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In the past several years, astronomers have detected more

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Re: In the past several years, astronomers have detected more  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2018, 23:52
namurad wrote:
In the past several years, astronomers have detected more than 80 massive planets, most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle other stars.

(A) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle
(B) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter and circling
(C) most of them at least as large as Jupiter, circling
(D) mostly at least as large as Jupiter, which circle
(E) mostly as large or larger than Jupiter, circling


My question is - why is c correct and D wrong?
The problem i see in c is that the antecedent of "them" is ambiguous. "them" in c can refer to planets or astronomers (isn't it so?)

In D - mostly is an adverb which modifies the adjective (large).


If the sentence had to intend that Jupiter is circling the stars, then would this be correct,

most of them at least as large as Jupiter circling other stars?
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Re: In the past several years, astronomers have detected more  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2018, 07:04
In the past several years, astronomers have detected more than 80 massive planets, most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle other stars.

(A) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle – wrong comparison
(B) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter and circling - wrong comparison -
(C) most of them at least as large as Jupiter, circling - CORRECT
(D) mostly at least as large as Jupiter, which circle – WHICH is revered to JUPITER, not to planets
(E) mostly as large or larger than Jupiter, circling

When we compare two things, that is possible MORE – THAN or AS -AS
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In the past several years, astronomers have detected more  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 13:10
Hi all,

I have a very generic doubt. COMMA + Ing structure modifies the entire previous clause and it is a verb modifier. Doesnt "Circling other starts" convery the meaning that the act of discovery was done by "circling other stars".

CAn you please elaborate? @dhaag
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Re: In the past several years, astronomers have detected more  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 13:21
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darshak281 wrote:
Hi all,

I have a very generic doubt. COMMA + Ing structure modifies the entire previous clause and it is a verb modifier. Doesnt "Circling other starts" convery the meaning that the act of discovery was done by "circling other stars".

CAn you please elaborate? @dhaag
Hi darshak281

How are you?

The thing with this is - - - > modifier "most of them at least as large..." is blocked off by commas on both sides. It makes comma + circling look like a comma +-ing modifier; However, that comma does not exist for the comma + ing purpose. Try to imagine removing that entire non-essential modifier and then read along.

Astronmers have detected more than 80 massive planets circling other stars.

Hope this helps.




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Re: In the past several years, astronomers have detected more  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 13:53
Skywalker18 wrote:
In the past several years, astronomers have detected more than 80 massive planets, most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle other stars.

(A) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter, which circle -- which incorrectly refers to Jupiter ; idiom issue -- as x as
(B) most of them as large or larger than Jupiter and circling - idiom issue -- as x as
(C) most of them at least as large as Jupiter, circling - Correct
(D) mostly at least as large as Jupiter, which circle -- which incorrectly refers to Jupiter
(E) mostly as large or larger than Jupiter, circling --idiom issue -- as x as

Answer C
Hi Skywalker18

Don't you think that which in option D correctly refers to planets because the verb following which is plural---> circle.

D is obviously wrong for other reasons.

Regards,
Sumit

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Re: In the past several years, astronomers have detected more &nbs [#permalink] 02 Sep 2018, 13:53

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