand? Even if honeybee population declines, people can get their fruit supply from other regions
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees? If honeybee population declines, there are hand-pollinating methods available.
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations? We are concerned with (Even if honeybee population declines)
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination? Even if honeybee population declines, scientists can develop genetically engineered plants to forego pollination

Hope my understanding is correct now. Thanks a lot for your help :)
_________________

I welcome critical analysis of my post!! That will help me reach 700+

Kudos [?]: 472 [0], given: 69

1 KUDOS received
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 04 Aug 2013
Posts: 29

Kudos [?]: 16 [1], given: 12

Concentration: Finance, Real Estate
GMAT 1: 740 Q47 V46
GPA: 3.23
WE: Consulting (Real Estate)
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Aug 2015, 07:57
1
This post received
KUDOS
Marcab wrote:
nelz007 wrote:
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the United States has been cut in half. The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees. Honeybees are the primary pollinators for a variety of important fruit crops, including oranges, apples, grapes, peaches, cranberries and watermelons. Therefore, if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful to answer?

A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee?
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand?
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination?


Not convinced with the OA given.
I feel the answer must be B.
A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee? YES Then fruits can be easily pollinated despite the decline in the number of honeybees. NO The decline will continue and in futute most of the fruits will be unavailable.
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand? We are concerned with the fruits in America. Who cares about Chile and New Zealand.
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees? YES If humans can pollinate the fruits, then fruits can be pollinated and in such a case conclusion weakens. NO If humans also are unable to pollinate, then surely the fruits will decline. Strengthens
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations? YES Then decline can be eliminated by reducing the use of pesticides. Weakens the argument NO So reduction of pesticide usage is also not going to help the fruits anyways. Strengthens the argument.
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination? YES If we can genetically engineer the fruit producing plants, then one may never feel short of fruits in America. Weakens the argument. NO Strengthens the argument.
Are you sure about the OA?



This is a classic trap on hard CR questions...for B, nowhere does it say that we are only concerned with fruits in America. We are concerned with the availability of "most fruits" to consumers. So intuitively, if we knew about supply coming from other fruit producing regions, we would know more about the availability of "most fruit". Agree that D isn't a perfect answer, but recognizing B is a trap makes finding the real answer a lot easier.

Kudos [?]: 16 [1], given: 12

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7863

Kudos [?]: 18465 [1], given: 237

Location: Pune, India
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Aug 2015, 20:40
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
HCalum11 wrote:
Marcab wrote:
nelz007 wrote:
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the United States has been cut in half. The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees. Honeybees are the primary pollinators for a variety of important fruit crops, including oranges, apples, grapes, peaches, cranberries and watermelons. Therefore, if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful to answer?

A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee?
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand?
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination?


Not convinced with the OA given.
I feel the answer must be B.
A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee? YES Then fruits can be easily pollinated despite the decline in the number of honeybees. NO The decline will continue and in futute most of the fruits will be unavailable.
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand? We are concerned with the fruits in America. Who cares about Chile and New Zealand.
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees? YES If humans can pollinate the fruits, then fruits can be pollinated and in such a case conclusion weakens. NO If humans also are unable to pollinate, then surely the fruits will decline. Strengthens
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations? YES Then decline can be eliminated by reducing the use of pesticides. Weakens the argument NO So reduction of pesticide usage is also not going to help the fruits anyways. Strengthens the argument.
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination? YES If we can genetically engineer the fruit producing plants, then one may never feel short of fruits in America. Weakens the argument. NO Strengthens the argument.
Are you sure about the OA?



This is a classic trap on hard CR questions...for B, nowhere does it say that we are only concerned with fruits in America. We are concerned with the availability of "most fruits" to consumers. So intuitively, if we knew about supply coming from other fruit producing regions, we would know more about the availability of "most fruit". Agree that D isn't a perfect answer, but recognizing B is a trap makes finding the real answer a lot easier.



You are spot on where (B) is concerned.
But (D) is the perfect answer. There can be no debate on it. The moment I will read it, I will mark it. I might not even take a look at (E) anymore. Look at my explanation given to Divya just two posts above yours.
Understanding that (D) is perfect is one of the core skills required in GMAT CR.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 18465 [1], given: 237

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 01 Nov 2013
Posts: 339

Kudos [?]: 244 [0], given: 403

GMAT 1: 690 Q45 V39
WE: General Management (Energy and Utilities)
Reviews Badge
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Aug 2015, 09:50
Hi guys

This question has been discussed many times over because of the atypical conclusion !!!

Please find the link below for similarly worded conclusion from GMATPrep.

early-in-the-twentieth-century-lake-konfa-became-very-142346.html

The correct answer to the above link should help dispel some confusion.If not, then use it for extra practice :) :)
_________________

Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.

I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.-Mohammad Ali

Kudos [?]: 244 [0], given: 403

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 13 Jul 2016
Posts: 48

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 309

GMAT 1: 770 Q50 V44
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Oct 2016, 03:58
nelz007 wrote:
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the United States has been cut in half. The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees. Honeybees are the primary pollinators for a variety of important fruit crops, including oranges, apples, grapes, peaches, cranberries and watermelons. Therefore, if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful to answer?

A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee?
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand?
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination?



Good Question, I think the confusion here is between option B and D.

Conclusion = if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

Option B - If yes, then other regions will also not be able to supply fruit to US market -> Strengthen
If no, then other area can supply fruit to US consumers, hence even if the Bee population in US declines, fruits will be available to consumers -> Weakner

Option D - If yes, Reducing the pesticide use will reverse the decline in honey bee population, implies fruits will be available to consumers --> Strengthner
If No, reducing the pesticides use will NOT reverse the decline in honey bee population --- Say the population will remain constant, have a look at conclusion, it satisfies the condition that decline in honeybee population is not happening, resulting in fruits being available to consumers - still a strengther or rather a no impact

Hence D is the correct answer

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 309

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 326

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Oct 2016, 04:16
The answer seems right as with reduced pesticide usage plant yield might fall even though number of honeybees increase. We do not know which would tilt the balance in a greater manner. (D)

Sent from my A0001 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
_________________

A well-balanced person is one who has a drink in each of his hands.

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jan 2015
Posts: 94

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 112

CAT Tests
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2016, 10:15
nelz007 wrote:

C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?


Hi dentobizz,

I am slightly confused about option C. Option C talks about hand pollination method for fruits that are already pollinated by bees. How is it relevant to the argument? Once the bees are extinct, we cant do much about this pollination technique. Can you please clarify?
_________________

Kudos is the best way to say Thank you! Please give me a kudos if you like my post

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 112

Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7863

Kudos [?]: 18465 [0], given: 237

Location: Pune, India
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2016, 22:02
Alok322 wrote:
nelz007 wrote:

C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?


Hi dentobizz,

I am slightly confused about option C. Option C talks about hand pollination method for fruits that are already pollinated by bees. How is it relevant to the argument? Once the bees are extinct, we cant do much about this pollination technique. Can you please clarify?


Check the explanation to all options here:
in-the-past-50-years-the-population-of-honeybees-in-the-142416-20.html#p1143709

(C) provides an alternative method of pollinating - by hand. If we are able to hand pollinate the fruit, then we don't need honey bees to pollinate them and hence, even if the population of bees declines, fruit will still be available.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 18465 [0], given: 237

Chat Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 596

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 140

Location: India
Concentration: Leadership, Strategy
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Premium Member
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 May 2017, 09:29
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
gmacforjyoab wrote:
Hi Karishma,

I agree with what you have said above. But the reason I felt A was just as strong as D ,was , since the argument already states that honeybees are the PRIMARY POLLINATORS for these fruits. So we already know that there are other pollinators that could pollinate these fruits. So when you think on these lines, A doesn't really help much , since we already know the answer to this from the argument itself. Although I do agree that D doesn't help in evaluating the argument either . So I cant figure out a way to justifiably pick one over the other.

-Jyothi


The argument only says that the honeybees are primary pollinators for these fruits. It doesn't mean there are other insect pollinators that could be used to pollinate. If honeybees are not there, the primary pollinator will be gone and little pollination may take place through other mediums such as wind/some other insects - we don't know. What (A) is trying to evaluate is whether there are other insect pollinators which could pollinate these crops (the use of 'could' tells you that they probably don't pollinate these crops right now). We are looking for an alternative primary pollinator.


Hello VeritasPrepKarishma,

Sorry to re-open an old thread but after reading through the comments, I am still not convinced as to how A is incorrect. Though I agree that D is correct, I feel that A is correct too.

Using your explanation: "The argument only says that the honeybees are primary pollinators for these fruits. It doesn't mean there are other insect pollinators that could be used to pollinate."

The stem says that honeybees are the primary pollinators. It does not mention that honeybees are the "ONLY" pollinators. Your explanation would stand true based on the keyword - only.

We know that there are other pollinators out there - maybe they don't do substantial amount of work as the honeybees but they are capable of pollinating. So the conclusion that fruits will no longer be available to consumers seems far-fetched.

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 140

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 439

Kudos [?]: 89 [0], given: 73

GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Transportation)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2017, 09:17
nelz007 wrote:
In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the United States has been cut in half. The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides in the United States, as well as to the introduction of two types of mites that weaken and kill the bees. Honeybees are the primary pollinators for a variety of important fruit crops, including oranges, apples, grapes, peaches, cranberries and watermelons. Therefore, if the honey bee population continues this drastic decline, then most fruits will no longer be available to consumers.

In evaluating the conclusion, which of the following questions would be LEAST useful to answer?

A Are there other insect pollinators that could pollinate these fruit crops instead of the honeybee?
B Are honeybee populations declining in other important fruit-producing regions, like Chile and New Zealand?
C Is it feasible for humans to hand-pollinate the fruits that have been pollinated by bees?
D Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
E Is it possible to genetically engineer fruit-producing plants so that they no longer require pollination?



I originally marked B -> but i can now understand that this is most most vulnerable choice, which is incorrect.
Option D on the other hand is correct answer.

Lets examine D
Will reducing the use of pesticides in the United States reverse the decline in honeybee populations?
Lets assume ans is YES ,Then Honey bee population will increase -> Is it sufficient to prove that their population will not be decreased again by MITES that weaken and kill the bees? The answer is NO .
Therefore the population will again reduce leading to an end to bees population.
So IF YES => NO POLLINATION => NO FRUITS
IF NO => ALREADY THERE IS DRASTIC DECLINE => THEIR END IS EVIDENT => NO POLLINATION => NO FRUITS.
_________________

Give Kudos for correct answer and/or if you like the solution.

Kudos [?]: 89 [0], given: 73

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 May 2015
Posts: 1

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 2

Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jan 2018, 04:06
The decline is due primarily to the increasing use of pesticides.. Which means there are other reasons for the population decline. So, "reducing the use of pesticides" may not stop the decline.

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 2

Re: In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the   [#permalink] 17 Jan 2018, 04:06

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   [ 71 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the past 50 years, the population of honeybees in the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.